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nofishfisherman

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nofishfisherman last won the day on September 18 2018

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About nofishfisherman

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  • Birthday 06/29/1981

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    Twin Cities

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  1. Sorry if I came across as a bit abrasive. Some of us can get a little surly around here and sometimes we forget we aren't talking to one of the other surly long-timers. I get what you're saying about a more hunting specific truck with some specific bells and whistles designed with hunters in mind. I do think the best way to get a truck like that would be to find the base model truck you like for all of the normal stuff trucks come with and then look for some sort of after market option. There has to be a pro or 2 out there that can take on such a project if you aren't up for tackling it yourself. I'd be a bit nervous cutting into a new truck as well so would look to hire it out as well. A couple things that I'd like. A winch in the bed like you mentioned. Could be used for loading deer, portable ice houses, or other large loads when you don't have another guy to help. Some sort of instant heat or maybe an app that could start your car from the stand. Maybe some sort of gun safe type lock box behind the seats or in the floor so that if you can keep your rifle or shotgun cased and locked up. It could be useful for times you may want to sneak out for a hunt after work and you want a better way to secure your firearm when at work.
  2. Just buy whatever truck you want and get started adding after market accessories, probably cheaper than buying all that stuff standard on a niche truck that will likely be really over priced due to it being a specialty item. Most of that list could probably be doable fairly easily. Personally I don't think half of that list is kind of pointless though. If your non-camo truck with reflective chrome bumpers is giving you away to the animals you might want to get a bit further away from your truck when you're hunting. If you're really struggling with loose ammo rolling all around the floor of your truck try leaving it in the box when its not in your gun. Key less entry might be nice but if you lose your key in the woods it will just give you a place to sit while you wait for someone to give you a ride home. Can't you already turn your lights/high beams off when your truck is running?
  3. I did all of those things. Poly barrier went up during the demo phase so I wasn't spreading the nasty stuff around the house. I had fans and dehumidifiers working to dry things out. was actually able to get everything 100% dry in less than 24 hours which I thought was pretty good considering how much water the carpet pad was holding on to, it was like a fully saturated sponge. I still have the carpet and pad pulled back to dry in case there is any residual moisture that I can't feel. I also picked up an air purifier and have that running to help take any residual musty smell out of the air and to help clean the air if there was any remaining mold spores floating around. The musty smell is about 95% better than it was before demo.
  4. I have been a bit concerned about water that I may not be seeing. When I cut back the wet drywall I cut it back to a point well beyond where I stopped seeing evidence of water. I suppose its possible I still missed something but I feel like I've done what I can do short of tearing out additional areas that aren't showing any signs of water. The entire basement will get torn out and remodeled down the road and at that point I'll look over every inch for and signs of hidden water but for now I can only address areas where I'm seeing it.
  5. I would have maybe considered Servicemaster but once i pulled the baseboard off there was obvious sign of previous water damage. The drywall had to come out. I cancelled some plans for the day and spent the day cutting out the bad drywall and furring strips. It ended up being roughly a 10' x 2' section. Really the damage was under a foot high but i cut back extra just to make sure i got it all. I was also able to salvage the cabinet and shelves. There were only 2 bad boards that were easy to pull and replace with new. So now ive got all the bad stuff out and I cleaned the walls with a bleach mix. I'll paint it over with killz in a few days and then once i have addresses the outside grade issues ill replace the drywall. All in all it could have been much worse.
  6. Im getting it dried out, that was the first step and the reason I pulled up the carpet the day I noticed it all. Step 2 will happen in the morning (I won't be home until late tonight) and that will be to spray down as much of the mold as I can in hopes of killing as much of it as possible before I start demolition. I probably won't have time to do demo until mid next week because I'm out of town starting sunday morning so I'll spray it all down and start the killing process now.
  7. I don't think the extent of the damage is beyond what I can do myself. The carpet and pad look fine and I've got it pulled back and drying well. The drywall damage is relatively small, I'm just going to cut back more to make sure. The cabinet/shelves that I need to take out is the biggest job but fairly straight forward. The biggest thing I'll need to figure out is how to seal off the area so that as I start tearing out the moldy stuff it doesn't spread mold spores throughout the rest of the house. Its already smelling pretty musty down there after disturbing it a little so I want to make sure I seal things off before really tearing into it. All debris will also be bagged and sealed before bringing through the rest of the house.
  8. Our soil has a lot of clay. Its really terrible soil. Regrading sections of the yard is absolutely going to happen as soon as the snow is gone. For now I've gone out there and dug down into the ground as much as I can with the frozen ground to allow the low spot to drain away from the house and it seems to be working very well. The low spot is no longer retaining water and I've got a nice river running away from the house.
  9. I was at menards last night picking up a couple more fans to speed the drying process and judging by how many fans they had left and how many people were in asking questions about pumps it seems like A LOT of people are having issues. That's why I thought I'd start the thread, a little commiserating over the work ahead of us.
  10. I have fairly long eaves on my house that really helps keep the snow away from the walls on my house. However when I rake my roof I do end up with piles of snow 3-4 feet away from the house. Once the melting started I was out there shoveling those away from the low spots. I for sure got my workout in that day. I think next year I may get the snowblower out and do what the guy across the street did and keep a path around the house clear of the heavy snow. I'll also be bringing in a lot of dirt to raise up the low spot I have.
  11. Anyone else dealing with water in your basement after all the rain and melting snow? This is the second winter I've lived in my house. No water issues last year but this year I've got a 10 -15 foot section of wall letting water in. There is a known low spot outside on that section of house and its on my list to deal with but it hadn't been letting in water so I kept kicking it down the road. Guess its time to address it this spring. I already went out and dug channels for the water to run and also extended the downspout an additional 10 feet so now its running at least 16 feet away from the house. In the basement I've got the wet carpet and pad pulled back with fans and dehumidifiers going to dry everything out. Looks like carpet and pad will be fine and I can just lay them back and restretch when dry. I did however find moldy dry wall and some moldy furring strips along the bottom 2-3 inches of the wall that was hidden behind the baseboard, baseboard shows no sign of any damage or moisture. I'll cut that drywall out up to maybe 2 feet up and replace a full section just to make sure I get up high enough to get all the mold. Might also have to replace an old built in cabinet/shelf that goes over the water meter. Looks like some water and mold hidden in there as well. Its amazing what you find when you start tearing stuff out. It can snowball on you pretty quickly. Thankfully nothing real serious got damaged at least that I'm seeing now. What I have to tear out and replace is annoying but not the end of the world. Probably cost me a couple hundred bucks and a couple days work. So how else is dealing with all of this water?
  12. Forgot to post the results after checking out my lights. All lights are working as they should except the small break light that is in the center of my trunk but that one has been out for quite awhile. If I turn on my headlights then all of the backlights on the dashboard/radio turn on and stay on with no alternating or turning off when I hit my breaks. If I leave my headlights off thats when i get the alternating back lights when hitting my brakes. Not sure I want to dig too far into this unless it could be a symptom of a larger issue. Its an old car with lots of creaks and rattles. Some alternating lights just had some extra mood lighting.
  13. Thats what I've done with them. Takes some time but works pretty well. The dried out one is re-hydrating now while a fresh one is re-hydrating the cigars.
  14. Just checked my humidor the other day after neglecting it a bit. Found the humidity down to 50-55%, uh-oh! Tossed in a new 70% boveda pack hoping to slowly bring them back up to 70%. Any other tricks to help revive them. I checked them out and they aren't cracking or anything so I don't think they are too far gone. Currently only 4-5 unwrapped cigars and another 5 wrapped cigars in the humidor. The wrapped ones are noticeably less dry.
  15. These have been around for a long time. If you've been in a gym lately you've probably seen them laying around. They do work very well at loosening up tight muscles. It can be painful at first but as you work at the muscle and it begins to loosen it feels pretty good. I have friends that are competitive marathon runners and they use them regularly to help their muscles recover after a long run. You can use them in just about any way imaginable so you can almost always find a way to target the muscle thats giving you problems. As far as cheap and easy remedies go this is one of the better ones if muscle tightness is your issue.
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