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waker

Trichoderma fungi to fight of blight.

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Anybody have experiance with adding Trichoderma fungi (green mould)to the soil to control unwanted fungi and pest?

I'm new to this idea but from the little reasearch I'v done it looks promising. I guess the fungi helps break down soil, like compost and bark, into digestible nutrients for the plant to absorb. It will also attack other fungi and insects.

A freind of mine was having a hard time growing mushrooms because of green mould taking over. After doing research on how to eliminate the green mold he stumbled across the benifits of Trichoderma in the garden.

Trichoderma is naturaly occurring in soil but it can be depleeted from drought, to much water or. Soil compaction.

Any thoughts?

 

Edited by waker

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A snippet of what I found as research.

 

 

Experiments conducted on several crops such as: peanut, tomato, cucumber and durian indicate that selected Trichoderma strains could reduce significant diseases caused by fungal pathogens including: Phytophthora palmivora, Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium spp., Sclerotium rolfsii and Pythium spp. The efficacy of Trichoderma species on soil borne fungal disease is higher than fungicides and maintain longer. The value obtained through development, exploitation and use of Trichoderma products are not only plant disease control but also gave the local people opportunities to reduce health risks, costs and environmental damage due to over fungicide usages. Moreover, crop treated with Trichoderma grown better and had higher yields to compare with the one without application

 

.A snippet of what I found as for the benifits. 

 

 

Edited by waker

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So which selected strains? Who did the research?  And who is selling them for how much? 

Edited by delcecchi

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So he used green mold to eradicate green mold that was hindering his mushroom growth?

 

My guess is if you do a soil analysis and figure out what your soil is lacking there is probably a better way to improve the soil without introducing mold into the equation.

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Del, ligit questions. I'm just starting the research on this. One article I read mentioned you can buy a granulate at a good nursery.  I have not called a nursery to substantiate the claim. As far as studies there are many out there to choose from. The snippet was from a study done in Vietnam. as for strains:      R. solani strain 618 (AG 4), and five T. harzianum

 

Purple, Trichoderma is naturaly occurring in all soils, its also used commercially in the agg field for starting seed cultures. Its actually one of the most previlant fungi out there. No, my freind did not use green mould to fight green mould he stumbled acrross these studies looking for remedy to combat the Trichoderma fungi. His conclusion was keeping the surroundings extremely sterile and using a heppa filter to clean the air of other fungi in the sterile enviroment. I guess in the mushroom buisiness Trichnoderma is a problem .

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47 minutes ago, PurpleFloyd said:

So he used green mold to eradicate green mold that was hindering his mushroom growth?

 

My guess is if you do a soil analysis and figure out what your soil is lacking there is probably a better way to improve the soil without introducing mold into the equation.

Why not use a good fungus to outcompete a bad fungus?

 

The soil is filled with fungus already, it's supposed to be part of the equation.

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3 hours ago, waker said:

Del, ligit questions. I'm just starting the research on this. One article I read mentioned you can buy a granulate at a good nursery.  I have not called a nursery to substantiate the claim. As far as studies there are many out there to choose from. The snippet was from a study done in Vietnam. as for strains:      R. solani strain 618 (AG 4), and five T. harzianum

 

Purple, Trichoderma is naturaly occurring in all soils, its also used commercially in the agg field for starting seed cultures. Its actually one of the most previlant fungi out there. No, my freind did not use green mould to fight green mould he stumbled acrross these studies looking for remedy to combat the Trichoderma fungi. His conclusion was keeping the surroundings extremely sterile and using a heppa filter to clean the air of other fungi in the sterile enviroment. I guess in the mushroom buisiness Trichnoderma is a problem .

If it would help with early and late blight of tomatoes it would be a Godsend....   Sorry for being a little abrupt in my post.  I read your post as a come on for a scam type thing which it seems was a mistake on my part.  

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4 hours ago, bobbymalone said:

Why not use a good fungus to outcompete a bad fungus?

 

The soil is filled with fungus already, it's supposed to be part of the equation.

They were both described as green fungus. Was it the same fungus or different strains?

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27 minutes ago, PurpleFloyd said:

They were both described as green fungus. Was it the same fungus or different strains?

 

Green fungus doesn't mean anything.

 

I'm just going to assume that there are different strains involved, as that's how this sort of biocontrol thing described works.

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Del, I didn't even think of it other than you asking questions. With the scams out there its easy to have one's gaurd up and that's a must these days.

 

As for the long post I find this interesting how this fungi opperates and the many uses it has. Those faded bleach jeans that were a fad back in the 80's not bleach, a bat of Trichoderma with other stuff ofcourse.

 My  freind was  just telling me about a drug containing Trichoderma for a form of cancer. 

Looks like Purple and Bobby are in need of a snugel time. Just giving ya hard time guys:grin:.

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On 6/21/2017 at 5:16 PM, PurpleFloyd said:

My guess is if you do a soil analysis and figure out what your soil is lacking there is probably a better way to improve the soil without introducing mold into the equation.

 

Even I also think about this. 

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