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channelfats

Dealer Service Depts

14 posts in this topic

Can someone shed a little light on why getting a vehicle serviced at the dealer costs so much more than the average shop?

I have noticed a trend also that the average shop will work with you a little on the cost on alot of repairs, where as a dealer will never. Or atleast not for me.

Along with that I have noticed the shop I would typically take my car to if its a repair I might not tackle myself, will actually listen to what I have to say. I am dealing with a dealer service shop right now for the 3rd time at this certain shop, and all three times They wouldnt really listen to my description of the issue, and in one case he actually would speak over me and correct me when I tried to tell him the what I was hearing and expirencing. I understand there the professionals, hence me taking my car to them, but its frustrating.

I realize this may sound like a blanket judgment on all dealers, but I dont mean it to be.

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If you arent satisfied with this dealer bring it to a different one. You may just have talked to a service writer that isnt a very good writer. As for the increase in price, the dealer will have alot more overhead due to training, equipment, building, ect...

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They tend to have higher labor rates because a lot of times they are paying factory trained mechanics (not that they are any better than any other mechanic but they just specialize in one specific brand of vehicle). Also, dealers use OE parts which can be anywhere from 15%-50% more than something you would get at a regular auto parts store. Plus any shop will charge list price which is always a little extra too, (its where they make a little extra money to pay for shop equipment and other stuff).

As far as the experince your having with the service, I would go to a different dealer if a dealer is where you need to get the service done. Its simply a case of bad customer service. It happens at dealers and regular shops either way. You can always talk to the manager too. The service writer is there to be a translator between the customer and mechanic so the problem can be identified and fixed. If they aren't listening to you then they are not doing their job.

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Yep, your advisor is not doing his/her job, if what you say is true.

Typically, the advisor has the ability to adjust the price to a point, to sell the job. Anything more than this, he/she has to get authorization from the service manger. In these times, I can not see any shop letting a good paying repair walk out the door. If this person is talking over you, this person is not doing his/hers job correct.

I never understood why any advisor would get the “holier than thou” attitude, but they do. I would talk right to the service manager and if that fails, bring it to another shop.

The above has been stated about the labor rate at dealers and why it is set at that amount. All I can say is the dealer I worked at last had a rate of about $90.00 per hour. The local go-to independent shop was at $103.00 an hour for a labor rate.

What make and model of vehicle do you have? What is wrong or needs to be fixed?

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I was in the business for years. Most of the dealerships are more interested in salesman than service advisors. Most of the techs want to make as much off the job as they can also. It's not always in the best interest of the customer. In seven years at one dealership I saw 31 advisors come and go. Most of them knew very little about cars. Find someone at a dealer that has been there a long time. It's a tough job, if they can stick it out they have to be pretty good at it. Just my opinion.

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You can still call around to find out prices for repairs.

This happened quite a few years ago, but i had an older Dakota truck and the tranny went out. It wasn't in warranty anymore, but i figured i'd take it to the dealer to get it fixed. Shortly after i towed it to the dealer i called another "Shop" in town and they quoted me like $900 bucks or something. The dealer called back with the quote to fix after diagnosis and they wanted like $1200. I said i can get it done over here for $900 and he said they cant do it. I told him to pack the parts in a box and i'll have the truck towed to the other place. They agreed to fix for $900 and I was in business.

Keep in mind that this was probably '95 or so.

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If its a toyota dealer in the area I gaurantee I know which one it is and wich one it isn't!

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took my 00 GTP to the GM dealer to have a coil replaced-$125,same coil went out 2 weeks later so i took it back,they would replace the coil for free but said id have to pay for the labor!! ha i told em give me the coil and took it to a guy who use to work for dealer and he put it in for $50,also had a break line burst when it was so cold 3 weeks ago cost me $100 to get the brake line bent (underhood to rear tire on drivers side) and installed,if this woulda been at the dealer i guarantee it woulda been over $250,sure is nice to know a guy like this grin

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Well, it is a toyota dealer, but I would rather not say which one. I go here because it is the most convienient for my wife and I, due to our different work schedules, and our son inbetween at daycare. I just kept on giving this dealer a shot because I thought the odds of getting the same guy were slim, but theres more than one I find out. My original questions were more geared towards the reasoning of price, with the attitude issue second. I know better than to give business to someone whom I dont like. Its just convienence needs to prevail with our tight schedules and no extra vehicle.

Sticker shock may have had me a little heated when I posted the question too. crazy

Thanks guys, water on a ducks back.

Someday when I get a garage, Ill have to get a little AllData too. My garage is the street and the curb right now. blush

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I hear ya.Ihave been doing what I can in the driveway all winter. I try to save the big jobs for the summer and only do what I have to in the winter. What I would do for a nice garage with a hoist!!!

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Boy did I call that one!

Give Rob at Maplewood Toyota a call. I'm pretty sure he is still working evenings. He is the only guy I will deal with and have been nothing short of impressed and well taken care of (yes I get my vehicle serviced at the dealer grin). Being in the industry I know what flies and what doesn't and its easy for me to spot the what doesn't! I have no doubt that Rob will listen, identify, and get your concern corrected.

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Is it a DIS to dealers to pay(ALOT) to have some work done, and take their offical diagnosis of the rest of the problems and finish it yourself. I did because I couldnt foot the bill, and when I picked it up it was cold shoulder galore, and I didnt even get the printout of everything done read back to me or gone over to understand what they did do. I got dumped right away at the cashier to pay the bill. I said some word under my breath to him and that were ugly enough to make the cashier uncomfortable.

On top of that, their diagnosis was wrong, and now since I wanted to finish it myself, they wont stand behind their diagnosis because they didnt do it themselves. I kind of even get that part, but why the attitude?

So, I guess they only like to fix for alot of money, as opposed to help a guy, for still alot of money, with minimal labor on their end. I guess im just angry at myself for going back there, where [PoorWordUsage] is SOP. And no, Im not "that guy", a know it all or blabbermouth, to anyone.

Note to self: Rob at Maplewood.

Offically Vented,

thanks Guys

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Is it a DIS to dealers to pay(ALOT) to have some work done, and take their offical diagnosis of the rest of the problems and finish it yourself.

I did this once when I didn't have the equipment to properly/confidently diagnose the problem. I don't feel bad about it, nor, IMO, should the dealer be upset because I paid in full for the work and diagnostics time.

What I wasn't going to do was pay $1200 for a new set of the same crappy Multec injectors that were the problem. I bought a set of eight new Bosch injectors for a Ford Mustang SVO for $249 that fit right into my Chevy (thank you Internet). The car has never run better. And, the red tops of the injectors even match my red car...bonus!! wink

(PS: Yes, same flow rate within 1#, and same resistance of the coils.)

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Channel, what problem are you having?

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