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Royce Aardahl

Planets and Moon

23 posts in this topic

Nice, dude! Really crisp. Do you mind if I post mine in this thread and others who have them do the same? It's cool either way with me.

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It was absolutely a gorgeous sight! I got done with a hockey T&I shoot just about seven and got to see it, but was already frozen enough to stand outside for another half an hour taking shots. I'll regret it tomorrow, but is sure feels good to be warm now!

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Ken, as soon as I was done shooting the great gray owl after sunset, I set up the new tripod (thanks for the birthday gift, buddy!) and waited half an hour in the comfort of my warm vehicle for both planets to emerge, and then spent 10 minutes capturing them before hopping back in the 4Runner for the ride home.

That tripod/head is a winner! A monster for sure, but a winner too. gringrin

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Quote:
I set up the new tripod

Well, I guess we'll see if it really is tough enough to hold up a car! grin

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Post away everybody! I was using my powershot, handheld, ISO 800, shutter speed 1/100, and TV setting.

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It cleared this afternoon, but I had to work until 5:30. By the time I got home and grrabbed my camera, it was dark. I tried anyay.

2008_12010003.jpg

Half hour earlier would have been awesome.

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Ok this is my first post of a photo, hopefully the photo will show smile I used a Canon XTi with 100-400 with a 1.4 tel, I wish that it didn't have the tel on, but I forgot the lens caps for it so I didn't want to take it off. 13 sec, f/6.3, 800 ISO, 140mm, with tripod. Suggestions and comments welcome, also can someone tell me why the photo got a second moon?

thanks, John

moon.jpg

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Actually John did you have a lens hood on? That might have caused that moon.

With the long exposure time you exposed the surface of the moon and got a fair amount of movement blur from the moon and planets moving. It takes a fairly fast shutter speed to stop the blur of the planets caused by the earth's rotation.

I used a 1 second exposure and even that showed just a bit of motion blur. I used settings of ISO 200, 1 second and f8 just to give you an idea. Hope that helps a bit.

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Dan, I didn't use a lens hood, but the lens did have a UV Haze filter. Does the photo look dark? I did some adjustments on my laptop before uploading the photo, but now looking at it on my pc it looks very dark.

John

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John, unless you shot at twilight it is certainly going to be a dark photo. I do think the moons and planets were exposed for a little to long of a time period. You had an ISO of 800 and 13 second exposure. I used ISO 200 and 1 second exposure with OK results.

I am almost positive the combination of no lens hood and the filter on the front caused the second moon. Filters can actually cause more flare especially with night shots like this. If it is an in-expensive brand filter they are a bit more prone to flare as well.

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Here's what I got shortly after sunset.

Canon 30D, Canon 70-200 f2.8L at 200mm, iso100, 1/30 at f2.8, Manfrotto 475B tripod/3039 head

3075848193_88c18db9fe_o.jpg

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Dang, I really like the colors you have Steve. I forgot all about this until a friend called and it was way past twilight. I wanted some blue still left in the sky but.... I did go out again around 7pm because I saw some wispy clouds come by and put some color in the moon but I was too slow to catch it.

Here is mine; 50D, 70-200/2.8 at 190mm. ISO 200, f8, 1 second.

428720339_4C9UY-L.jpg

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Dan the flare off of the lower planet is cool. I don't know if that is what the camera captured or if you added it, but if you could write a plug in for that you might make some cash. Nice job everyone. I got out too early, forgot my remote and had my old cheap tripod. I haven't downloaded any images yet, but I think I botched it up pretty good.

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Mine was with my Powershot, handheld,TV,1/60, ISO 400 20 power zoom. Fun stuff, nice pics all. Nice color steve. Under exposed or how did you get the tint?

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eyeguy, the sunset where I was cast a lot of red into the western sky.

The image was slightly overexposed, but not by much, and since I shot RAW I was able to recover the highlights when opening the image. It helped a lot that the sky was still fairly blue and bright upon capture. Later, the contrast between sky and moon/planets was much more pronounced, and that limits both the capture and what can be done in post-processing.

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Dan the flare off of the lower planet is cool. I don't know if that is what the camera captured or if you added it, but if you could write a plug in for that you might make some cash. Nice job everyone. I got out too early, forgot my remote and had my old cheap tripod. I haven't downloaded any images yet, but I think I botched it up pretty good.

Actually I didn't add that you can thank the lens for that look but it is easy enough to do in photo shop. It is on the smaller of the two as well just doesn't show up at the smaller size posted here. My understanding is it will show up at smaller f-stops and it is created by the openings in the aperture of the lens. The number of star patterns = number of blades in the lens.

I wanted a longer exposure to get some detail in the moon and make the planets a bit larger and a bit of flare off the moon crescent. I've got a few that aren't blown but they look like dots in a dark closet.

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I finally got to process my images, and this is the only one that I liked. I took my photos just after the sun slipped below the horizon, so I could only see one planet with my eye and so I framed the other one out of the shot. These events are always fun. We get to see a whole bunch of different shots of the same subject from folks all around the area. Thanks for sharing everyone. Enjoy.

SundownMoonandPlanet.jpg

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Nice one! Excellent detail in the moon. Sure makes a difference doing it shortly after sunset vs in the full dark.

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All cool pic's everyone! I haven't had much in the way of any decent photo opps on the subject as it's been cloudy for what seems like weeks now!!!

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