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habersplat

nightcrawlers under the ice ?

12 posts in this topic

Has anyone tried to use nightcrawlers in the winter if so do they work ?

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I was wondering the same thing but with leaches. I have never used nighcrawlers in the winter, but I dont understand why they wouldnt work.

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You would have to put treble hooks on and fish them like long thin jigging rap laugh being frozen and all. Bet ya they would have a lot of action if frozen in a curve be like a chuby darter but actualy catch fish.

I always wondered the same thing. But where would you find them?

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My dad told me they used to use them all the time. I tried once and did not have any luck but that day nothing was working.

I suspect they collected the worms in the fall and kept them for ice fishing to save money.

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First, they are almost impossible to find.

Second, one thing that gets alot of fish to bite on leeches and crawlers is the action they make on the hook. I heard in the cold water during the winter the curl up on the hook.

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We try and get them all winter long and use them specifically for speckle trout (brook trout ) . Quite often if you only get one bite of the day it will be on the tipup with the worm .

TD

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I was out with my uncle on first ice last fall and he had some crawlers left from open water season he thought he would try for some sunfish and ended up hammering the walleyes but early ice is hot action and maybe they would have gone for about anything. I was jigging a minnow 50 yards away a did good too.

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they work good for cold water SW mn sunnies (bullheads) haha

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I used them with quite a bit of luck on LOW last year. Non frozen on a buckshot. caught a number of eyes on them/

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walmart has them year round. I have used them beore when we didnt have anything else ans thats what walmart had. They didnt work that great but werent terrible. I`d rather use them than mealworms.

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I was wondering the same thing but with leaches. I have never used nighcrawlers in the winter, but I dont understand why they wouldnt work.

They curl up into a ball on the hook and never come out.

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Yeah, leeches won't do anything until the water temp is over 50 degrees. My dad tried crawlers for lake trout once, but didn't catch anything...but then again, we only caught 1 trout that whole weekend.

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