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wallter

Keeping your Boat stable on a Point or bare Shoreline?

15 posts in this topic

I am curious to here how you guys keep your boats stable. I need to come up with a new system. I used to take about 6' of metal conduit and push it as deep into the Loon [PoorWordUsage] as I could get it and then put it into this mount that went into the oar locks on my boat, then I'd tighten a screw to hold. I broke the weld reaming on it and think it's pretty rickity anyway and not worth fixing.

Any idea's out there?

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usually just try and get it in the weeds as tight as possible, I usuallt hunt pretty thick cattail lakes so I dont have a problem with it, I have seen some guys do something like you mentioned, try to use two push pole on opposite corners and tyr of to them as tight as possible good luck sorry I was not to helpful

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best way like danz said is to push it deep into the cattails. Ive hunted with other methods and they almost give you a false sense of security.

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Yep, get in the cattails as far as you can.

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Hey guys thanks for the posts but I'm talking about those instances when you hunt an area like a point or shoreline and are staying in the boat.

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if I run into a spot like that I just ditch the boat around a corner or just up the shoreline tough to hide it on bare ground

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I know what you are talking about. Our group has a similar problem with boat stability. We haven't tried anything yet. Just being careful. But we are thinking of finding old dock posts and mounting them to the boat wall somehow. I thing that is the best option.

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I know most are not going to believe this but I have had some real fun with this. We sometimes hunt a small swamp lake that gets a fair amount of pressure. On a couple of occassins all the good spots are taken so we have set up on the big bald rock island in the middle of the lake. Not a bit of cover at all. We just sit still and really watch to keep any movement to an absolute minimum. Ducks do not seem to mind.

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I know most are not going to believe this but I have had some real fun with this. We sometimes hunt a small swamp lake that gets a fair amount of pressure. On a couple of occassins all the good spots are taken so we have set up on the big bald rock island in the middle of the lake. Not a bit of cover at all. We just sit still and really watch to keep any movement to an absolute minimum. Ducks do not seem to mind.

Page 10 of the waterfowl regs:

Taking in Open Water

A person may not take migratory waterfowl, coots, or rails in open water unless

that person is:

a) within a natural growth of vegetation sufficient to partially conceal the person or boat, or

B) pursuing or shooting wounded birds (while in compliance with the watercraft restrictions listed below), or

c) on a river or stream that is not more than 100 yards in width.

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I used to use 1x2 or 2x4 and would jam them in the mud and clamp them with C clamps. We would then drape camouflage from one post to another. That worked great for stability of the boat and a way to use more camouflage for cover.

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Originally Posted By: shamrock7
I know most are not going to believe this but I have had some real fun with this. We sometimes hunt a small swamp lake that gets a fair amount of pressure. On a couple of occassins all the good spots are taken so we have set up on the big bald rock island in the middle of the lake. Not a bit of cover at all. We just sit still and really watch to keep any movement to an absolute minimum. Ducks do not seem to mind.

Page 10 of the waterfowl regs:

Taking in Open Water

A person may not take migratory waterfowl, coots, or rails in open water unless

that person is:

a) within a natural growth of vegetation sufficient to partially conceal the person or boat, or

B) pursuing or shooting wounded birds (while in compliance with the watercraft restrictions listed below), or

c) on a river or stream that is not more than 100 yards in width.

I would't be too worried about it.... if those ducks are that stupid,their about to be shot soon.

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... not to mention it's not open water.

It's an island.

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... not to mention it's not open water.

It's an island.

Surrounded by ????

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Doesn't matter if it's surrounded by Lienenkugels....

You can legally hunt a sandbar in a river, a rockpile in the middle of lake Superior, or an island in the middle of Never Never Land Lake.

What you can't do is anchor your boat in "open water" and attempt to shoot ducks.

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What chub said.

I have stabilizer brackets on my boat that are off-set of the middle of the boat. I had a friend weld about a 6 inch piece of tubing to a piece of flat iron. Then drilled a hole in the tube and welded a bolt to the tube over the hole. I push a pole into the tube and then tighten a bolt welded with a handle to hold the tube secure. It really works well for stabilizing the boat and keeping it in place where you can't get into the cattails or the cattails are not heavy enough to secure the boat.

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