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Grabs

Dog Kennel Flooring

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Well I think I've come to a conclusion on what to use for a kennel floor.

I searched around and I'm planning on going with a 100% plastic decking material. Its at Menards and it comes in two pieces, the bottom section that gets secured and then a top section which is the floor and that snaps into the first section. Its called Royal decking or something like that. I looked at all different types of composite deck materials for this, but the problem I found is that most materials are paintable and stainable, which means that they will absorb urine too, unless you seal them every so often. This one won't absorb any moisture and actually has a textured surface to it so that not slippery in the winter months.

Does anyone have any experience using a material like this for a kennel floor? I plan to run 2x4' treated runners underneath (dog won't be able to get to these) and then the 100% plastic decking on top for a 4'x12' kennel run.

The cost of this material is $1.50 a foot, so I figure I'll have about $175-$200 in the complete floor, I don't think that's too bad for a decent kennel floor that will out last the dog and probably the next dog too, and be easy to clean from time to time.

Just want some input on this before I order material from Menards as this stuff is special order only.

Thanks!

[This message has been edited by Grabs (edited 03-31-2004).]

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One of our contractors who builds decks for us, still isn't sold on the so called maintenace free decking materials. He feels there is still a fair amount of failure with the material. I not 100% sure that the brand you're talking about falls into that category or not, I'd maybe do a little more checking, also maybe get a hold of the company and see if they feel it will withstand constant urine contact. If you don't want to pour a permanent slab, have you considered pavers? We use tham all the time, easy to clean, won't crack with the frost, looks nice, do it your self, Just another option... If you're going for the elevated, softer kennel floor, check out the rubber mats they make for this purpose. Foster-Smith sells them I know and I think Cabela's does also. I've had good luck with the plastic grates they sell at Fleet farm in my puppy pen. Gets them up off the "dirty" papers... this may be another option.

Good Luck! Labs

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Hi Grabs -

We picked up a lab pup last summer, and one of the first things I did was build an elevated kennel for her.

I made it with 4 x 6 landscape timbers for the six posts, and the frame and deck is regular construction grade 2 x 6 lumber (non-treated). So far it has worked great. I am thinking of framing a pitched roof over the top for some shade.

The urine and feces staining has not been a problem with the cold weather. Last fall, before freeze up, I just hit it with a hose, and it cleaned up and dried quickly.

I plan on putting some Thompsons sealer in a bug sprayer and treating it this summer, and then laying down some of that rubber matting.

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I used pavers over a sand/gravel base and then swept a bag of conrete over it to fill the cracks and sprayed with a hose. It sealed up nice with minimal cracking on the joints. I left about 1/4 inch between the pavers for the concrete. I have an insulated house in the inside of the garage with a 3 season house outside. It is a 3x6 foot elevated area with a roof and 1 1/2 sides so the dog can be outside under the roof but still be protected from the rain. If you'ld like to see it sometime Grabs let me know. I live about 15 minutes from where we met earlier.

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There are a few adds in this months issue of GunDog that sell kennel decking.
It is also full of puppy information this month.


I would be cautious of using treated timbers, be sure they are the new ones that are arsinic free.Don't want to hear that your new pup got sick or worst off the treated wood.
My pup chews on everything, including the ramp I use to push the motorcycle up into the shed on.She has a whole corner chewed off already.

I would also second the pavers, but do seal them as they are porus and will soak up the urine and water over time.

Benny

[This message has been edited by Benny (edited 03-31-2004).]

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Benny -

Yep, I agree on the treated lumber concerns. I have them isolated so the dog cannot get at them at all.

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Plastic will absorb the odor... I learned this the hard way with a shop-vac cleaning up after a keg party... The plastic reservoir stunk even after cleaning it with bleach of *used beer+* ... I dont see where urine smell would not set in over time.

Rubber Roofing might be a good option. We used it in a taxidermy shop on the work bench and it never took on the odor.

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I agree with the statement that plastic absorbs ordors. A number of times I've had dogs get skunked and I tried every type of ordor remover. None ever worked on the plastic collars. I actually spent more money on the ordor removers than what the collars cost.(not too smart, I know).

That is why I'm going to go with a metal dog trailer instead of the industrial plastic ones made in Edgerton,MN.

So I don't know if this translates to decking but it might be something to consider.

French Spaniel

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Here is the product:
visit: www dot royaloutdoor dot com/decks1.html

Its hard to tell from some of the pictures but the surface is "hatched" for traction under wet conditions. I have a call into the factory regarding the order to get some answers, no response yet.

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Intersting topic, I was wondering that it's obviously apprent that most of you guys have had dogs for years and have delt with most if not all waste situations. I have a 3 yr old yellow, my first dog since being a kid. I have a large 12x24 outside kennel that with access to a 4x6 inside the shop sleeping area, a tadd to big but it works. Right now the the out side area is unleval sod, floods during the spring so I have raised wooded decking that she can be on till the water drys up, I despertly want to inprove her conditions and will till up the 12x24 area and leval it off, then i thought I'd just add a good 8-10 inches of sand. I would'nt want to lay on cement or hard plastic or wood for my place of liesure. Doggie stuff would be easily scoopable and urine would evaporate, just rake the sand from time to time so it breaths. any thoughts on this, shes not a digger either. Thanks, boar

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