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deerhunter10

pump or semi auto?

17 posts in this topic

Looking for a new shotgun to use for deer this season, trying to decide between a pump and a semi auto. Most of the hunting I do is still hunting and drives so not sure what will work best leaning towards a remington. Any suggestions would help.

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I dont deer hunt with a shotgun but I'd say pump for the same reasons I choose a bolt action rifle. Slightly higher velocities and potentially more accurate. I'm more of a one shot one kill hunter and I dont think I need an autoloader to do the job. Plus an 870 is cheap compared to most other good semi's.

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I shoot a Reminton 1100 12 guage slug gun with a cantilever scope mount and nikon 2x7 scope. I like the accuracy of the gun, virtually one hole groups at 50 yards. I am happy with the accuracy even with it being an automatic. One thing to consider with the high velocity sabot slugs is these things kick hard. I have broken one scope in the first 10 rounds, the second scope has held up better. I haven't shot a twenty guage slug gun yet, but I would consider one of these for less recoil. Another option would be the 11-87 which is a little more expensive, heavier and probolby less recoil as well if looking to stay with a 12 guage. All in all I am happy with the gun I have, and as long as it keeps the groups tight I am happy with it.

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I have both an 1100 and 870. The 870 is the main gun with the 1100 as back up. The 870 will stand up to the punishment and mother nature a little better than the autos. Both guns I hunt with are 1960's made guns the 1100 in 67 the 870 in 68. The 870 with a Hastings barrel and topped with a Red Dot is deadly out to 150

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I shoot a winchester 1300 pump as my deer gun, I've had semiauto's do weird stuff in sub zero temps so I quit using them. It might have just been the guns though, mainly, the action gets real stiff in cold, cold weather. I don't want a machinery malfunction on a follow up shot if need be. However, with normal temps, my semiauto performed flawlessly. The pump, performs no matter what.

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If you buy a quality auto, you will have no reliability problems. My Beretta is over 10,000 rounds, my dad is close behind. No problems with either. I know many more people that have the same experience. There is no, I repeat, NO difference in accuracy between pumps and autos, especially with cantilever scope mounts. The sighting system is attached to the barrel, thus action is irrelevant. Gas autos absorb some of the recoil, which is a benefit of autos. I have had my 870 jam many times and have witnessed it with others as well.

I am not a fan of the 1100s, nor the 1187s. Dad had an 1100, I had a 1187. Heavy, jamming critters they were.

As noted above, with a Hastings barrel, we are extremely accurate. Under 2" groups at 100 yards is the norm.

Good luck and dont shy away from a quality auto.

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cody, I have a Berretta AL390 with a hastings barrel. It is absolutely flawless, until it gets extremely cold, well below freezing. I have tried every kind of oil and dry lube, the action still gets slow. I never have that problem with my pump. I let my brother in law use it during the deer season. I stick with my winchester 1300 because it just feels right going after deer with it. Maybe this year I'll switch. There are many good semiautos out there, my uncles AL390 with the cantilever hastings is good out to 200 yards with partition golds. He has never had trouble. My old browning A500 was horendous in cold weather. I dumped it and bought the beretta probably 10 years ago. The same year I found the 1300 combo for as much as the beretta slug barrel, and I didn't abuse the beretta in the brush deer hunting. Thats the main reason I don't use it, last year I found a hastings barrel for a good price, so I bought it. I was very tempted to use it, but didn't. My brother-in-law did and shot a nice dow with it, no problems.

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The problem with buying a "quality" auto for slug season, is price, for alot of people dropping over $1000 to shoot at a few deer is out of the question. I would look to a pump gun, 870's are my choice, but find whatever you like. When pumps do jam it is normally related to operator error- no pumping far enough is the normal culprit. I would recommend a low power or Red dot scope for your slug gun, most guns can bring a group down to a few inches at 50 yds with the right slug and a smooth barrel. If you take most of your shots from 75-125 yds, a rifled barrel and scope are the way to go.

As far as which is more accurate, pump or auto, I would say there is no differnce, they all lock up about the same and shotgun slugs are not the precision tool that a rifle is.

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I use pretty much the same thing as Esox Magnum. I would say the pump is more accurate for a hunter that has not shot much. When one has an auto, they believe that they have plenty of shots and can do it fast. learning to make one clean shot will make you a better shot.. I started out with a single shot shotgun for birds and it helped.

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I would take a pump. Hard to jam, and with our weather its either 70 degrees, or -20 with snow. Most auto's don't like cold and wet. Plus pumps are 175-250 compared to a grand.

We shot shotguns up until a couple years ago. I would take a pump. If you are worried about how accurate get the rifled barrel and sabots. They are somewhat expensive but supposedly worth it. I had a pump 20ga with the regular $2 buck a box shells. Shot plenty of deer, several around 200yds.

If you don't mind the one shot, I would use a muzzleloader. I can get 2-3in groups at 100yds without a scope. If we ever go back to shotguns here i am going to the smokepole. They are pretty cheap and all the ones i have had shoot like a dream. Shot my buck at 170yds last year with it.

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I can shoot my 870 qiucker and more accurately than my benelli M1 super 90. but i grew up on a pump, that slight muzzle drop when the bolt goes forward throws me off. I will say that my 870 is a tough gun I've been hammering out at least 1000 shells a year for the last 7 yrs with out a problem. i shoot trap and hunt with it.

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I also seem quicker with my 870 vs. my browning A5 and I know I am more accurate.

I guess it comes down to whatever makes you more comfortable.

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The original post indicates a preferance toward Remington. Pumps are less expensive than autos but has anyone priced a Wingmaster lately? Cheap is not an acurate description.

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I go along with killincarp. I've shoot it for more than 25 years with no proplems. Use it just for deer with open sight. Besides my wife bought it for me with out asking me. I'll never get rid of it. Best gun I ever had.

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I have an 870 and a Benelli Montefeltro semi auto. I like the Benelli WAY more. Sure, the Benelli is twice as expensive but the performance definitely comes with it. Lighter, nicer looking, incredibly simple to break down, never had any problems with the action or anything. When you're carrying the gun all day out pheasant hunting, it makes a huge difference. The Benelli shoots a turkey load great out of a extended choke, and is awesome for upland birds. I used it for deer last year (no slug barrel, just the standard factory one) with a BSquare scope and it puts 5 shots inside a dinner plate at 60 yards very consistently, even without a slug barrel. Sounds like you're just looking to use it for deer? If you plan on being more versatile I'd get something like the Benelli or a Beretta semi-auto, but if you just want a slug gun - get the 870. That's just my .02.

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everyone in our party has gone down from 12 ga to 20 ga. We like the lighter guns and have found no measurable decrease in the lethality of 20 over the 12s. Those light 20s really make a difference after a day of driving deer.

You can't really go wrong with an 870, but my old man shoots and loves his 1100. I am eyeing a benelli M2, as the auto is lighter than my current 870. Its a spendy gun though.

You cant really go wrong with an 870, especially for driving deer. You probably don't even need a scope for shooting those runners.

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