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bobberineyes

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Not a falcon, worked with so many of those at MAYO.  Hard to tell me....maybe a kestrel, or if bigger, a Coopers...I have a family of those here. Only way for me to tell them apart from sharp-shinned is their distinct cry....KAKKAKKAK ....sound familiar??

 

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Coopers_Hawk/sounds

 

 

Kestrel pic...but your birds eye looks more like a hawk to me, boober.

kestrel.jpg

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11 hours ago, delcecchi said:

Besides I don't think peregrines hunt stuff on the ground.  Pretty much birds are their diet so far as I know.   

You would be absolutely correct, Del-o-wicious.

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14 hours ago, RebelSS said:

O heck, dat easy!! Why didntcha say so?! Dats a broadwing, I think!!! Does it sound like this:

 

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Broad-winged_Hawk/sound

 

=

Yep, sounds just like them.  I'll have to watch a little closer the Mrs said the hawk got a sparrow the day before. Maybe there's more than one kind feeding at the feeder.. Thank ya sir!!

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6 hours ago, RebelSS said:

Anytime! If they start whistling Dixie though, better let us know....:lol:

The antifa crows will get them for that

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Looks like a Cooper's to me, but sounding like a broadwing, maybe you got both hanging around?  Definitely not a falcon though. 

The mass migration of the broadwings is really something to see.  Years ago had one go over my city bus route in SE Iowa;  I lost count in the midhundreds in the air all at the same time, soaring on the thermals and I wasn't half done.   I never saw anything quite like it since.

The hawk migration south has definitely begun for this year, too.   On the road this past week, I saw quite a number of them on fence posts and soaring. 

Still some turkey vultures around, but they should be leaving very soon, too.  It seems to me that years ago they didn't come quite this far north, at least not in the numbers we are seeing now.

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Vocalizations: Birds of prey are not typically vocal, but Cooper's hawks will use a rapid, sharp “keh-keh-keh-keh-keh-keh” call alarmed or aggressive, as well as a high pitched whistle when threatened or in distress.

cooper-sharpie.jpg

Sharp Shinned left......  Coopers right. 

I see them about once a week here. 

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I know. I've had a nest of Cooper's in my tree that have driven me nuts all Spring/Summer with their KAK KAK KAK KAK.....

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Coopers_Hawk/sounds?gclid=EAIaIQobChMImv3U16ui1gIVAqppCh37kAPFEAAYASAAEgJatfD_BwE

 

Just sayin', I took it he meant that it was it's "normal' call....the whistle. 

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I just watched "mine" land in a tree crotch that had a small squirrel on the other side......squirrel was giving it's "whine" distress call, and sidling around the tree, directly across from hawk. This went on for ten minutes; surprisingly, the hawk just flew away...couldn't get a vid; tree had too many leaves.

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havnt seen them take out a squirrel here yet but they get a chipmunk one in a while. I have a few pics of them on here from the last few years. Usually its zap something and they are gone.  

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Well, a group of them a few years back thought my deck was their own personal resort....:D

I'm not positive what species these guys were, but they didn't make the KAK KAK KAK annoyance call...

These oughtta trip yer trigger.  :P

IMG_0870.JPG

IMG_0880.JPG

IMG_0860.JPG

IMG_0876.JPG

IMG_0842.JPG

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1 hour ago, eyeguy 54 said:

coopers or sharp shinned. they love bird feeders. LOL 

yea i'v had them swipe a few of the birds I feed a couple times this summer.:angry::(

 

on another note last nite i was cleaning up dog reminants around the yard and found a young bird in the lawn. looked like it could of been a young finch???????? thought it was odd to find a youngin this time of year. checked later and was nowhere to be found!!!!!!!!

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16 minutes ago, smurfy said:

yea i'v had them swipe a few of the birds I feed a couple times this summer.:angry::(

 

on another note last nite i was cleaning up dog reminants around the yard and found a young bird in the lawn. looked like it could of been a young finch???????? thought it was odd to find a youngin this time of year. checked later and was nowhere to be found!!!!!!!!

And how many cocktails had you consumed? :whistle:

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  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • Last Thursday on a visit to my sister in Rock Rapids IA, we made a circuit through the Island Park there.  At the low dam just past the former railroad bridge which is now a walking path we saw a group of grackles fishing at the edge of the white water where it ran against the rocks at the shore line.  There probably were a dozen or so all told moving back and forth and some on the rocks at the other shore line.  In something like half an hour or less we saw various of the birds bring out minnows and eat them on the shore to a total of at least 8.  They also contested for the better fishing spots and tried to horn in on other birds' catches;   they would fly out to quite a bit up on shore with a catch to eat it there. I never expected to see grackles fishing.  I never heard of that before, but then it wouldn't be the first time I didn't know about something relatively common.
    • I've seen deer there, too.  I go by there on my way to work about 3:30 am S S & M.
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    • NORTHWEST IOWA FISHING REPORTS Arrowhead Lake
      Bluegill - Fair: As water continues to warm, look for bluegill nest colonies along the west and east shorelines; the highest concentration are likely in the southern end of the lake. Use a small tube jig tipped with a piece of crawler. Black Hawk Lake
      Water temperatures are around 70 degrees. Water clarity is 5-6 feet. Bluegill - Fair: Fish for bluegill just about anywhere along the shoreline. The fish average 7-8 inches. Use a small hair or tube jig with a small piece of crawler fished under a bobber off the floating fishing pier, the west stone pier, and the inlet bridge. Look for bluegills to start moving closer to shore, sitting on nests; you can easily target the males. Walleye - Fair: Anglers are picking up walleye from shore and by boat. Town Bay, the shoreline along Ice House Point, and near the inlet bridge are producing fish. Use leeches fished under a bobber and twisters on the downwind shoreline where walleye are feeding. Black Crappie - Slow: Anglers are still picking up fish from Ice House Point, the floating dock, the stone piers, and the inlet bridge. Catch fish up to 11 inches with crawlers and leeches fished under a bobber. Largemouth Bass - Good: Catch largemouth all over the lake using the traditional bass lures. Many anglers have found good bass action at the Ice House Point, the east shoreline,and the lake side of the inlet bridge.  Storm Lake (including Little Storm Lake)
      Water clarity is 3-4 feet. Storm Lake has a daily limit of 3 walleye and all 17- to 22-inch walleye must be released; no more than one walleye longer than 22 inches may be taken per day. Walleye - Fair: Much of the walleye action has shifted to the boat anglers. Boat anglers are doing well trolling shad raps or ripple shads or drifting crawler harnesses on the edges of the dredge cuts around the lake in about 8 feet of water. Black Crappie - Fair: Anglers are picking up suspended crappie out mid-lake in the dredge cuts while fishing for walleye. White Bass - Fair: Use crankbaits; most action has been from boat while fishing dredge cuts.  Swan Lake
      Water temperature is around 70 degrees. Water clarity is 3 feet. Bluegill - Fair: Use a small jig tipped with crawler along the dam and off the jetties. Most of the fish are 6-7 inches. Look for fish to move closer to shore and the males sitting on nests. Yellow Smoke Park Lake
      Bluegill - Fair: Find bluegill spawning in the arm north of the swim beach and in the coves along the south shore. Yellow Smoke is known for its big bluegill consistently reaching 9 inches or more.  Water temperatures in Black Hawk District lakes are around 70 degrees. Bluegill are starting to move close to shore in many lakes and ponds. For more information, contact the Black Hawk District office at 712-657-2638. Clear Lake
      Surface water temperature is 67 degrees. Black Crappie - Good: Crappies are biting. Use a small jig or a minnow in the rush beds and areas with vegetation. Walleye - Good: Try a slip bobber and leeches fished in the rocky reefs. Yellow Bass - Fair: Yellows bass are on the rocky areas to spawn. Use a small jig in the early morning. Channel Catfish - Fair: With recent rains, any spot where water is entering the lake is worth trying for catfish. Fish a dead chub or crawlers on the bottom. The best bite is late evening.  Crystal Lake
      Channel Catfish - Fair: Use nightcrawlers fished from shore. Walleye – Slow. Black Bullhead - Fair: Try nightcrawlers fished from shore. Bluegill – Slow: Bluegill are biting. Use a small piece of crawler and a bobber in 2 to 3 feet of water.  Lake Smith
      Largemouth Bass - Good: Largemouth bass are biting on a variety of baits. Bluegill – Fair. Rice Lake
      Largemouth Bass - Fair: Bass are biting on plastic baits. Bluegill - Fair: Use a small piece of crawler and a bobber in the edge of the vegetation.  Silver Lake (Worth)
      Largemouth Bass - Good: Largemouth bass are biting on plastic baits. Bluegill - Fair: Use a small piece of crawler and a bobber in 2 to 3 feet of water.  For information on the lakes and rivers in the north central area, contact the Clear Lake Fish and Wildlife office at 641-357-3517.  Center Lake
      Black Crappie - Fair: Cast mini jigs in shallow water wood habitat.  East Okoboji Lake
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      Channel Catfish - Good: Use traditional baits during evening hours. Walleye - Fair: Action is picking up with numbers of angler acceptable size and larger being caught.  Lost Island Lake
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      Walleye - Fair: Report of large fish being caught during the late evening hours. Cast a white twister for the best action. Black Bullhead - Good: Good action reported of angler acceptable sized fish. Yellow Perch - Fair: Some activity reported.  Spirit Lake
      Marble Beach campground, including the boat ramp, is closed for the season for renovation. Smallmouth Bass - Good: Use a jig tipped with a minnow in shallow rock structures. Action is best during sunny, calm days. Black Crappie - Good: Fish the bulrush on the lake for spawning crappie. Cast a mini-jig and swim the bait slowly back to the boat to find active fish. Walleye - Good: Best action is during the night off the docks. Fish leeches under a bobber or cast a twister tail. Black Bullhead - Good: The bite has slowed at the north grade; persistence will be rewarded with good numbers of fish caught. Fish traditional baits on the bottom. Trumbull Lake
      Northern Pike - Fair: Use casting spoons below the spillway.  West Okoboji Lake
      Bluegill - Good: Wooden docks in deeper water and new aquatic growth will produce good numbers of angler acceptable sized fish.  For more information throughout the week, contact the Spirit Lake Fish Hatchery at 712-336-1840.