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beef

My Hunting Buddy

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Ahh shucks... I thought I would start another topic...

STCATFISH Call me when you get the chance

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Great Pics guys. Here's my Marli..

BTW- What is with my camera? Notice how terrible these pictures are? It's a Kodak EasyShare. I bought it mainly for hunting and fishing, therefore I really didn't want to break the bank, but shouldn't it take better pictures than this? Is there a setting I can adjust? It's currently set for 4.0 mega pixels.

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Rost, I missed your earlier post where you were asking what was wrong with your camera. Answer is: nothing.

Shooting into the bright sky like you did in the first one threw off your camera's light meter, and the flare from the sunny portion put a gauzy cast over the image. Beef's third dog image, if you take a look, suffers a bit from the same effect. In your other two images, it looks like your flash wasn't strong enough to illuminate the whole scene well, and of course all the circles in the images are from raindrops or snowflakes catching the flash. Even more sophisticated light meters than the one in your little camera can be thrown off when shooting flash in the rain and snow. Probably the camera gave you enough flash to expose the bright spots but underexpose the shadows. That's why the dog is so full of digital noise on the last two. Underexposed shadows get that way in digital photos, especially at iso400 and above with the tiny sensors in point-and-shoot digital cameras.

In flash situations especially, make sure your batteries have a full strong charge so they can pop that flash to its full extent. And try to leave your iso at 200, not higher, unless you really need to boost it up.

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