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Boat Cover Support

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I have a 16' Lund Fishing Boat that I store outside. It is your classic bench seat lund boat. I cannot seem to find a way to keep the boat cover supported. This makes the water pool in my cover. Making the boat cover not last very long.

I am looking for anyone who has used a boat cover support system that actually works.

I have tried plastic stands to hold up the cover ( Failed got pooled water )

Any help or information is appreciated.

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Could you stage a 2x4 or some sort of pole in there to keep the canvas poked up? That is the way that my custom cover is done. 1 pole in front, 1 pole in back. They used some adjustable poles with a rubber boot on the bottom for some grip.

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In the Winter I use a big plastic tarp and the 2x4 ridge pole somewhat like you describe. Usually I screw it to 2 2x6 as support and use straps to cinch it down.

I might try the hinges next year though.

I was hoping for something easier and quicker to take off for the summer boating season.

Thanks for the information

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You can make a couple of T's to hold up the top front and back. Easy to make and install

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I've tied a rope around the top of the motor and put the rope on top of the seats and then tied the other end to the front of the boat.

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My dads got like a 1970 something 14' alumacraft and that thing has some aluminum tent poles that form a V shape over the boat and go in the oar locks and his cover goes over that.

Maybe you could rig up something with some 1/2" or 3/4" pvc Pipe that goes in and out quickly? You would just need to attach a couple of bases for the poles to sit in on the edges of your boat.

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Hope this makes sense:

1) Make two (or three) support poles out of 3" pvc, cut to the proper height needed to make the rain run off.

2) Get the round 3" PVC end caps to put on the top of them that will be touching the cover. This will keep and sharp edges from touching the cover.

3) Drill two - 1/2" holes through the end caps (while mounted on the support poles) towards the top of the cap that you can pass a rope through from front to back.

4) Get a 1/2" thick rope and make a large loop (that wont slide) on one end that will fit over your motor. Put the loop over the motor and then run the rope through the first pole and tie knots on both sides of the first pole so it does move once it's in the proper location. Repeat that for the second (possibly third) poles. This will keep the poles properly spaced apart every time you remove it. Finally make a second LARGE loop that will pull down over the bow (one side of loop on each side of boat). You can then attach a pull strap (like a ratchet strap without the ratchet) to the end of the loop and the boat trailer and pull the whole support system snug. With using a pull strap it's easy to take down with no knots to take out.

You could also add the flat PVC flange sections to the bottom of the poles if you needed any additional support.

I still tilt the front end up as much as possible.....which helps. My cover is old and stretched...so it needs the extra help.

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I took sheets of plywood cut to fit gunnal ran a 2x4 on edge down the center under the ply with a few uprights to the floor,then tarp it for winter.I had the same sagging and rotted, molded, mildewy tarp.Then I raise the front as high as possibly to let floage easily happen.I tried the poles and it sagged between them also! Thats when I went a solid ply with tarp over.

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I'm also looking for the answer to this original question. Any good/bad experience with those fiberglass slats that go into a bracket on each gunwale and then bend upward to create a roof for your cover?

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I'm also looking for the answer to this original question. Any good/bad experience with those fiberglass slats that go into a bracket on each gunwale and then bend upward to create a roof for your cover?

I guess I don't know overall, but the guy we fish with used to have the supports you mention. He has since had a new cover made and it uses 3 vertical supports down the middle, and he mentioned that most were like that now. Not sure if thats really how it is now or not.

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Regarding the fiberglass bows.

I have used them for years without issue until recently.

I had a heavy canvas type cover for the boat and used the fiberglass bows for years trailering and storing without issue. During the winter I needed to put some bracing under them because the snow could collapse them but with a little prep for winter it was not a problem.

After my canvas cover finally rotted enough to require a replacement I went with a cheap loose fitting cover generally available at fleet farm because of $$ shortfalls. With the looser fitting cover it actually created more drag as the cover sagged between the bows until on a nice windy day trailering up north the bows twisted and popped out of place also slicing a nice hole in the cover. The cover preceded to flap and destroy itself on that trip. The bows were also destroyed as the ends splintered when they twisted.

My point??? The bows worked great for years but use them with a quality cover made for trailering and they will work for years for you. Also, don't expect them to hold up snow without reinforcement.

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Hope this makes sense:

1) Make two (or three) support poles out of 3" pvc, cut to the proper height needed to make the rain run off.

2) Get the round 3" PVC end caps to put on the top of them that will be touching the cover. This will keep and sharp edges from touching the cover.

3) Drill two - 1/2" holes through the end caps (while mounted on the support poles) towards the top of the cap that you can pass a rope through from front to back.

4) Get a 1/2" thick rope and make a large loop (that wont slide) on one end that will fit over your motor. Put the loop over the motor and then run the rope through the first pole and tie knots on both sides of the first pole so it does move once it's in the proper location. Repeat that for the second (possibly third) poles. This will keep the poles properly spaced apart every time you remove it. Finally make a second LARGE loop that will pull down over the bow (one side of loop on each side of boat). You can then attach a pull strap (like a ratchet strap without the ratchet) to the end of the loop and the boat trailer and pull the whole support system snug. With using a pull strap it's easy to take down with no knots to take out.

You could also add the flat PVC flange sections to the bottom of the poles if you needed any additional support.

I still tilt the front end up as much as possible.....which helps. My cover is old and stretched...so it needs the extra help.

I did the same thing...only I used PVC T shaped ends instead of the caps. I just run the rope through the T pieces. That way I didn't have to drill any holes. My cover also was made of a vinyl type material with a fuzzy underside that stuck to velcro. So I also put a piece of velcro with adhesive backing, on the top of each pole so they didn't move at all. I would tie the rope down by the prop of the motor and run it over the top of the motor and thru the poles and tie it to one of those zig zag type anchor rope holders that I mounted on the bow. Then I would put the cover over that. When I stored it over the winter, (outside) I would put a plastic tarp over the whole thing.

Nels

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