Jump to content
  • GUESTS

    If you want access to members only forums on HSO, you will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up .

    This box will disappear once you are signed in as a member. 😀

  • RECEIVE THE GIFTS MEMBERS SHARE WITH YOU HERE...THEN...CREATE SOMETHING TO ENCHANT OTHERS THAT YOU WANT TO SHARE

    You know what we all love...

    When you enchant people, you fill them with delight and yourself in return. Have Fun!!!

rustysetter

Towing a 21 foot + wheelhouse with a half ton

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone,  I am wondering if any of you are pulling a 21 foot tandem or bigger house with a half ton pickup and if you are what suspension enhancements you've done or would suggest. I know the towing capacities are adequate on a half ton but I had a half ton pulling a single axle 8x16 and that was about all it could handle safely. I do have a 3/4 ton but may want to consider a half ton in the future if possible because I don't need  a 3/4 ton daily driver. Thanks in advance for your feedback.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Almost everyone who has towed both has told me that the 20-24' tandem axle houses tow way easier than the 8x16 single axles.  My own experience is that I had a 8x12+3' v (single axle), and my 20' tandem tows substantially better.  There is way less bucking around from wind, and especially wind currents from other vehicles.  You can tell there is more weight, but it is really stable, and the new half tons have way more than enough power to get the load moving.  

I recently upgraded to a 3/4 ton diesel, but my half ton Eco Boost was plenty truck for my fish house.  I towed for a year or two stock, but I did eventually add air bags (Firestone Ride Rite) to the rear end, which made a really nice improvement in the ride.  I probably wouldn't have added them, except the truck sagged and bounced a little bit too much for my liking when I had a 4 wheeler in the back while towing my house.  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Almost everyone who has towed both has told me that the 20-24' tandem axle houses tow way easier than the 8x16 single axles.  My own experience is that I had a 8x12+3' v (single axle), and my 20' tandem tows substantially better.  There is way less bucking around from wind, and especially wind currents from other vehicles.  You can tell there is more weight, but it is really stable, and the new half tons have way more than enough power to get the load moving.  

I recently upgraded to a 3/4 ton diesel, but my half ton Eco Boost was plenty truck for my fish house.  I towed for a year or two stock, but I did eventually add air bags (Firestone Ride Rite) to the rear end, which made a really nice improvement in the ride.  I probably wouldn't have added them, except the truck sagged and bounced a little bit too much for my liking when I had a 4 wheeler in the back while towing my house.  

Thanks LRG, that's helpful.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't hesitate to do it, but you have to take extra weight into account. If you bring a wheeler, that's a lot of extra weight on the truck and add gear, food, beverages, etc and it adds up quickly. If it were me and I towed it regularly, I would get an add a leaf or air bags for the rear suspension. Takes the strain off and helps tow easier while accounting for the added weight. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tow an 8x20 tandem Ice Castle with my 2011 1/2 ton GMC Sierra. I added air bags to the rear suspension, which made a world of difference. I also use an anti sway bar that helps substantially in cross wind conditions. There are times I wish it had more power (I have the 5.3), but for the most part I am happy with how it tows and I can cruise in the 70mph range on the highway without any problems. Also keep in mind that tires play in big with towing. Most (if not all) 1/2 tons come stock with P rated tires for a softer ride and will flex more in the sidewall...LT rated tires will be much better as there will be less sidewall flex, which will keep the truck more planted when towing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tow an 8x20 tandem Ice Castle with my 2011 1/2 ton GMC Sierra. I added air bags to the rear suspension, which made a world of difference. I also use an anti sway bar that helps substantially in cross wind conditions. There are times I wish it had more power (I have the 5.3), but for the most part I am happy with how it tows and I can cruise in the 70mph range on the highway without any problems. Also keep in mind that tires play in big with towing. Most (if not all) 1/2 tons come stock with P rated tires for a softer ride and will flex more in the sidewall...LT rated tires will be much better as there will be less sidewall flex, which will keep the truck more planted when towing. 

thanks for the replies, good to hear from those of you actually towing one and the things you've added.

Thanks,

Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your swinging definitely get a the anti sway bar.  I put a 30+ foot trailer behind my half ton for a trip to the cabin and outside of MPG it tracked perfectly behind my truck.  It was only 1k lbs below my 8500 max cap. but even with good side winds it stayed plenty steady.  8 MPG however was a little painful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your swinging definitely get a the anti sway bar.  I put a 30+ foot trailer behind my half ton for a trip to the cabin and outside of MPG it tracked perfectly behind my truck.  It was only 1k lbs below my 8500 max cap. but even with good side winds it stayed plenty steady.  8 MPG however was a little painful.

Thanks for the input MLR.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

22 1/2 footer that weighs in at almost 7500 lbs. Can get a little squirrely in the right wind conditions but otherwise pulls as well as my previous 2500. I went with the Timbren SES. Thinking about the airbag system next time but the Timbren route is less than a third of the price and you can install yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a half ton F150  with the 5.0, and a 21ft Toy Hauler. I recently added SumoSprings and it helped a ton, helps with squatting and any sway.  The best part is at the end of day and I'm not pulling, it still rides like like a half ton.    Below is a link where I got mine at and they make it for quite a few different vehicles.

 

https://amzn.to/2K2Ps1y

 

#SumoSprings

#Towing

#Halftontowing

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A little late to this thread but I wanted to give my input.  I have a F150 with the 3.5 Ecoboost and grant it I don't have a big fish house(6.5 x 12) but I do tow a 28 ft enclosed snowmobile trailer with 4 sleds and all our gear in it and it pulls it just fine.  Tandum axles trailers pull way nicer then a single axle.  My next fish house will be a 20-21ft tandum axle setup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • I agree Dell, one set of batteries for 2 applications is a bad idea as I stated in my first post. Question was "will it work?" It will work, but its a bad idea.
    • The Gophers:    
    • It’s still a great season. Hopefully Fleck can build a sustainable program. 
    • It most certainly is amp-hours related, although the numbers vary somewhat by discharge rate.    The RC number on a battery is basically the amp hours at a specified discharge rate.   That curve above is for a particular battery.    If you multiply the times by the discharge rate, looks like it is for 10 or 11 amp hour battery like the one in a Vexilar.   Multiply those currents by 8 or 10 for a trolling motor battery, so like 4 hours at 20 amps instead of 2.4 amps.      Basically using one set of batteries for two different voltages strikes me as a bad idea.
    • Lead acid battery discharge is voltage related not amp/current. Amp hours are time based on about a 15% drop in voltage which is the same voltage where a DC motor stops turning. 12v battery flat volts is about 10.5v & 36v battery at 30v & motors stop turning. If you don't turn the motor switch off, discharge will continue down to 0 volts but battery will recover when re-charged. Not good for the battery to drop volts to 0v as it reduces the life of the battery. Lead acid discharge rate chart showing volt loss.
    • Just one of those games where we didn't get the bounces to go our way like earlier in the season. So.........win the next two games, get absolutely crushed by Ohio State and then head to the Rose Bowl. I can live with that.  
    • All you guys still don't get it.   I didn't explain it well enough.    There are three batteries, each can hold 80 Amp hours.      When the 24 volt motor is in use, two of the batteries use some of their capacity, equal for each battery.   So let's say you use 10 amps for two hours.   Now you have two batteries with 60 and one with 80.   Run all three (36 volt motor) for 6 hours at 10 and two batteries will be totally discharged and one will still have some charge.   Any further current draw will potentially damage the two batteries that are totally discharged.      Of course the 36 volt motor will probably quit working as soon as two of the batteries are flat, but the concern is there.
×
×
  • Create New...