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Tinkhamtown

Ice sled Hitching problem

20 posts in this topic

Problem with ice sled sliding into the back of ATV when I go down hill and sometimes on the ice then the rope gets wrapped around a rear tires. Just a pain.

Does any one have any ideas on how I can fix this problem?

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Put your rope through a piece of PVC or metal conduit just shorter than the rope. That's a cheap fix. Make sure you put a washer or tie a big knot on the hitch end so the rope doesn't get pulled back into the tube while it's unhooked.

Ferny.

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Thats a good cheaper fix for sure.

I'd spend the money and get a good rigid hitch type of system!

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I'd spend the money and get a good rigid hitch type of system!

Ditto

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I just spent part of sunday taking care of the same problem. I welded up a light ridgid hitch that will connect to the 2" ball on the 4 wheeler and quick connect to my scout and x2. It works great. I can't wait to be able to use it.

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Maybe I missed something that changed in the rules, but I thought the law required a rigid metalic hitch between the portable/sled and an atv. In other words, get a steel hitch and be safe.

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I built mine out of 1/2" electric conduit and eye bolts. Total cost was less than 10 bucks.

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Big DS, the rules last year was that was only needed if people were riding in the tub, if I recall - but that might have only been for sleds, not ATVs, I am not sure. But I am in the process of putting a hitch on two snowmobiles I just got, as I have used both rope and the "factory" rigid, and the rigid is muuuuuuch better for many reasons.

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The tube on the rope fix is a good cheap answer yet it can become a hassle once you need to fold it to get into a rig.

A new Frabill tow hitch has quick disconnects on both ends. The base hardware stays in place and folds out of the way. They will bolt to just about any sled that was rigged with a rope.

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Box MN. I think you are correct about the metalic hitch only if someone was riding in the sled. I have used the rope thing also and I think that spending the $60 for the rigid hitch for my Otter Lodge was the best money spent when it comes to pulling the sled and my own safety while driving the atv. Especially down a hill to the lake.

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i got a rigid one for my ice house and would never live with out it

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Thanks for the ideas.

Used your idea to make two hitches one for an Otter II sled and one for my Fish Trap Yukon. Used four 150# key chain snap rings, four 3/8” eyebolts, two ½” PCV pipe 10’ long, and some good nylon rope. Bolted eyebolts to the front corners of both sleds using existing holes and lots of wasters and nuts. Cut two 10’ PCV in two making four 5’sections and ran rope through two pipes and attached snap rings on each end. Snap rings go on and off the eyebolts on the front of the sleds very easily. Then on the end that hooks to the ATV ball hitch I just made a small loop. Looks like a big V with snap rings on each end on top that attach to eyebolts on sleds and loop that hooks over the ball hitch on ATV is on the bottom of the V. Total cost $10.40.

Also add a U bolt to the back of the Yukon so I have a place to hook a second sled so I can pull sleds in tandem. Several times last year I gave people who pulled they fish house out by hand a ride and fish house tow back to the landing.

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Post a pic of your handywork!

Thanks,

Ferny

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Looks easy enough. I'm gonna borrow your design and make one for my Yukon.

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That is an excellent idea. I had a single pole, but yours is much better. Good Job!

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Get a rigid metal tow bar from Otter, Frabil or Clam. they will stop a lot of the problems will the tub tilting from side to side so your not tipping your tup. Not a real big deal when going slow but as speed increases its a bigger deal.

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I always go slow and enjoy the ride. Lots of anticipation on the ride out and just plainly very very relaxed on the ride in after dark.

Tink

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