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dan z

who does what

35 posts in this topic

are thier any other water only guys out thier.

I know thier are some great field hunts around kato but it always seems like the feilds get pounded pretty hard thats why I stay on the water.

is water the place to be or is it the feilds?

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I'm strictly water. Back when early goose first started, obviously it was field hunting and I got drawn into it. But once they opened it up to water, I sold the field dekes and went back to my "grass roots". I just didn't care to lie in the mud, manuer, skeeters and such. Plus my folks live on the water we hunt, so it's very convenient.

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Water only for me too. I grew up on a swamp that holds ducks and have hunted it ever since. Some years were great others not so much. I have hunted it for over 30 years and it is the place for me when duck hunting.

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water for me with my dekes and such, I never made the investment into field dekes, so will jump flocks feeding, but for my set ups it's a shallow slough or pond and my chest waders and hopefully I don't get too wet if I go out to far, someday I'll get a duck boat for bigger waters

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wish they'd get back to not allowing water hunting during early goose...all it does is drive the geese out of an area (not having anywhere to roost)...typically that is back into city limits, where they stay eating grass until the weather gets cold enough where they need the higher energy food (corn)

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water only for me. I also love hearing these field guys whining about us water guys. They just dont like the competition. Your scaring them off their roost! boo-hoo. For starters where I hunt is NOT a roost, but a watering hole. So leave me be. There's plenty of geese for all of us. And all the guys I know that hunt water will not set up in the roost areas.

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Don't you think that you are scaring ducks away as well? DUH!

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If you aren't hunting a roost that is fine...problem is, most guys who hunt water for geese are hunting a roost (at least in the early season). Plus, as Rainman mentioned, you're disturbing the ducks a heck of a lot more by hunting the water before the duck season.

I'm not afraid of competition--just think everyone would be better off if they reverted back to the field-only early goose season.

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If they reverted back to the field-only season, my early goose days would be done. I'm not spending megabucks on field dekes again and trying to get permission from the handful of farmers who have any land worth hunting. Most times those few spots are already spoken for.....either by people who pay money to lease or the farmer has relatives who hunt the land. A "field-only" early goose season would only benefit a select few hunters who have the means to find a field to hunt.

The water I hunt, there aren't many ducks whatsoever that nest on the lake. There aren't many geese that do either as they prefer to nest and roost on the storm water ponds in the area. Most of the geese I shoot are those that come from some other area. And typically all we get on the lake are loaners, doubles and on rare occassion, we might get lucky and have a flock of 3 or more come in. Otherwise the lake is pretty barren of ducks and geese.

So for me personally, it's nice to have at least the opportunity to go out and enjoy time with my dad, brother and brother-in-law during the early goose season. And sometimes we get lucky and have one or two come in and provide some action. Otherwise, most of the time is spent BSing and rekindling memories of seasons gone by.

The other part of "don't hunt on water" I don't understand is this.....the only difference between hunting the early season versus the opener is 3 - 4 weeks. Even if there wasn't an early season on open water, the same result would occur on bodies of water....it would just occur a few weeks later. So regardless of having an early season on open water or not, the same end result will happen; it's just a matter of when.

And in my opinion, the youth waterfowl hunt does more "bird scaring" on ducks than the early goose on water does.

Not trying to be argumentative here. Just trying to rationalize.

My last opinion is this.....if there's such heartache among fellow hunters about early goose on water or a youth waterfowl season and the affects these seasons have, then the DNR should just get rid of them. Revert back to the old days where everything opened on one day. No early season this, no youth hunt that....just one big start to the season. That's how I grew up and in my humble opinion, it was much more fun to have that massive flurry of birds (both ducks and geese) when the noon whistle went off than it is now days. Since the DNR has allowed the early season, I will hunt it. And if the youth hunt is still around when my kids are old enough to hunt, I'll take them out too. But I will always feel that times were better (more fun) when we had just one big start to the season.

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I can't wait to "tuck" some geese into bed on the open water....

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Go knock on some doors, permission isn't that hard to gain. 350 bucks for a dozen fullbodys and you are set for early season goose hunting. Or buy a dozen shells and a blind for the same amount, there are also some great deals on used decoys online.

Being where the geese want to be is the main thing to a succesful early season feild hunt, not numbers of decoys or great calling skills.

I'm so sick of finding a feild to hunt and putting in the foot work scouting and then the mornings before the season watching the geese leave the roost and see where the end up in a feild only to have them shot off the roost the first morning and leave the area completly.

I know there are some responsible goose hunters that hunt water. But, geese go to water for refuge, wether or not it is the same area they roost on, if they are shot at on the water they become very wary and will soon leave.

Quote:
The other part of "don't hunt on water" I don't understand is this.....the only difference between hunting the early season versus the opener is 3 - 4 weeks. Even if there wasn't an early season on open water, the same result would occur on bodies of water....it would just occur a few weeks later. So regardless of having an early season on open water or not, the same end result will happen; it's just a matter of when.

Right, sure they would be shot at on the water eventually, but not when people are trying to hunt them in the feilds, thats the differnce. You don't want to understand this because you hunt water exclusivly.

I don't really think that the youth hunt or the early goose season effect duck hunting that much, I have still shot some very dumb birds on opening weekend.

Feild hunting also gives you a chance to really lay into the geese if you put in the effort. How many people have shot more than a handful on water during the early season? I'm sure some have, but limits are more common in the feilds.

Maybe moving shooting hours back on the water until 8:00 AM would be a better way to keep geese in the area and still allow hunting options for those of us who are afraid of knocking on a few doors and being turned down.

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I knocked on 23 doors last year, shot down on every one of them. Its not very easy around this area to get permission. I also gauge my hunts on limits there riverrat,(NOT!) I enjoy hunting on water and getting a limit is not that important to me. I can't wait to waterball those SOB's and if it screws up your hunt go pound some dirt!

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I've knocked on the doors, trust me. It doesn't appear you entirely read what I wrote though.....there aren't that many doors worth knocking on.....at least not in my area. There's only a handful (meaning 5 or less) of fields in my area where it pays to try and get permission. And these spots are already spoken for....either through land leases (for hunting purposes) or because the farmer has cousins, nephews, neighbors or what have you who already are hunting the land. It has nothing to do with "being afraid" to knock on some doors. Fear has nothing to do with it at all. The worst a land owner can say is no, and that's nothing to be afraid of.

It's easier to talk about spending $350 at the drop of a hat when you're single and/or don't have kids. When you have kids, a wife and living responsibilities, it's quite different. That is why if it ever reverted back to field hunting I wouldn't be spending the money on field dekes.

Quote:
I know there are some responsible goose hunters that hunt water. But, geese go to water for refuge, wether or not it is the same area they roost on, if they are shot at on the water they become very wary and will soon leave.

The same/similar can be said about the fields. Geese go out to the fields to eat. Then they get blasted on the fields and have no where to eat and so they move out of the area. What is so different whether it's water or field? Either way they get shot at. If they get shot at on their roosting grounds enough, they won't come back. If they get shot at on the fields enough, they won't come back. Same story, different version. The early goose hunt is established to control local goose populations.....both on the water and in the fields.

Quote:
Right, sure they would be shot at on the water eventually, but not when people are trying to hunt them in the feilds, thats the differnce. You don't want to understand this because you hunt water exclusivly.

So the only people that should be allowed to hunt the early season are those that can find a field to hunt from? It's only 3 or so weeks. Woopty do. And again, you maybe didn't entirely read my first post in that I started out hunting the fields. Now I hunt water exclusively, but I didn't start out that way. And I'd ask that you not presume to think that I want or don't want to understand something. I've heard that before elsewhere and after further discussion, the person realized I did want to understand and that I did understand the situation at hand.

Maybe for some it's all about shooting limits of geese. But being able to hunt the open water, as I mentioned in my previous post, allows me time to spend with my brother, dad, brother-in-law BSing and rekindling memories from years gone by. For us, it's about opportunity to spend time with family doing something we enjoy. Any numbers of geese we get (or don't get) is an added bonus (or not).

And should hunting the water be eliminated because those who hunt the water don't "lay into" the geese as much as those on the fields? Again, this to me sounds like it's more of a numbers game than a full hunting experience.

Quote:
I have still shot some very dumb birds on opening weekend.

I have too, but when speaking of opportuntities, they aren't there as much as if there wasn't a youth hunt. This was easy to see when the first year the youth hunt was put into effect and has been evident ever since. I'm not totally against the youth hunt, but ducks become more weary when they're shot at directly as compared to hearing shots off in the distance.

And if they moved the shooting hours to 8:00am on the water, that's fine by me as the opportunities at geese on the water generally come after the geese have been shot at on the fields.

Allowing the early goose season to be hunted on the water creates opportunity for those that either cannot find a field to hunt (due to whatever factors) or for those who are set up for hunting on the water. There are more hunters out when there's that added option of hunting on the water. There are more kids out when there is the option of hunting on the water. It creates more opportunity for more people and that in my eyes is a good thing.

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I get up towards Mankato well more Nicollet (halfway though), and have had luck getting permission in a few feilds, but once geese are in the it's too late. Take a chance on a feild geese have been in in past years and get out there early to ask them.

I'll just say this, the hunting on water can make feild hunting much more difficult. If it's not your cup of tea and you want to take a chance at killing a few geese on a lake fine. The statement about it not being that expensive to get into feild hunting was in response to the mega bucks that it was thought to take to get into it. A dozen deeks and creative way to cover up, like some burlap and you can be out feild hunting, early season doesn't need a 100+ decoy spread.

Trust me guys taking a limit of anything isn't my goal, but I'd be lying to you if I said I got up at 4:00 all season long only to lay out in the mud and bugs and rain to stare at the sky and talk to my friends. Sure I have had fun on days I didn't shoot a goose or duck or catch any fish, and thats what it's about, but being sucessful always makes me feels like I accutally accomplished something. If you don't really care about shooting a goose or a duck then I just have to ask why your up at who knows when and crawling into damp leaky waders in the mud and cold water, because that isn't that much fun.

As far as the youth hunt, thats the only reason I'm having this argument right now.......so you can figure out my feelings about it. I don't really care how you guys want to hunt, but I'm against hunting on water during the early season. It's legal so take advantage of it if you wish.

Ok, I'm done complaining and arguing, but I do have a question for you eyepatrol, obviously you hunted feilds when you started out, (it was the only option) what made you change to only hunting water? More consistent action? Easier access? Just a question and while I have done it when I first started out hunting (thats what my neighbor did, and I tagged along), I was not too excited by the experience and I found a layout blind much more comfortable than a duck boat bench.

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"Maybe for some it's all about shooting limits of geese. But being able to hunt the open water, as I mentioned in my previous post, allows me time to spend with my brother, dad, brother-in-law BSing and rekindling memories from years gone by. For us, it's about opportunity to spend time with family doing something we enjoy. Any numbers of geese we get (or don't get) is an added bonus (or not)."

I agree completly...

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Quote:
but I do have a question for you eyepatrol, obviously you hunted feilds when you started out, (it was the only option) what made you change to only hunting water? More consistent action? Easier access? Just a question and while I have done it when I first started out hunting (thats what my neighbor did, and I tagged along), I was not too excited by the experience and I found a layout blind much more comfortable than a duck boat bench.

A few reasons. First and foremost, my dad, brother and brother-in-law were willing to go out hunting on the water. They wouldn't hunt the land in previous years, which, didn't really produce much of anything anyway. Secondly, it was easy access as we hunt the water body my folks live on. Public land in some areas and private land in other areas that we get permission to sit on shore each year.

The action is a little more consistent than the field hunting days, but not by much. The geese don't nest/roost on the lake, they do that on the storm water ponds. So there wasn't any geese coming to the lake because they roost on it. We get a couple straggler geese each early season that break away from the main flocks when they're shot at in the field, but other than that, the geese in this area know to fly from the pond and around the lake. They don't fly over the lake much at all and if they do, they stay away from the calling, dekes, just about anything on the lake and that's because they're headed out to feed. On their way back, they head straight for the storm water ponds and don't stop for anything.

And for us, we're able to sit on shore which really isn't bad at all. The ground is fairly cushioned with good grass cover in many areas and bullrushes in other areas. All depends on the wind direction.

Some of the most fun we have early goose hunting season, besides the BSing, is watching ducks come from the sloughs, buzz around the lake, sometimes sit near the dekes. It's a lot of fun watching the birds just fly. It's also fun to hear field hunters in the area calling and every once in a while, you hear a barrage of shots from field hunters.

The early goose hunting around here isn't fast and furious by any means....water or field. But it is fun to watch the sun come up, listen to the sounds, watch the ducks fly, have a muskrat or two swim right by your feet and sometimes even see a deer or two. Every now and then we get to blow at some geese. Typically we get anywhere from 1 - 6 geese over the course of the early goose season. I don't think we've been skunked over the course of the early season yet....knock on wood.

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Very good reasons and I understand why you would chose to do so. One thing that stood out to me was that you said action was more consitent. Having only hunted on water a few times and that was 5+ years ago, we did bag a few geese each of the times, feild hunting for me has been more of a feast of famine, it seems either we get into them fairly well, or we are way off and only see 3 geese all day. It's all about the challenge I guess....

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holy cow if I wanted to read a novel I'd head to the local library

I agree though, the youth waterfowl day should be done away with!

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Very funny, and true Sartell Angler...

Man that cracked me up ...I was just thinking the same thing

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If the question is only for early goose season, then I am neither. I used to go out for early goose in the early days of it (I am old) but not anymore. It just doesn't feel right goose hunting with mosquitoes sticking you. For me anyway. It's still good to be on the lake chasing schooling smallies smile

But if the question is in general waterfowling, I much prefer hunting over water. I just like water, and we have a fleet of duck boats: 16' with 50hp (that we bring a Puddler in for "tending"), 2 Puddlers, 1 Pintail, 14' alum, 12' alum and even a belly boat (well, I guess we just gave that one away). We hunt mostly divers though, but now with the Puddlers we get onto smaller water as well before work, and it is fun.

I do have the field spread for NoDak, but since getting on fields has been more difficult lately, we don't hunt fields in MN that much, maybe a few times a year. It just isn't the same as on water (lake or slough or river) but it is fun when you have those big things right in your face smile

Enough of my novel. I just like water, whether standing in rushes or sitting in a boat, or laying in the Puddler on a rice lake. Can't wait for fall!

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Oh BOO HOO , those little kids are shooting all those ducks and scaring the rest away .

I live on Swan Lake in Nic Cty and it just brings a Big smile to my face the day of youth season , hearing all the blazing away out there , knowing those kids are having the times of their lives . They get the chance to say "I got that duck"

This will be my 56th year in the blind , and I'm very happy the kids have this opportunity.

Bud

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who ever said you cant shoot limits upon limits of geese on water must not do enough water homework. us water hunters have a tough time scouting becuse we just cant follow them the evening before and set up shop on the x the next morning I will have to say we shot 51 geese in three days last year all on water so it is possible to shoot numbers!

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I'd much rather hunt over water and once duck season hits you'd dang near have to drag me to a field. Early goose is a whole different ball of wax though.

YWD is nothing more than a tool used by the DNR to decrease the opening day harvest.

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Quote:
YWD is nothing more than a tool used by the DNR to decrease the opening day harvest.

I partially agree with you on that.

Personally speaking, I'd like to see the early goose and youth day gone. Openers would be much more interesting.

Each and every outing a kid goes on should be about the kid getting the first shots until they're old enough to keep up with the "big boys". You don't need a youth hunt for a kid to get his own ducks as long as dad or the guardian are not selfish.

There, I kept it short & sweet and not a novel. smirk

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I'll take field hunting over water hunting any day. It's less work and more comfortable. I've never laid in manure yet, although in Kansas we had a herd of cattle walk through the dekes while we were sitiing in our blinds. I'm not saying everyone should field hunt early season but it does keep birds around longer, sometimes you can just keep poppin birds from the same flock if you dont kick them off the roost.

But I guess I'm lucky, I have a lot of farmer buddies who own both the pond and the field.

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