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Pickelfarmer

New Brit

13 posts in this topic

Ok I've posted a little on this forum about dog training and I've added my 2 cents on a couple topics. Now for my question. I got's me a new little brit pup. Seems smart and has LOTS of energy(12 weeks old). Any tips on training him for upland hunting.Not so much with stay,sit, whoa,or come but training in the feild. I've heard that I should get him nuttered at 16 weeks. I really doubt I'll ever use him for breeding if only because he doesnt have papers. He is full brit (both parents have papers)but the owner didn't get him registard. Any thaughts????

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The basics are always going to be the cornerstone of training fine bird dogs there is no way around it.

These dogs naturally want to hunt the birds and get in the field. But reigning in the dogs talents in the field.

There are many exercises in the the field that can be done. The best is just time in the field when the dog is under control.

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First, if you're going to get him fixed, do it sooner rather than later.

When training a pointing dog the first step is teaching "whoa". I do this in the back yard on top of the dog's pet porter. You could use anything else that gets them up off the ground. Hold the dog still and give the "whoa" command, then gradually back away still giving the command. I use a 2 toot whistle (with my mouth) to release the dog. This teaches the dog a command (whistle) that it's OK to leave the point to relocate. I use this often when hunting, as it seems that our local pheasant population runs more than they used to. Over the course of several training sessions you will be able to whoa the dog up and walk all around it without the dog moving until you whistle to release them. I can't emphasize enough how well they need to know these 2 things..."whoa" and a release command. You could use a wing on fishing line to reinforce steadiness as well. Your dog will likely sight point it right away, but don't overdo this...it can be harmful in the long run as a dog can learn to rely on sight to point rather than scent.

The next step is live birds. Pigeons are easiest if you have access to them. I was lucky when training my latest shorthair this summer as I had a limitless supply of pigeons in a grain bin nearby. Plant the pigeon in medium height grass and work the dog into the wind toward it. The minute you see he smells the bird he should have the instinct to slow and stop...this is when you give the "whoa" command. You can then approach him and staunch him up, etc. Works good if you have 2 people, as one can release the bird while you steady up the pup. About 2 of these training sets per session is enough for a pup. These training sessions are important and provide the framework for how you can expect to see your dog begin to sort out the puzzle of upland hunting.

Good luck. Have a brother-in-law with a young male brit and he's a really great bird dog...fun to watch.

NWBuck

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Congrats on the Brit. Mine is clsing in on 2 years old and I couldn't be happier with him.(Most of the time). One thing I will recomend is keep him occupied, and exercised. Mine could be a little demon with some free time. I also had mine neutered at 4 months and didn't effect him at all. Start slow and short with the training, keep it fun, enjoy your time with the dog.

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Thanks to all for the replys. So it looks to me like this is going to be about the same drill as my labs. Just a few different twists here and there. I have been already working on the sit stay whoa and come. I will make an appointment for the vet to get him fixed when he is around 16 weeks. NWBuck you stated sooner the better, Do you think thats soon enough? He's about 11 weeks now.

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I think 16 weeks is fine. I've seen it done at about 7 months and it gets considerably more traumatic for the dog.

NWBuck

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When I had mine fixed, I asked the vet how soon I could do it and he stated, 4 months (16 weeks). He didn't recomend any earlier than that.

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I'm sure there are vet recommendations across the board but my vet recommended waiting at least a year, until the bone structure was finished growing. Testosterone plays a part in that. I don't recall the details, but after talking to my vet and then doing my own research, I've decided that I won't neuter my dog at all unless there's a compelling reason.

I'd suggest researching the issue from both points of view and then decide what's right for you.

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hey pickelfarmer where did you get your pup from? I am looking for a brittany and was wondering where to get one around central MN.

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I am planning to get one from Bens Brittanys. He will have a litter ready in March. My girl is definately ready to have her duties lessened with the new pup.

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You can't go wrong with one of Ben's pups. I got one from him last fall. She's a handfull but fun. She just got done ticking off my wife because she chewed up one of my sons brand new gloves!

What dogs is the litter from that you are getting? Mine is from Ike and Babe. She stayed a little on the small side but she is a smart dog.

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not quite sure, going down there this w/e to check out his operation. He will be having 2 litters coming up soon

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hey pickelfarmer where did you get your pup from? I am looking for a brittany and was wondering where to get one around central MN.

I'm sorry I didn't get back sooner I havn't checked this post for a while. I got mine from a friend of mine. He doesn't have any left. I guess he sold the last one last week. Just to give an update I have been working with "BOB" (I know it seems like a funky name but the boys 3 and 5 named him so who can argue?) and it seems to be going good. he sits stays and fetches OK. I'm havin some fun with him but I need to work more with him AFTER MUZZLELOADER hunting laugh thanks to all for the great replys.

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