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Here-Kitty-Kitty

Umm ya no clue?

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So ya I was just minding my own business down in a certain spot when I found this. No clue what it is, but I did cut it open and seem to be a fish baby in it. My first thought was turtle egg, but nope was not a turtle in it. So what is it? I believe that I have too chalk it up to bull shark. Yep you heard it first here people bull shark in the minnesota river lol. Oh the other thing that the pics don't show is it stretched out and not twisted in the middle.

chaska002.th.jpg

chaska003.th.jpg

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I use to breed snakes and even when a female would lay slugs they would never come out like that. This thing was at least 6-7 inches in lenght.

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I think the real question is, "if it is a bull shark egg which bait should I use?" Would they like bullheads or cutbait? Do I need to upgrade to more than 80lb line?

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Maybe if you would have tasted it you could have narrowed down the possibilites some. Although, if it tastes like chicken it could be almost anything.

If I had to guess I'd probably have to say Alien baby. Either that or I'd say turtle egg. But its just a guess.

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Maybe if you would have tasted it you could have narrowed down the possibilites some. Although, if it tastes like chicken it could be almost anything.

If I had to guess I'd probably have to say Alien baby. Either that or I'd say turtle egg. But its just a guess.

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bring that bugger to the DNR...or the men in black....let us know who takes greater interest.

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and you were wading in that water...nice, oh yeah almost forgot about sitting on the sand bar, you better hope it was not a gator, bull shark or alien. At least big foot was not peeking around a tree at us this time haha

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You finally coming onto the cat forum very nice

For everyone that told me to contact the DNR I did and they have no idea what in the world it could be. The guys that I spoke to and sent the pics too said that they have never seen anything like that. They also told me to contact Da-Chise or someone down there to see if they would have any idea

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That's a Chupacabra Egg.

Very Bad Ju-Ju to disturb there nest site....not good..I'd consider a new spot for a while if I were you. Mama's not going to be very happy...Eh!

chupacabra.gif

I think Dark30 feeds them Bullheads and Cheetos so they leave him alone at night?

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Yup..the Mama Chupacabra may be eating them all, or spooking them off.

Yup...what da ya think Dark30?

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Could this be the stomach of a fish that just ate a smaler fish? a fisherman could have tosed the guts in the water or a animal ate the other parts. If this would wash ashore then the lining would start to harden? Hard to tell with the pictures and not seeing it is person.

Very interesting.

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Nope wasn't a stomach. It had no opening on either side of it and it was leathery like a egg. Also it would have had stomach acid inside of it at one time that would have eating away at the fish inside. This wasn't a stomach acid that was inside. It was a clear embryonic fluid like liquid. I have no idea!

Oh also the fluid filled the sack only maybe half the way maybe a little more

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well... we can rule out gator, and bull shark... and im gonna rule out alien. lol.

its could be a snake. maybe an unsucessful hatch? but im not putting any money on it

its definately not the egg of any fish in the minnesota river...

and its no way an egg from any softshell, snapper, or painted turtle...

whatever it is, it is something very very odd

how long was it?

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well... we can rule out gator, and bull shark... and im gonna rule out alien. lol.

Never rule out anything wink

Quote:
Shark Tales No More.

Live Sharks Caught in Minnehaha Creek

April 1, 2006

Skip Johanson

Star Tribune

Minneapolis, MN

Nokomis-area student Laura Zimmerley holds one of the shark teeth that brought the unlikely search to Minnehaha Creek. State DNR and Park Board officials watch as DNR biologists drive fish downstream towards waiting nets She was invited to watch as they began their search in the pool below Minnehaha Falls on Sunday, March 26. Photo by fdw/NENA.

laura-falls.jpg

Nokomis-area student Laura Zimmerley holds one of the shark teeth that brought the unlikely search to Minnehaha Creek. State DNR and Park Board officials watch as DNR biologists drive fish downstream towards waiting nets She was invited to watch as they began their search in the pool below Minnehaha Falls on Sunday, March 26. Photo by fdw/NENA.

Shortly after Jaws opened in Minneapolis theatres back in the summer of 1975, the number of swimmers using our area lakes and pools plunged significantly. So, when a 10 year-old Minneapolis student approached Minnesota DNR biologist Dan Marais about three fossilized shark’s teeth she had found in Minnehaha Creek, he could only smile to himself. More shark tales, he thought. That is, until he actually saw the teeth.

They did, in fact, come from sharks. However, two of the specimens were clearly not fossils, but teeth shed from a contemporary shark. Curious about the origins, Marais called a colleague at the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife to help identify the teeth and perhaps avoid falling victim to a hoax. What he learned made the small hairs on the back of his neck stand up.

After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita last year, a report by Gulf marine scientists had warned that the enormous amount of pollution back-flushed into the Gulf of Mexico would cause many species of marine animals to either relocate or perish. That expected decimation of the food chain led to warnings of a possible migration of coastal sharks into rivers where a higher oxygen content would support more aquatic life. Specifically, they were watching for the common Bull Shark (Carcharhinus leucas). The stuff of legends, this aggressive shark was already known for its ability to live, feed, and even breed in extremely shallow fresh waters. Bull Sharks had previously been documented as far north as the Ohio River. They have also been attributed to most of the attacks on humans worldwide.

Lab technicians positively identified these two teeth as having come from a two-to-three year-old Bull Shark. However, it was a semi-classified document dated February 12, 2006 from the Wisconsin DNR that really set the wheels in motion. On that date, ice-diving biologists captured a nearly comatose five-foot Bull Shark in Lake Pepin, a widening of the Mississippi River. They were responding to reports from several startled salvage divers of a sleeping, “shark-like fish” in the open cab of a pickup truck that had gone through the ice a few weeks earlier. The Wisconsin divers located the truck in approximately 18' of water with the shark still inside, apparently hiding from the swift current. But the cold water had slowed its respiration and metabolism so much that it was barely alive. After an examination, the fish was tagged with a radio location device and released back into the river (Wisconsin regulations do not allow the keeping or transport of live, non-game fish). Sadly, marine biologists doubt the fish will survive until summer without the needed quantity of minerals and trace elements found in saltwater.

Minnesota DNR biologist Dan Marais holds the larger of two juvenile Bull Sharks netted near the mouth of Minnehaha Creek during the early hours of March 27. Photo courtesy of Mn Department of Fisheries and Wildlife.

caught-the-little-devil.jpgMinnesota DNR biologist Dan Marais holds the larger of two juvenile Bull Sharks netted near the mouth of Minnehaha Creek during the early hours of March 27. Photo courtesy of Mn Department of Fisheries and Wildlife.

On February 12, 2006, divers working with Wisconsin DNR Fisheries personnel, caught this five-foot female Bull Shark under the ice on Lake Pepin, part of the Mississippi River. The nearly dormant shark was tagged with a radio tracking device and released. Photo courtesy of the Wisconsin Bureau of Fisheries Management and Habitat Protection.

pepinshark.jpg

On February 12, 2006, divers working with Wisconsin DNR Fisheries personnel, caught this five-foot female Bull Shark under the ice on Lake Pepin, part of the Mississippi River. The nearly dormant shark was tagged with a radio tracking device and released. Photo courtesy of the Wisconsin Bureau of Fisheries Management and Habitat Protection.

Worried about the negative effect on local recreation a man-eating shark might possibly cause, Minnesota officials ordered an immediate sweep of Minnehaha Creek. On Saturday, March 26, conservation officers began their search below the falls using ultrasonic stun devices to drive any fish downstream and into gill nets strung across the mouth of the creek. Despite catcalls and hoots from park patrons, the team worked downstream throughout the day and into the night. It was difficult work with shallow water and an unusual number of recently downed trees blocking the creek.

A little after midnight, two juvenile sharks were captured along with dozens of rough fish and several spawning Northern Pike. Both sharks were malnourished and docile, but in overall better health than the larger Lake Pepin specimen. The two fish are now in a special hospital tank at the Minnesota Zoo in Apple Valley, undergoing observation and a slow acclimatization back to salt water. The staff there have named them Lenny and Frankie, after two of the characters from the 2004 animated feature, Shark Tale.

This summer, scientists plan to install experimental freshwater sonar devices to watch for sharks in the two-mile stretch of the Mississippi between the Ford Dam and its confluence with the Minnesota River at Fort Snelling State Park.

For the safety of its visitors, the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board ordered signs prohibiting cliff diving or swimming in or below Minnehaha Falls until further notice.

So what about those two teeth? Technicians dated them by comparing tannin stain penetration to known levels in the Creek. They judge that the teeth had been in the creek for 7-10 years. Long before Hurricane Katrina.

Laura Zimmerley, feeling vindicated nowadays, can be heard humming the theme song from Jaws... Dah duh, dah duh, dah duh…

wink

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