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leechmann

WHOPPER STRAWBERRIES

21 posts in this topic

Gurney's just sent out a pamphlet for wild strawberries. They advertize that they get as big a peeches. Has anyone every tried them, wondering if they do well in Northern MN and if they are hardy enough to make it through the winter?

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You should be able just to call and ask. Don't tell them where your are calling from just ask them how far north they will grow. I know a few big name nurseries here in the cities sell plants that are known for not being hardy in the Twin Cities. Plants the Arboretum stores inside over the winter.

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If they are zones 5-10 I wouldn't waste time with them anywhere in MN. Those new zone maps are too controversial. A lot of people don't believe the new zone maps are accurate and still believe the original zone maps are accurate.

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I think $20.00 for 50 plants is worth the gamble. I'm going to give it a try and I'll let you folks know what happens.

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I get Gurney's email news letter and had to go check their HSOforum out especially the sweetcorn. If you do plant them make sure you cover them up real good with straw over winter and that should help immensely. Yea they look huge.

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I think your right. I'll take real good care of them and see what happens.

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I blow 6 inches of leaves on my strawberries just before freeze up every fall.The leaves are still green under there today.Be carefull not to cover them to deep or they will suffocate.

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K, I'm thinking I'll use some straw, and puff it up real good so it has lots of insulating value. Thanks

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I cover mine with that years corn stalks.Acts like snow fencing and holds the snow in place.

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The whopper strawberries were delivered yesterday. Can't wait to get them in the ground. Temps still freezing at night. Should I just keep roots moist until temps warm up?

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Freezing temps won't hurt them.Only if they are blossoming.They won't do that for a couple weeks anyway.If they are everbearers.....Pick off the first blossoms until the start again in late July.....early August.Then let them bear fruit.whoppers are June bearing aren't they.You won't get any berries until next year if they are.

You can plant them as soon as you are able to work up the ground.

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Thanks Ken, I just got them planted. I was out there planting them in the freezing rain. Very Imppressive. I planted some onion set yesterday and a deer came along last night and pulled them all out, and ate of all the new green growth. Any ideas besides a good venison recipe?

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scare crow.. might work for a while with loose baggy clothes you have worn.. scent will keep them away for a while plus make the arms loos so they move in the wind..

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I'm going to dig mine out and start over last only got about 2 cups, after moving them 2yrs ago. Going to add more topsoil, to the garden bed, from compost. May need to get going on finishing this spring.

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Well, here are the whopper Strawberry plants. They seem extremely hardy and it looks like they are going to bloom soon. I know you are supposed to nip the blooms off the first year, but I'm thinking I'm going to let them go. [img:center]http://1001950.jpg

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I wouldn't let more than 1 berry per plant.They are still pretty small.I planted 50 new Fort Larimie's and they are just starting to blossom.I'm picking all of them off until August.You want the plant to put it's energy into growing.It makes them able to withstand winter better.

Winter is what makes plants hardy or not.

Be sure to cover them this fall.I use cornstalks from my garden.Straw also works well.....stay away from hay though.Or you will be putting lots of weed seeds into your patch.

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Hey thanks Ken. I know your right. I'm just having a hard time thinking I'm not going to have any strawberries until later. I like the idea of 1 peach size berry per plant. I have about 100 plants, so thats 100 delicious berries. Thanks again Ken

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Yeah,I know it's tough.It's also why a lot of people don't thin out veggies in thier gardens.You just have to grit your teeth and do it.

The first berry to show on the tip of the cluster is the King fruit.That's the one you want to leave on.

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