Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
leechmann

WHOPPER STRAWBERRIES

21 posts in this topic

Gurney's just sent out a pamphlet for wild strawberries. They advertize that they get as big a peeches. Has anyone every tried them, wondering if they do well in Northern MN and if they are hardy enough to make it through the winter?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should be able just to call and ask. Don't tell them where your are calling from just ask them how far north they will grow. I know a few big name nurseries here in the cities sell plants that are known for not being hardy in the Twin Cities. Plants the Arboretum stores inside over the winter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they are zones 5-10 I wouldn't waste time with them anywhere in MN. Those new zone maps are too controversial. A lot of people don't believe the new zone maps are accurate and still believe the original zone maps are accurate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think $20.00 for 50 plants is worth the gamble. I'm going to give it a try and I'll let you folks know what happens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I get Gurney's email news letter and had to go check their HSOforum out especially the sweetcorn. If you do plant them make sure you cover them up real good with straw over winter and that should help immensely. Yea they look huge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think your right. I'll take real good care of them and see what happens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I blow 6 inches of leaves on my strawberries just before freeze up every fall.The leaves are still green under there today.Be carefull not to cover them to deep or they will suffocate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

K, I'm thinking I'll use some straw, and puff it up real good so it has lots of insulating value. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cover mine with that years corn stalks.Acts like snow fencing and holds the snow in place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The whopper strawberries were delivered yesterday. Can't wait to get them in the ground. Temps still freezing at night. Should I just keep roots moist until temps warm up?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Freezing temps won't hurt them.Only if they are blossoming.They won't do that for a couple weeks anyway.If they are everbearers.....Pick off the first blossoms until the start again in late July.....early August.Then let them bear fruit.whoppers are June bearing aren't they.You won't get any berries until next year if they are.

You can plant them as soon as you are able to work up the ground.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Ken, I just got them planted. I was out there planting them in the freezing rain. Very Imppressive. I planted some onion set yesterday and a deer came along last night and pulled them all out, and ate of all the new green growth. Any ideas besides a good venison recipe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

scare crow.. might work for a while with loose baggy clothes you have worn.. scent will keep them away for a while plus make the arms loos so they move in the wind..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to dig mine out and start over last only got about 2 cups, after moving them 2yrs ago. Going to add more topsoil, to the garden bed, from compost. May need to get going on finishing this spring.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, here are the whopper Strawberry plants. They seem extremely hardy and it looks like they are going to bloom soon. I know you are supposed to nip the blooms off the first year, but I'm thinking I'm going to let them go. [img:center]http://1001950.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't let more than 1 berry per plant.They are still pretty small.I planted 50 new Fort Larimie's and they are just starting to blossom.I'm picking all of them off until August.You want the plant to put it's energy into growing.It makes them able to withstand winter better.

Winter is what makes plants hardy or not.

Be sure to cover them this fall.I use cornstalks from my garden.Straw also works well.....stay away from hay though.Or you will be putting lots of weed seeds into your patch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey thanks Ken. I know your right. I'm just having a hard time thinking I'm not going to have any strawberries until later. I like the idea of 1 peach size berry per plant. I have about 100 plants, so thats 100 delicious berries. Thanks again Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah,I know it's tough.It's also why a lot of people don't thin out veggies in thier gardens.You just have to grit your teeth and do it.

The first berry to show on the tip of the cluster is the King fruit.That's the one you want to leave on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • How can a bird with brain the size of a pea out smart us!
    • The 2 lakes i bass fish have slowed way down the last week.   A swim-bait ripple shad was hot ticket for a while but that is just a pike attraction right now.  Been switching to a Senko and helped a little.   Pads are coming up fast now and we should see a spike up in activity soon.  Cannot wait to throw the frogs soon as that is the biggest rush watching those eruptions in the water!!   Thanks for posting as i found it to be quite slower than usual also.   Which means i need to find better ammo during those times.  
    • Tomorrow we will be back at it
    • I am giving it a last hurrah tomorrow. Sorry I haven't been able to check in here much. I have hardly been able to get out this year between work, a baby at home, and a recent trip out of the country for a relative's wedding.    Last time I was out I had a real nice Tom within 20 yards after a very long standoff. I think I screwed it up by rushing myself a bit. He stood around 50 yards out literally strutting back and forth like someone had drawn a line in the mud that he wouldnt cross. He must not have wanted to fight with the strutter decoy we had out. He did that for 45 minutes to an hour and finally came our way after a hen led him towards us.    They came past us but were outside the decoys and angling slightly away from us. Then the tom turned and started angling straight at the strutter decoy. That meant he was basically quartering to me and when he was 15-17 yards or so out I drew because in the back of my mind i was thinking if he kept moving that way and past the decoy he would quickly be in a spot I would have had no shot.   In hindsight I think he had realized (once he got close enough) that he would have been able to whoop up on the decoy and he was coming in to do just that. I probably should have waited to see, but I didn't and right as I hit the backwall of my draw his head popped up on alert and he turned around and walked straight away knowing something wasn't quite right. I could have easily shot at him at 20 yards but he was facing away and I just didn't feel comfortable. I am confident I would have hit my mark but I didn't like shooting at something walking straight away when I am not experienced with bow hunting turkeys.   I know some people will say that I should have shot, but I have been bow hunting for awhile and never wounded anything because of a poor shot or poor shot selection, so I didn't want that to be a first. Hopefully I get a shot at redemption tomorrow!
    • Way to go team!! I sure took the avg score down with my jake
    • nice story, fishing has a way of easing the pains we have. even when we hurt like crazy when done for the day we are looking forward to the next outing.
    • way to go, guys yep, the toms not about to give up even though its close to closing time have seen several strutters the past couple weeks and heard gobbles yesterday while fishing
    • great job. makes it 5 for 5 for team 5 congrats on a nice tom, 57 and that willl give our team score a boost
    • One More Cast      Photo by:  Roger Abraham   If any of you out there are regular readers of my tales, you have followed my recent struggles with back and knees.  I can’t put a name to this drive I have to be on the stream as of late.  It borders on obsession. I guess in my mind if I am healthy enough to fish the world is right with me and I am not getting old and feeble.      Today I was a witness to that I am not the only one.  Lots of anglers and hunters live to go out into the outdoors. .  It is what drives them.  It makes them feel alive.  It is their passion.  I told my fishing buddy Abe today my thoughts.  I told him how I was feeling a little old.  I guess my 60th birthday coming up next month makes me feel mortal.  Abe laughed and said I was a young buck compared to him.  Abe turns 76 this year.     Abe told me tales about catching big trout in tiny streams in Wisconsin and out west.  The twinkle in his eye when he reminisced I had seen before in many trout anglers.      We fished a stretch for 2 hours.  I sat down and rested often.  Abe kept on fishing. He got hung up in a box elder branch and lost a lure.  Abe told me box elders trees were his nemesis when he fished.   He asked me which tree was my kryptonite.  I told him, "ones with branches."  We both had a chuckle and continued fishing.   I thought to myself this guy is really driven.  I hope I am like him at 76.     We got to the vehicle and Abe wanted to continue fishing.  Abe’s waders sprang a leak earlier and he fell in the water a couple times.  He was quite wet.  He wanted to change in to dry clothes before we continue.  Abe peeled off his wet shirt and there were two things stuck to his chest.  He could tell by my questioning look he needed to tell me what was up.     Abe told me he had been having heart problems lately and he was supposed to be wearing a heart monitor.  He left it in the car because he was afraid of getting the electronics wet.  Here I have been whining about being old and the guy I was fishing with left his heart monitor in his vehicle.      Abe reassured me that he was in no danger and he could continue fishing.  I started brainstorming on a place to fish where it was not so hard walking.  Now that I knew he was not as healthy as he looked I wanted an easy place to fish.  I knew the place and it was upstream 5 miles.     We arrived at the well manicured field.  It looked like a golf green.  I picked the area because the farmer kept sheep and goats on the land and the weeds and brush were gone because of the goats.  We walked and fished.     Abe told tales of the old days and of fish lost and landed.  I walked a little forward to fish and looked back to check up on Abe.  What I saw when I looked back scared me and I immediately asked Abe if he was ok.  Abe was laying flat on the ground face down.  I thought the worst and he could tell by my face.  He told me to calm down.  His back was acting up and he needed to straight it out and that was the best way to do it.   We fished a little bit more and he took a photo of me.  He liked the lighting. He told me it captured the essence of trout fishing.  He did not have a camera.  I let him use mine.  He was not camera savvy and needed an impromptu lesson on how to use it.   We drove to his car and we talked about our love of the outdoors. We shook hands and headed our separate ways and promised to fish again soon.  As I drove home I smiled and thought about how I am going to be when I am 76.  I hope I am like Abe and my eyes still twinkle when I talk of chasing trout and I am still driven to make one more cast.
    • The past week has had me having multiple close calls and missing a brute at 45 yards.  Tonight I talked my dad to give it another try and there were birds in the field when we got there.  Birds ended up leaving as we tried to sneak in.  A short 20 minutes later they were back and we watched and worked the big group of toms and hens for more than 2 hours before we got one to commit.  Dad shot him with his 20 gauge at 48 yards,(this thing shoots an awesome pattern).  The 3 year old was down and only flopped a few times.   Nice 1+ inch spurs, 10" beard and heavy.  A good evening for sure!
  • Our Sponsors