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Pope and Young Scoring Questions?


Fish- N- Hunt

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I am curious on how to score a rack. Is it like the following listed below?

Measure main beams

Measure tine lengths

Measure circumferences in between tines

Measure inside spread

Deduct the differences between sides

Is this correct?

I have heard also that you measure tip to tip and greatest outside spread. Is this just a myth?

Any help on this will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Fish- N- Hunt

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You pretty much have it, don't forget about the circumference between the burr and the G1, and the outside spread cannot be greater than the main beam length. The outside spread doesn't factor into the score. All measurements done to the nearest 1/8", subtract differences and there you have it.

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Thanks for the input. I am still a little confused though. If the outside spread doesn't count on to your final score, why would they even have you measure it then? Does tip to tip add onto your final score? The reason I am asking this question, is because I shot an eight pointer tuesday night, that has a possibility of making pope&young. The way it sits right now without tip to tip or outside spread, I am sitting at about a score of 115. I need to use at least one of these measurements to make it across the mark. Thanks again

Fish- N- Hunt

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Also, if the inside spread is less than the measurement of the longest main beam, the spread measurement must be used instead, if the spread is greater than the measurement of the longest main beam, the beam measurement must be used.

Got to Pope and Young HSOforum, they have downloadable scoring sheets that are easy to follow.

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If the inside spread is greater than the longest beam you can't add it in.

IMG_2494.jpg

Here's a couple 8 points for you to compare. Both have inside speads at 15 inches. The full head is 117 and the other is 111. It takes a pretty big 8 point to make the book.

SCORE SHEETS

http://www.pope-young.org/scoresheets.asp

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also remember you always get 4 circumfrances. If a typical 8 you take 1/2 the distance from the g3 out to the tip. Place a mark and measure this circumfrance. Add this circumfrance at that point. Even a spike gets four circumfrance measurements. Allthough you cannot take more then 4 either.

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I totally agree eyeguy54, it definitely takes one heck of an 8 ptr to make P&Y. I was going to say that shoulder mount buck was in the 120 range. I shot a beautiful 9 ptr in Iowa in Nov. 2000 that just missed book. He had a double browtine and that deduction put him at 117. I believe he scored 127 w/o the deduction. Oh well, he's still a heck of a buck and on my wall and that's what counts!!!

Brian

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I have 2 clarification questions. I'm not a scorer, but thought I had this down more than it sounds.

1. Do you always get 4 circumferences? I thought you got 3 if it's an 8 pt. and 4 of it's 10 pts. or bigger, but never more than 4. I thought you take circumferences at the base and between each point, but not at the end of a main beam for an 8 pt.

2. On the main beam/spread caveat mentioned above, my understanding was that if the main beam isn't longer than the spread, then you get the longest main beam for your spread measurement. This would come into play when a buck grows short main beams that go straight out and result in a abnormal inside spread.

Can anyone that is an expert clarify some of these scoring issues.

Thanks.

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B. Mac, I am no expert but have measured a couple of deer for myself and think I can answer your questions.

1. The number of circumference measurements is always 4 per side, 1st is between the bur and the brow time, second between the brow and the G1, so on and so forth, I think if it's an eight pointer the fourth measurement is taken midway between the G3 and the tip of the main beam.

2. If the inside spread is greater than the length of the longest main beam, the main beam length must be used for the spread credit. If it is less than the beam length the actual spread measurement is used.

Hope that helps.

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actually, regardless of the number of points, you get four circumference measurements per side

all circumference measurements are taken at the smallest measurement between two tines or at designated spots along the main beam if the buck has eight or fewer points. if it's an 8-pointer then your fourth circumference is taken halfway between the end of the main beam and the third point

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I believe spread credit is a credit only if smaller than longest maim beam or equal to.

Example, 16 in inside spread and 15 inch main beams. with one 16 or

larger main beam credit for inside spread would be 16.

16 inch inside spread and 18 inch main beam credit would be 16.

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Correct, but either way you use a spread measurement in the total score, it just depends if it less than or greater than the longest main beam length. If the main beams are 15 inches and the spread is 16 inches, you use 15 inches as your spread measurement. Here would be the total measurements used in scoring the rack:

Main beam

Main beam

Inside spread

Total circumferences

Total lenght of scorable points

Total difference of measurements

That is your gross score.

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