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setterguy

Ice inside of windows....

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Our house is less than 1 year old and we are coming up on our 12 month check up. I am having some problems with ice build up on the inside of a couple of the windows. My father in law said that was good, it was caused by condensation and meant the home was well insulated. I would like a more knowledgeable angle before I'm stuck with a potential problem that I will have to pay for. Thanks in advance..

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Setterguy.....I have the exact same problem with my windows. My house was built in '97. My wife and I just Purchased the house in September of '05. Every Winter i have the same problem...And all of my windows are wood framed so i am concerned about maybe a mold issue. I too am looking for answers as to whats going on. And what i should do to fix the problem

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Sounds like your windows have lost their seal. A temporary fix would be to use the window film on the inside. That gives you barrier from the cold window and the moisture in the house.

The problem could also be related to air circulation around the window, too. If you are running a humidifier or your heating system has an auto feature, you may need to adjust down a bit. I run my dehumidifier year round and rarely have ice issues.

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Not good. If you have condensation on the windows on the inside you have a moisture problem in the house. Where do you think the moisture from the windows goes? It will run down the windows to stain trim and sheetrock and infiltrate behind the window to the insulation. I would question the windows. You should not have to be putting up plastic on new windows. Sounds like your windows are cold. I would check to see if they were installed properly and are caulked and airtight. On a new house they should have been taped and sealed from the outside, hard to check that with out removing siding. Some skylights will freeze up due to the rising heat in a house against the cold glass. Also the steam in a kitchen and bathroom will cause some temprary fogging, But that is what power vents are for. I would check your humidity. In the dead of winter like this you are usual adding moisture because it is so dry. I would definitely question your builder. Take pictures..

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I build houses. This is typical of a house with too much humidity. Do you have a humidifier? If you do turn it down. The colder the weather the lower the humidity has to be. If you don't have a humidifier make sure you are using your bathfans. Do you boil alot of rice? Turn the fan on your furnace to run constantly. Ice on windows is almost always a lifestyle issue and rarely has anything to do with construction methods or quality of materials.

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Another reason that condensation forms on the windows is that alot of people leave there blinds/draperies closed all the time and with humidifiers running the window is hardly ever exposed to moving air. If you look at a properly installed HVAC system the diffusers are normally in the window area, that helps the windows get air washed to help prevent condensation on them.

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This will happen with most if not all new windows when the outside temp gets cold enough and the humidity inside the house is high. The colder it is outside the less indoor humidity it takes to form condensation on the windows. I had the same problem after installing new windows in my house. The company actually had a rep come out and did some testing and found the problem not being the windows of course.

Another thing that will help is to install an air exchanger in your house if you don't already have one. I installed one, it helped but didn't totally fix the problem.

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I will agree with too much humidity in the house. If I change the setting on my humidistat, I can increase the moisture on the windows as there is too much in the house. Todays houses are so air tight that the humidity cannot get out. I just lower the setting on my humidistats and it goes away. You could also run a dehumidifer to get rid of the extra moisture.

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Quote:

Sounds like your windows have lost their seal. A temporary fix would be to use the window film on the inside. That gives you barrier from the cold window and the moisture in the house.


You might not want to use shrink wrap on your windows. I put a couple of anderson windows in this house and a couple of Marvin windows in my house in Blaine and both windows have big warning labels about using window insulator kits. Has something to do with the argon gas creating somekind of Thermal Dynamics problem.

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I had the same issue. Lower the humidifier and make sure the air exchanger is running.

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i agree with harvey lee, the houses these days are so air tight that the humidity has no way to get out, you need to figure out how to lower it

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If lowering the humidity doesn't work for you a simple and very inexpensive solution to the problem is applying the 3M type window film. The film will keep the warmer inside air from contacting the cold glass and condensating. In the spring simply remove the film.

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I put new windows in our house this fall and have the same problem. Long story short it is as many have said a moisture problem. If you have fans runs them. Also as the temps get colder you will need to adjust your air exchanger. This will help. May not totally solve the problem but it will help. I think I will try the 3m film idea as well.

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Agreed...On these really cold days if I leave the blinds / shades closed my windows will get condensation on them. If I just open the blinds / shades and turn a ceiling fan or two on, they dry up pretty quick.

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Here you go guys...

switch your ceiling fans to reverse pulling air up. Open all blinds. If this does not work start at one corner of your home opening all windows as you go when you get back to your starting point close them all this will help to dry the air in your house by pushing out the wet air. These are all just quick fixes my advice is get an air exchanger!! Or a cheaper just as effective answer is go online find a product called Humistat and call them.

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Thanks for the replies guys, we do keep our blinds and shades drawn, and our humidifier was turned way up...I will try those fixes first. We do have an air exchanger but I'm guessing there was no way to get at the windows with the shades, blinds drawn. I appreciate it.

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setterguy, I do windows for a living. It is as stated probably a moisture problem. Inexpensive windows will show it quicker. I do have a pretty good packet on condesation if you e-mail me your address I could mail it to you. [email protected]

Ike

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Quality o windows will play a huge part beside all the other things mentioned. What type of air exchanger do you have and how are you currently using it?

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Just bought a Humistat and right now i am currently at a 20% Humidity rating. So from what i am gathering so far its either the quality of the windows or maybe some weather stripping?????? confused.gif

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20 % humidity is just too high for your house at these subzero temperatures. Dial down the humidifier until you see just a hint of moisture on the windows and keep adjusting it as the outside temperature changes. Trust me I'm a professional.

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I put in new windows in 2005. I was dissapointed to find ice on my windows, but my house does not have an air exchanger. Last night I opened a window in the bathroom after the kids bath for half an hour. And this morning it was 20 below and I did notice a huge difference with less ice on the windows.... Moisture is the key.

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If you have any hardwood flooring in your home, most manufacturers state minimum humidity 35%. If you get too much difference between top of flooring and bottom, you could get crowning, cupping and/or shrinkage.

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Based on Engineering Studies conducted at the University of Minnesota with an indoor tempurature of 70 degrees and 20 below outside your humidity should not be over 15%. Manufacturers Recomendations are designed to void warrantees. Trust me, I'm a professional.

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I would be interested in that information, where can I find it? Who would one go after when I have problems with my flooring? If I have problems with my flooring by not following the manufacturers requirements, they will "void the warranty". That is if the problem is related/caused by not following these requirements. I would also be interested in what the builders community has to say about minimum/maximum temp/humidity settings. Anybody know?

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