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fishermatt

best way of getting a solid shower head installation

10 posts in this topic

I'm connecting my cabin shower, and want to make sure the top part of the pipe doesn't move when the shower head is adjusted thousands of times over the next umpteen years (hopefully). Is there a "best way" to use bracing etc. to get a solid installation?

thanks

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Run a 2x4 between the studs were the water pipe is coming up the inside wall. Secure the pipe about 8" down from were the pipe comes out of the wall using a 1/2 copper u clamp. If you want to you can put a little soider there to.

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Secure a a "drop ear ell" to the framing. it's 1/2" iron pipe thread on one side and 1/2" sweat copper on the other, made of brass.

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Run a 2x4 between the studs were the water pipe is coming up the inside wall. Secure the pipe about 8" down from were the pipe comes out of the wall using a 1/2 copper u clamp. If you want to you can put a little soider there to.

Ditto.

Quick, Easy, Cheap, and Effective. What else could you ask for?

I suppose the above statement does assume that you have open access to the studs and the pipe.

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Sorry, I didn't mention that I'm using Pex and not copper, and I have a feeling that'll make a difference?

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Finish your pex with copper and add the 2x4 with U.

Copper also is ionized and kills some bacteria,I'll be using PEX also soon and will use copper in the beginings and ends of all lines,just for bacterial control.

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Sorry, I didn't mention that I'm using Pex and not copper, and I have a feeling that'll make a difference?

No idea why but you are not supposed to use PEX from the valve to the shower head or the valve to the tub spout.

Run copper from the valve up to a drop ear as suggested before and thread the shower arm into that. A drop ear is just a 90 degree elbow made of brass with two screw holes to mount it to a stud or 2x4 block.

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you can use PEX. they have a brass PEX drop eared ell too.

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Dakotakid...not questioning you but the last 3 shower valves I installed said no PEX from Valve to head or Valve to spout....2 Delta and 1 Moen. Now this was in the valve instructions and not from PEX or anything like that. I just assumed that they were all that way or it was code or something.

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I can't imagine why you couldn't use pex or any other plastic piping from the shower valve on. It's not under any real pressure since the shower head is an opening. Pex is approved for installation under static pressure. Probably just a disclaimer the manufacture puts in trying to absolve them of any liability if it should leak and cause a lot of water damage.

I personally don't care for the plastic water lines but copper is so expensive these days that there really isn't a lot of other options. I agree with what Da' Kid said, put in a pex to Iron pipe drop eared ell. and secure it well with a two by four using the holes on the side of the ell. Use screws, not nails. This should make the shower head plenty sturdy. Stay away from anything called a wall nut. The company I work for made the mistake of putting these in a hotel. Easy to put in but they aren't solid and they leak after time. We are still going on calls to repair them. Saved some time on the install but man are we paying for it it now.

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