Jump to content
  • GUESTS

    If you want access to members only forums on HSO, you will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up .

    This box will disappear once you are signed in as a member. ?

Cattle Panel Bale Blind


Slab_Supper

Recommended Posts

I guess I should have elaborated. The whole point would be to leave them out in permanent setup and not have to use wood. Last year I used the typical factory made hub style ground blinds and had issues with wind/snow destroying the blinds.

I have the cattle panel already available so it wouldn't cost me much.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We been using box blinds built with cut-down cattle (hog) panels for several years. We use camo or burlap material on the interior of the panels and weave brush into the exterior panel wire mesh. Five foot steel rods to hold up the panels. The material will weather and need to replaced every couple of years. Semi-portable but still very sturdy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've made four of them with a 2x4 frame and cattle guard over the top in a "covered wagon" manner. They work GREAT! Like was said above, these are not blinds you'll pop up here or there- they work best if kept in one spot. For mine, they take four of us to move very easily.

I used to use two pieces of cattle guard, but now I cut one in half and use 1 1/2 per blind. Here's how I do it:

1) I cut a 2x4 frame for the base that is 8' wide and the width of 1 1/2 pieces of cattle guard across the front.

2) I reinforce the corners of the frame with chunks of wood block, to help keep it sturdy.

3) I bend the cattle guard (both pieces) so it isn't perfectly rounded- I'll bend it in front and back so the front and back walls come more straight up, instead of rounding across the ceiling.

4) put cattle guard in place and secure with fence post staples. I get really long ones and bend them over across the front.

5) put landscaping plastic over the top of the cattle guard and wrap it around the frame and staple it in place.

6) screw down lathe over the plastic inside the blind to hold it better.

7) put another material over the plastic. I've used burlap, camo, or landscaping material. Use what you can get cheapest.

8) use lathe on the outside of the frame to hold it in place.

9) put in 1/4" plywood over the ends to make the endcaps.

10) put in a door. I've done this a few different ways, but so far I like the use of a cheap rubber rug hanging over the door (cut in the plywood), on the inside, best.

11) cut holes in cattle guard with a sawzall. You'll want 4 panels opened up, so it'll take four cuts. Having someone to hold the cattle guard helps a ton as it likes to bounce.

12) use some kind of heavy string (I use a heavy braided fishing line) with a huge sewing needle to sew up the edges of the window.

13) paint the entire inside black to help "suck up" light inside of it.

14) paint the outside if you so desire.

FYI- keep in mind that if you plan on bringing anyone else with you hunting (e.g., kids), you'll want two holes cut. Also keep in mind the angle you'll likely be shooting and where you want the hole cut. Putting it very close to either side wall causes problems. I typically put the shooting window just off center from the middle of the wall. Any closer to either side causes problems.

If you do a search for my name in the archery forum you'll likely find a bunch of pics of the blind. I thought I had some somewhere, but I can't find them. I'll snoop a little more...

FYI- these blinds, although not mobile, are about the best thing ever for kids. They're also extremely effective for anyone. Plus, they are wonderful for late season hunting as they really keep the cold wind off of you. IMO you'll never find a portable blind that'll hold a candle to these as far as comfort is concerned.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Found some! This is an example of one with two full pieces of cattle guard. This one is now used for the Twist of Fate hunt, so it works great given that it's really big and roomy.

A.jpg

B.jpg

C.jpg

3.jpg

2.jpg

1.jpg

There's been good number of critters taken out of this blind now. They really work well. I will warn you though, the price of them adds up pretty quickly. However, I'd much rather spend my money on the components to make this than on a portable blind that will go to heck in a few years with similar use (I know some last longer and work better than others, but my experience is that none of them are nearly as bomb proof as these home made ones). For a blind that will stay in one spot for a while, this is a great option IMO.

If you have any questions or need any other info, fire away! If I don't reply, PM me because I don't often snoop in this forum.

Note: I after I did this one I learned to bend the corners a bit to get the blind a little more square, rather than the rounded top of the cattle guard in this one. It works better that way and makes better use of the vertical space IME.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Scoot build this and I ended up using it for the Hunt I guide for, Twist of fate.

This blind has worked awesome. Lot's of room and my hunters have shot a deer every season in this blind. Also worked great to take my granddaughter in.

Rain stays out and I have not had even 1 deer to my memory scent us in that blind.

Thanks Scoot, you did a fantastic job on this blind. Hopefully one day, both you and Ryan can whack a deer in the blind.

Room for nice chairs or one could even put a recliner in it, that much room.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hopefully one day, both you and Ryan can whack a deer in the blind.

Thanks Tom- I'm glad it's worked well for the Twist of Fate hunt. That's such a cool program! I'm glad to chip in a little to it.

I looked at the ND regs a while ago and need to double check, but I think Ryan can legally hunt in ND this year as long as he can pull 35 lbs. I'm not 100% certain I'm ready to let him shoot at a deer yet, but I'm going to double check the regs and confirm and see where he's at with shooting. Our deal is 4/5 arrows in a group the size of a volleyball at 20 yards. If he can do that and I feel like he's old/developed enough to handle shooting a deer, we'll give it a go. I'm guessing I'll be in touch about this sometime in the next month or two.

Slab Supper, if you have questions or need info, let me know and I'll do my best to help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like the concept Scoot!! I have a spot where the trees are thin, the deer spot me every time, tried a partial ground blind, again they spotted me, this could be the ticket!!

Thanks for posting the pictures!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You bet BlackJack. If you're thinking about doing it for this year I'd suggest getting it done and out there ASAP. You can brush it in a bit, but if it's there for a while there's really no need. The one that Harvey mentioned sits in plain sight and the deer don't even notice it anymore. I think once it's there for a while it's simply accepted and pretty much ignored.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Scoot,

A few construction questions on the blind.

1) I know the panels come in 4 or 5 foot widths, which did you use? So then the front 2x6 would either be 8 foot or 10 foot.

2) Did you use the full 16 foot length?? Whats the best length for the side 2x6's in order to give you the correct head height?

3) What did you use to attach the cattle panels to the 2x6's with? Fencing staples?

4) What size did you make the shooting openings??

5) Was one layer of camo cloth enough or did you have to double it up??

I could probably wing it but the first one will probably come out better with some helpful hints!! smile

Thanks!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Blackjack,

My best effort an an answer to each one below.

1) I know the panels come in 4 or 5 foot widths, which did you use? So then the front 2x6 would either be 8 foot or 10 foot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Scoot,

I was looking at some cattle panels for a garden fence a few months back so that how I know they come in 4 and 5 foot widths.

A couple more questions smile

1) Your pictures make it almost look like a 8x8 square but if I follow your drift and use a 5 foot panel the floor would be 5x8, correct? With the shooting holes out the 5 foot side? Would you put one or two shooting holes out the 5 foot side? Do you ever put in more holes, especially on the side without the door.

2) So the two sides are actually 4x8 sheets of plywood? With one sheet modified for a door? With fabric covering the gap on top between the top of the plywood and the bent cattle panel?

3) Dumb question but I need to ask, how did you bend those panels?? They seem pretty sturdy to me, trying to bend 5 foot of panel all in the same 'line' would be interesting.

4) How high up do you position your shooting holes??

I saw a similar plan for a blind like this in Bowhunter a few years back using welded wire and camo cloth but this looks sturdier, and has a roof. I also have a roll of the black landscaping fabric.

Thanks!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1) Your pictures make it almost look like a 8x8 square but if I follow your drift and use a 5 foot panel the floor would be 5x8, correct? With the shooting holes out the 5 foot side? Would you put one or two shooting holes out the 5 foot side? Do you ever put in more holes, especially on the side without the door.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You bet BlackJack. If you're thinking about doing it for this year I'd suggest getting it done and out there ASAP. You can brush it in a bit, but if it's there for a while there's really no need. The one that Harvey mentioned sits in plain sight and the deer don't even notice it anymore. I think once it's there for a while it's simply accepted and pretty much ignored.

Blackjack, I have this blind in an open field and the deer walk within 10ft of it. With that said, it has been in the same location for I believe about 5 years now. Never been brushed in but I did set it in the field the fall before I used it for the first time. Lot's of room in there, I can get a handi-capped archer in there with his or her wheelchair and still have 2 lawn chairs for others to sit in. I have never had 1 issue with the deer looking in and getting spooked and it works out great. Nice to also have a hole in each side to peak out of so you know if a deer in walking in from the side.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Scoot!!! Now its time to build and try one!! Been thinking about several spots where I could use this type of blind. And as I get older climbing high in trees isn't as appealing!!! I could also see the appeal to a blind like this on a cold snowy day!!

One last question - how do you make the doorway? I 'assume' that you cut it into the side plywood, probably 18 different ways to do it, but maybe you could give me a tip.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A couple other thoughts that would help cut cost on this. First, if you can use one section of 5' panel, that'll be a lot cheaper than using 1 1/2 section of 6' panel. Also, use thin and inexpensive plywood for the ends. Not only will it be lighter, but it'll be cheaper. Also, if you can figure out a way to make exactly 1 1/2 pieces of plywood cover the ends, you'll save yourself the cost of one extra piece of plywood. I haven't figure out how to do this, but it'd obviously mean maxing out the height of the blind at 6' (one 4' piece of plywood and 1/2 of another to cover 6' vertically).

Another suggestion- build two of them! Once you have all the material together it's a great time to just build two of them. Given all the info you've got, the first one will go just fine. However, the second one will be better! Good luck!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The fabric roll I have is black.

I like the way you think 'make two right away'!!! smile Actually it makes sense, I'll need to hook up my trailer in order to get the 16 foot panel home, might as well bring home two!! And I know I can find spots for two!!

Thanks again!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You bet- good luck!

FYI- as ridiculous as I may have looked, I simply bent the two panels across the back of my pickup bed and put them in that way. I put one side in on the left, then bent it up and over and down to wedge the other end on the right, kind of like a covered wagon look to my truck! I held it down with a tarp strap on each side and it was fine. Looks dumb, but might save you the trip with the trailer. Oh, and two are a lot tougher to get bent into place than one!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now ↓↓↓ or ask your question and then register. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • First snapper yesterday. It was looking for Leech!     Was that Leech?
    • Baked taters  grilled pork chops and Califlower  . Had better Califlower though. 
    • Sunset last night on Burntside lake.    
    • Just don’t know where else to put this ray of hope.
    • We get eggs from locals who have chickens.  The difference in shelf life between washed and unwashed eggs was weird the first time I heard it.  Months for unwashed; maybe a month for washed.   Farm fresh is a fair amount different than from the grocery store.  Bigger yolks and thinner shells are two of the more noticeable differences.  I had my first red yolk eggs a few weeks ago.  Kinda freaked me out but it’s no big deal really.
    • Nature is pretty rad.    I think it's cool the eggs can just sit there for some time.  Especially because it can get quite cold.   There are sometimes a dud or two and I first thought it might be because they froze before mom incubated them but they always kick off.  When I have done post mortem examinations of the duds they always have almost completely developed ducklings inside.  I've never found one that was just some yolk.
    • No mosquitos yet, plenty of flies the last couple of days and here is my first spider outside of the house!    
    • I’ve never studied it but I’m pretty sure she has to be full time incubating before they all start.
    • I have a bunch of people telling me to install a camera in the box and set up a webcast.  I know my parents would love it.  Especially my dad, who built the house.     If I ever get around to it, I'll post a link.
    • I wish I would have caught them taking the leap and deciding which mom to follow.  I saw them that morning and it looked like about 2/3 went with one and 1/3 the other.  Definitely some gansers in the mix too.     I've caught the leap once out of 5 years.  I track it pretty close and can predict within about 5 days window of when I need to watch in the morning for mama duck to fly down and wait.  I had it nailed last year but real life prevented me from seeing it happen.   It's interesting to me that the duck lays an egg or two a day and they pile up over the course of a week/week and a half.  But they all hatch on the same day.  Crazy.  It must have something to do with development kicking off when mama duck starts sitting on them full time.  It's cool that those first layed eggs just sit there in a state of suspended animation waiting for mom to start full time sitting on them.
  • Topics

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.