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h8go4s

Pushbutton start

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I have a new 2017 Hyundai Tucson with pushbutton start. Just wondering how well this works at -20 degrees and if it fails to start, what to do? It's my wife's car and she can turn a problem into a disaster pretty quickly.  :eek:  Yes, It's under warranty, but I want to avoid that inconvenience if possible.

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i have owned 3 different push start vehicles since 2008 and never had an issue with any of them in cold weather.

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50 minutes ago, RebelSS said:

Why would you expect it to be any different than a keyed start? :confused:

2nd that

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1 hour ago, RebelSS said:

Why would you expect it to be any different than a keyed start? :confused:

Cuz you don't have control over how long the starter cranks and I don't know how that's managed with the pushbutton start. You just put your foot on the brake and hit the button.

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If your battery is up to snuff, and with fuel injection, no reason your vehicle will not pop almost right off...even in very cold temps...unless you have other issues. The push buttons have a 4-7 second cut-off time, (most do) then you have to push it again if it fails to start. Not to worry. :)

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2 hours ago, RebelSS said:

If your battery is up to snuff, and with fuel injection, no reason your vehicle will not pop almost right off...even in very cold temps...unless you have other issues. The push buttons have a 4-7 second cut-off time, (most do) then you have to push it again if it fails to start. Not to worry. :)

Have you tried tapping out S.O.S on it when it doesn't start? :grin:

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9 hours ago, h8go4s said:

Cuz you don't have control over how long the starter cranks and I don't know how that's managed with the pushbutton start. You just put your foot on the brake and hit the button.

well with my truck I have to hit the brake to, to start it, and I pulled my foot off once and it would start  til I did it over

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I knew it wouldn't take long before the horshsh** slingers crawled outta the woodwork. Back to loading +P FMJ's. Much more enjoyable.

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49 minutes ago, RebelSS said:

I knew it wouldn't take long before the horshsh** slingers crawled outta the woodwork. Back to loading +P FMJ's. Much more enjoyable.

 I hope you don't have a PC program to find where IP addresses originate from...... I prefer hollow points. LOL!

Edited by Tom Sawyer

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my 2015 truck has a key, but it starts from the first turn, not how long you hold the key on start. meaning, I have had my fingers slip off the key while turning it without getting to full turn, but even with my hand off, it still started, (pretty weird). I would think a keyless ignition is the same. same thing with auto start, my truck and keyless car start every time in the extreme cold.

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Not sure with Hyundai, but Ford has a backup slot if the key fails to work wirelessly. A good reading of that owners manual will tell you.

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I am puzzled by this fascination with push button starting in vehicles.  What is the advantage over time tested and simple metal key? Why would I want to add one more 'doo-dad" to my trucks  electric system that complicates things? Seems to me the push button start  feature is mainly offered to trap young drivers into thinking it is something new and "totally cool".  It has been around for a long time but why the big fuss now. Can somebody explain it to an old fashioned key user?

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16 minutes ago, Ufatz said:

I am puzzled by this fascination with push button starting in vehicles.  What is the advantage over time tested and simple metal key? Why would I want to add one more 'doo-dad" to my trucks  electric system that complicates things? Seems to me the push button start  feature is mainly offered to trap young drivers into thinking it is something new and "totally cool".  It has been around for a long time but why the big fuss now. Can somebody explain it to an old fashioned key user?

Well it probably wouldn't hook up to the old Ford F100 anyway. ;)

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Man wouldn't I love to have a nice F100!   Years ago had a PU from Ford with that rock solid, dependable straight six! What a piece of work. I traded if off and the fella I traded it to did the same and it went through a bunch of owners. And the last time I saw the carcass of the thing it rigged to big saw (24" blade) and was being used to cut firewood and slabs for cabins.

Hell, it may still be running!!

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2 hours ago, Ufatz said:

I am puzzled by this fascination with push button starting in vehicles.  What is the advantage over time tested and simple metal key? Why would I want to add one more 'doo-dad" to my trucks  electric system that complicates things? Seems to me the push button start  feature is mainly offered to trap young drivers into thinking it is something new and "totally cool".  It has been around for a long time but why the big fuss now. Can somebody explain it to an old fashioned key user?

Why do we need those new fangled solenoid things? My 41 Plymouth had a thing on the floor that worked the starter.  And another one for the high beams.  Bunch of sissies!

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On 11/23/2017 at 9:39 AM, Ufatz said:

I am puzzled by this fascination with push button starting in vehicles.  What is the advantage over time tested and simple metal key? Why would I want to add one more 'doo-dad" to my trucks  electric system that complicates things? Seems to me the push button start  feature is mainly offered to trap young drivers into thinking it is something new and "totally cool".  It has been around for a long time but why the big fuss now. Can somebody explain it to an old fashioned key user?

I'm betting some of it is the "hey we got this" and some of it is cost effectiveness. A new vehicle with a key likely doesn't actually let you start the car. You hit the key and a module starts the engine. It' not like the past where the ignition switch controls the starter. If you dont hold the key long enough it wont start. You could just tap the key for and instant and it will start up because a module is watching the engine rpm. For ford the "key" has a little chip in it that the car looks for when that start switch is hit. There are multiple switches and wires to the ignition switch plus the tumbler that can fail becaue someone has 10LBS of keys on it.

 

Now you have a push button start. There are maybe two switches in the button and no tumbler to fail. Mr key officiandao can lo longer hang 10LBS of keys from the ignition switch and belly ache why it failed by "insert other brand" didnt. You have a few more modules involved that were already there but you get other cool features. I can lock and unlock my car with my keys in my pocket. My car will not lock the keys in the car if I'm a moron and forget them unless I force the car to lock the keys in it. Some cars and detect your approah and set your memory seat, radio settings, climate control excetera.

 

The O.E.M. can just make a key blank that' 5 bucks vs 50 plus if you need a key, but the Likely hood the fob will fail is low becase the fob will tell the car when it' battery is low. If the fob completey fails it still has a chip in it that does not need a battery to function if the system where to fail.

 

Yes, you now have a 200 buck fob, but I like the conveniences.

 

Fun little over view of how Ford does it for the most part: you press the start/stop button. The Body Control Module sees the electrical input. It sends a wireless signal to the key fob by 2-3 antennas in the vehicle. The fob then sends a signal to a Tire Pressure Module/Radio Tranciever Module. The T.P.M. then sends a networked message to the B.C.M. the B.C.M. will then initiate starting the car if the fob is good by sending a networked message to the Powertain Control Module. The PCM then cranks and starts the car.

 

Add some antenns to the door handles and you can lock and unlock the car from outside the vehicle with no key blade. The remote start also uses some of this system. The fob to the t.p.m. The t.p.m. to the b.c.m. and then to the p.c.m. 

 

Your newer keyed ford when the ignition switch/tumbler is turned to the crank position will look for the Passive Anti-theft System chip. Then one module will compare this with another module (b.c.m. to the p.c.m. Or instrument cluster) and if both modules agree the key is good, the com will crank the engine. That ignition switch has wires for Aceasoey, on, and start.

 

With the pushbutton system we eliminated a few wires if not all the wires and a tumbler that can fail.

 

In some Ford's the start/stop button is a module itself. So it doesn' need extra wires. It already had power, ground and communication for other functions. Cost savings, more money in the O.e.m. wallet.

 

UPHDA. That' my post for the evening.  Forgive any misspellings. I'l just blame my smart phone. 

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