Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Cooter

Bowhunting opener

22 posts in this topic

So who's heading out this weekend? I'll be out on county land east of Eau Claire for the weekend - hoping for either a velvet buck or some skinheads for the freezer. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll be hunting a new farm near Somerset. It's an earn-a-buck zone so I'll be looking for "baldy". Also got a turkey permit for the same area. Saw 2 different flocks while I was scouting there Saturday!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No kiddin, I need to get my license yet also.

DonBo - I'm EAB also, again, but have a sticker from last year - which is good and bad. Good to have but bad because it means I didn't get a buck last year, oh well I'm used to that. I have a great spot for the opener, should be able to get a doe out of it hopefully. If not there is a bean field I can hunt at my uncles south of Eau Claire that the deer are hitting - a pile of apple trees to there also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never hunted in an EAB area so this will be a first for me.

Gotta love those apple trees!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hard to beleive its that time of year again. Summers seem to be getting shorter every year. I'm not ready for bow hunting at all yet. I was suppose to be going on a 2 week hunting trip up north but that didn't happen frown So now I have 2 weeks off from work. Goose hunting has been horrible in my area and fishing has been slow for me lately. Not sure what to do with all this time off.

I should go muskie fishing, or try the Brule. Maybe try some more goose hunting or maybe I will go sit in a tree stand.

Good luck to those who get out his weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the way back from the lake we fished to our cabin (20 mile drive) taking county roads we counted (well attempted to count) 65 deer (more than 20 were in a single field)! I'm not a hunter myself but I only 3 were bucks that would have been good for the taking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been seeing tons of deer in the fields south of my place. Unfortunately it's all private land. What I don't like is these people are putting in for crop damage every year but won't let anyone hunt there. Well, they let a few people during gun season but not bow hunters. Oh well, there's still plenty of deer north of me in the county land.

Good luck to you guys on the opener!!! I have to work the first 4 days, then I'll be out there (if I'm not fishing.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats the problem I run into. I can bring the family out deer watching from the car and we can count 200-300 deer an evening. To bad there all on private land. Mean while the little public land thats left is shreaded from years of the doe blast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I won't be heading out this weekend due to having to work. It's also too warm for me yet, I don't usually hunt until its cooler, usually around the first week in October. Will be hunting on our property and my parent's, all in Barron County. Only me and my husband bowhunt, we have 40 acres and my parents have about 1,000 so there shouldn't be any pressure. Been seeing lots of deer in the evenings, but not too many bucks. Put the trail cam out a couple of weeks ago, got one pic of a doe and a video of a beef cow's head right before she slammed the camera around to the back of the tree. Had it strapped to the tree. Thank goodness she didn't wreck it! Going to put it somewhere else where there isn't any cattle! Cooter, I hope that MONSTER buck in Buffalo Co. wanders over your way and you get a crack at him. That would be sweet! He could come up here but I would probably pass out if I saw him. Good luck everyone, be safe, and remember to post pics when you get something. I enjoy hearing about successful hunts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fishtrapgirl - Work? You need to get your priorities staight! I don't think that monster will make it over to Eleva, that would take one hot, elusive doe with a ton of stamina! I'm still trying to get a P&Y - meet in the freezer should begin this weekend. Must be tough with only 1,040 acres to hunt, especially when you have to share with one other person.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL, I know, it is tough because of all the grief we get for being "deer hunters". I cannot believe no one else in my family hunts. My parents raise beef, they absolutely cannot understand why my hubby and me would want to shoot a deer and then eat it. Whats funny though is I have made venison roast before and had them over for supper, they thought it was beef!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our group ended up with 2 over the weekend - the rain and full moon are good excuses for not getting more! Had a great time, which is why we do it. I'll head back to the county land in two weeks for the weekend. Until then and after it will be down at my uncle's - have a bean field and the edge I can hunt gets plenty of shade so that section should stay green for a while. Also have apple trees, corn, and acorns to hunt there, plus the wheat and rye in a little food plot in the woods. Too many options, I'll be a couple days behind those buggers as usual but should be able to get some meat and another EAB sticker before rut - need to put in for vacation time for early Nov real soon.

Fishtrapgirl - my uncle raises beef also....I like venison plenty enough but I've never had veni that can compete with a good T-bone or ribeye!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I drew a bear tag but never saw a bear.

My trail cam took pictures of a few coming in at night.

Time to concentrate on deer and Ruffed Grouse.

Hope to get one with my recurve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Too bad about not seeing any bear. I've got 7 years of putting in and didn't get one this year so I should next year, they say they're going to be issuing quite a few more. Did dogs or baiters go first this year? I don't want to put in if dogs go first.

Anyhoo, I went out last night expecting to see a lot of deer activity with the cold front moving in but only saw a doe with 2 fawns. I already filled a doe tag so I'm "horn hunting" now. There's a couple of decent bucks around but haven't been able to get close to them yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe stand hunters went first - I drew my first bear tag about 4 years ago and got skunked. Speaking of which, I need to get my app in before I forget.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad you mentioned that Cooter. I see the deadline is Dec. 10th. And you're right, dogs go first next year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone been out bowhunting lately? If not, shame on you! Its actually been a bit slow for me although I have some credible excuses - tons of them! Hoping the best is yet to come, like late this week into early next week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was like someone flipped a switch last weekend. I spent almost 45 hours in stand before last weekend, with a handful of deer sightings.

Last Sat. I got up to Webster about 11 AM, and had deer moving really well from about 4 PM on. I had a really tall fork and basket 6 in chip shot range, but no shooters.

I did have a wide, heavy 8 with short tines run alongside my truck for about 20 yards. This was right across the street from my buddy's cabin.

The bucks were in full chase mode last weekend. Hopefully we'll get a repeat performance with the cold moving in later this week. I head out tomorrow after work, for 4 solid days of hunting.

Is it tomorrow, yet?????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally after 20 some sits and passing up many deer under 8 points with out a doe sighting tonight was the night. 3 years of bowhunting with only one shoulder stab prior on a 10 pointer that wound up coming into my brother in laws stand a month later and up on his wall after that I had my chance. Dressed out 90 some pound sweet young doe/fawn! Near perfect shot, ran 100 yards and dropped (redemption). That will tie up the season for me to let all those small bucks grow for next year.

Best of luck to the rest of ya!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Well Molly doesn't have any snow on her.   You been drinkin?  
    • 70 pages dealing with Donald Trump and I can't find much that says anything on the positive side, of course in the past year and a half he hasn't said much that's been positive either.
    • @Neighbor_guy    Oh, I think the dismount was memorable too. 
    • I have fished for trout in my home waters for fifty-five years. The places I call home are the waters of the Wisconsin driftless area. Trout are my favorite species to chase. The trout of my waters have fluctuated over my more than a half century of fishing. Trout are instinctual creatures.  The big wily brown trout are my quarry.  They are portrayed as superior entities when in fact they have a brain the size of a pea. Do you want the keys to the castle?   I have seen many trends and fads come and go in the trout world.  This fancy rod and that special fly have cycled through a dozen times in my lifetime. Anglers come and go and so do the latest new fangled trends.  The constants in the trout world are the seasons and good old Mother Nature.  If you want a real leg up on those trout you should pay attention to the seasons and the changes they cause in the trout’s environment.     The weather in Wisconsin can be a harsh mistress.  The extremes are the norm here.  We could have twenty inches of snow on the ground and below zero temperatures and what seems like a blink of the eye in Wisconsin it changes.  The snow could melt and the next time you go fishing it could be radically different.  You need to roll with the seasonal changes and modify the way you fish and where you fish.

        This frigid morning in January was shaping up to be a “skunk” outing.  My friend was cold and told me he had enough and wanted to head back to the vehicle.  I talked him out of heading back.  We had taken the stream temperatures earlier and we hadn’t found a one reading over thirty-six degrees.

      The outdoor temperature was twenty-six degrees and not looking like it was going to warm up.  I had scouted this area prior and our fishing was going to get better I told him.
        Do you see the log laying on the right side of the stream?  Just on the other side of the log is a tiny trickle feeding in.  This trickle is a tiny spring.  Springs run year round here at about forty-two degrees constant.  Where that spring fed in caused a six degree temperature swing just downstream.  That little trickle made the stream bearable for the trout.    I have found many trickles during the early season when the grass is down that I cannot see even a month later due to weed growth.  It was like the Bahamas in that halo of the spring.  We caught seven trout in that tiny spot. Many feeders are not easily found during the summer.  They are covered up by weeds.  You can only discover them when the weeds are down in winter or early spring. I emphasize the word trickle here because they may be tiny and you will miss them if you are not looking for them.   My friend Andy and I fished this exact hole in September.  We both caught four trout each in this bend in September.  We couldn’t buy a bite in March.  What was different now?  First off the water temperatures were in the sixties in September and in the middle thirties in March. Trout lay in different areas during cold and warm conditions.     In Wisconsin winters the trout are in survival mode.  They need to find good lays where they don’t have to expend too much energy to hold in place and wait for food. The calories required to hold in place in this cold fast water is a negative formula for calories gained. This shallow fast current hole is great when the water temperatures are in the sixties and the trout can hide in the broken fast water.  In thirty degree water this holding place has no one home.  I would look for the deepest water either direction for two hundred yards.  This is where the trout would winter.
      One picture says a thousand words.  It was twenty degrees below out this day. The water temperature at this spring head tells the tale. It measured at forty degrees.  I like to call these Bahamas causing the water temperatures to fluctuate. A thermometer is a must to get a leg up on these instinctual creatures. This spring is a glaring thermal. 

       Many anglers discount some thermals because they are not so obvious.  A swamp is nothing more than a spring spreading out and they have the same properties as a small stream emptying into a larger waterway.  There does not need to be an obvious entry point to these swamps causing thermals.  They can leech through the surrounding banks and make their way into your stream.
        I am going to stay on thermals but switch seasons.  The temperature fluctuations you found to indicate where to find the wily trout in winter holds true in the dog days of summer.  I went with a Natural Resources crew to do a shocking.     The stretch we were to shock was a non-designated area way below typical trout water.  Even on a typical summer’s day in Wisconsin this waterway was almost too warm to fish in it.  Many anglers considered this “frog water” and dismissed it.  What a giant mistake they were making. 

       When water temperatures are near seventy degrees, it is recommended not to fish for trout.  It plain and simply puts too much stress on the fish and raises the mortality rates to an unacceptable risk for the trout.  Streams that are warmer have less dissolved oxygen in them.  Trout caught in water near seventy degrees have a hard time recovering from a battle due to the lack of oxygen.     I was in charge of the thermometer and Garmin on this trek into frog water with the fisheries folks.  Every thirty yards I was asked to take the temperature and write it down with the GPS coordinates. I was asked to submerge the thermometer at least halfway to the bottom to take the readings. I needed to hold the thermometer in place for ten seconds. I also was advised to make sure there was no secondary warming from my hands holding it.  The lead worker said the trout actually live in the lower half of water columns. The water temperatures hovered around seventy degrees at first.  We did not shock up trout in these areas.   We started to shock up some trout.  They were smaller fish.  I took the temperature and there was a slight change.  I looked around for a spring or a feeder creek.  There were none to be found. The fisheries staff told me to take more frequent measurements and log them. They were trying to prove a theory they had. I measured every ten yards on this stretch.  The temperatures continued to go down. The water temperatures were in the low sixties now and we were shocking numerous trout to the surface.  It was quite amazing how the numbers and sizes of the trout increased as the water got colder on this stretch.   We shocked up some true monsters from this waterway and then they just vanished.  The alpha or large predator trout had the lays in the coolest hides.  I could not see anything feeding in.  It was a true mystery to me.  There was a swamp about thirty yards from the stream.  It had no obvious entry points.  I followed my thermometer to its access point.  The swamp leeched into the stream and the only tell tale evidence was found with my thermometer.  

       The only visual evidence was softer banks that extended a couple of feet toward the swamps near the coldest points and these were my thermals.  I would not have discovered them without my thermometer. You can guess where the biggest brown were shock up correct?  Their noses were stuck right in the area where the trickles fed in.   I fish with many folks and they must grow weary of waiting for me to quit messing with my thermometer. Some stretches I fish regularly I leave my thermometer in my vest because of my historical data. My friend Dan Braun and I took a break during the midday of fishing due to water temperatures being too high and dangerous for the trout.  The outside temperature this day was eighty-eight degrees.  Dan took a temperature check at this spring head and it measured forty degrees. It is amazing to see a light bulb go on when another angler finally figures out why I am fiddling with my thermometer.
        The next time you fire up your computer check out the thermometers for sale.  There are many new and trendy versions.  There are many kinds.  I believe a keep it simple purchase is in order.  A bungee cord to hook them to your vest is a must purchase. A durable thermometer with easy to read numbers is what I carry. 

       I have been drawn to marginal frog water for over half a century now in Wisconsin’s driftless area.  My photos of big browns don’t lie.


       
    • Moose is staying home with no ice
    • Those "extended warranties" are mainly a cheap scam. The small print will ruin your day. And buying one AFTER  you have have the vehicle for a while compounds the mess.  Don't do it.
    • Til the end of my days, I will never understand why the northern states don't just stay open til January. What's it gonna hurt?
  • Our Sponsors