Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
MNpurple

Slowing the dog down?

16 posts in this topic

I've got a lab that isnt quite 2 years old yet. 95% of the time she works very close to me and comes back to check in from time to time, I love her this way, but lately she has been picking up scents from quite some distance away and I just can't keep up with her!

For example yesterday about 4 times we were working some cover when it was obvious she "turned on" to a scent. She started working the trail back and forth at a fast pace and each and every time she ended up flushing the pheasant 75-100 yards from where she first picked up the scent. I'm assuming she is picking up the trail of a running bird although maybe not. Two other times I hollered at her to "woah" and she waited until I got up next to her and then I sent her after the scent again but by then the bird was gone. We were always working into the wind.

So how do I get her to work a scent slower, so I can keep up with her? I have an e-cloar that I don't even use anymore but I sure dont want to zap her for following a trail. Or do I just need to start wearing running shoes? Maybe work with the wind at our backs?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey mnpurple, you might just need a pair of running shoes. Your dog in my eyes is doing the right thing. A good flusher should make scent and then drive hard to the bird to make the bird flush. Unfortunately pheas doesn't like that game so he runs dragging pup right along behind. You are right not to shock the dog esp. one that young. Like you said if you slow them up you risk losing the bird when he doubles back . You need to keep the preasure on that bird and keep the dog right on his tail. That means you right on dogs tail, that sometimes means double time for you. Some guys do hold thier dogs back and it is probably a must if you are hunting in large groups. But if you are alone you will deffinately see more birds if you just let your dog stay on them... That's why hunting behind a pointer can be so enjoyable sometimes. They point and wait for you...that is of coarse if the bird holds...I say run em and gun em! at least until your dog has a little more experience.. I don't know if that helps but I'm sure you will get a lot of different opinions on how to handle this one ...Good luck, and have a great season ..uplander

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My lab is 8 this year and on a running bird especially in thinner cover it is tough to tame him down. The drive is to find the bird, and the hotter the scent the hotter he gets. I have tried nicking him to slow him down, didn't work.

Several years ago we were working a fence line along a CRP field, Duey got on a bird and it took him out into the CRP I could see the grass parting as he worked his way through it and hear his tail wack, wack, wacking faster and faster the closer he got. The next thing I see is the Rooster come shooting out to the edge and making a bee line right down the field road. OUt comes Duey nose to the ground until he sees it and then its off to the races. He ran right though the hottest setting I have. Hundred yards later, Rooster gets to the gravel road, flushes, Duey stops looks for me and doesn't hear a shot, sees me still walking down the field road and romps back to me with that "did you see him" look and starts hunting again.

I have a friend whose lab starts to creep when a bird starts to run them, fun to watch, but many times the bird never slows down and it flushes wild anyway. I have heard you can use a check cord to hold them back and train them to slow down, but I have never tried it. Once in a while you get lucky and the bird flushes back towards you but not often.

I would advise, ( from personal experience) not to run. A badger hole and a hyper extended knee taught me that lesson. Still feel it once in a while after a long day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with grab the net. I try to avoid running at all costs and let the dog work. Badger dens wreak havoc on knees.

You're doing the right thing by working into the wind. Obviously if a bird is running while you're pushing into the wind, the bird has been pressured before and it's going to be tough to get them any closer.

I was on a public land last week with my Lab and GSP. My lab stays within 30 yards at all times. She got very birdy by a small water hole and almost like clock-work, my GSP went wide into the wind and circled back only to kick the bird out 40 yards away. She never had a chance to catch the birds scent for as windy as it's been.

I would start with a check cord and some farm birds (pigeons or pheasants). If it doesn't work out, I would slowly introduce the collar on the lowest setting. I had to do this with my GSP as she would tend to range out too far and I couldn't call her back. As soon as the collar is on, I rarely have to use it now that she knows what it is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey purple. I think our dogs are siblings, you got yours from bushwacker? My dog does the same thing. He gets on a scent, he has a great nose, almost too good, but hes like a dog on a mission once he picks up the scent. Not much you can do. I do have a e-collar on him, when he gets kind of hardheaded and doesnt listen I give him a nick, it seems to work. Hes starting to understand what I want, I think it takes a little more experience on the dogs end. Mine progressed a lot this season from when he was a pup last year, so its kind of a learning exp. for both of us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fishroger, yep same litter, sounds like they are very much the same. Her biggest improvement this year over last is her ability to follow a track/trail. Sometimes she gets running back and forth so much I think she is just playing, but it usually never fails, a bird eventually flushes. Just need to learn to trust that she's way better at finding them than me:)

Thanks for the input guys. I think the more experience she gets the better she will be. Maybe this is a good reason for me to get in a little better shape! And your too late, the first outting of the year I experienced the badger hole moving a little too fast, that knee still hurts, I'm lucking I'm still hunting this year!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got a lab that isnt quite 2 years old yet. 95% of the time she works very close to me and comes back to check in from time to time, I love her this way, but lately she has been picking up scents from quite some distance away and I just can't keep up with her!

For example yesterday about 4 times we were working some cover when it was obvious she "turned on" to a scent. She started working the trail back and forth at a fast pace and each and every time she ended up flushing the pheasant 75-100 yards from where she first picked up the scent. I'm assuming she is picking up the trail of a running bird although maybe not. Two other times I hollered at her to "woah" and she waited until I got up next to her and then I sent her after the scent again but by then the bird was gone. We were always working into the wind.

So how do I get her to work a scent slower, so I can keep up with her? I have an e-cloar that I don't even use anymore but I sure dont want to zap her for following a trail. Or do I just need to start wearing running shoes? Maybe work with the wind at our backs?

Why are you know longer using your collar?

No matter how old the dog, no matter how well he is trained or no matter how good you think the dog listens or responds to you, once the dog is collar conditioned the collar NEVER, EVER comes off.

The only exception to this rule, the dogs last hunt.

I think you just have to scoot a little bit to get in range. On a runner like that where it be a pheasant or grouse it is pretty tough to get a dog off the scent that you have taught him to find.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Labs in my expereince are "here and now", dogs. If the sent is strong they run for it, if its week they work for it.They are for the most part waterfowl dogs that love water and hunt there best for ducks. My best buddy was a lab that I used for both grouse and ducks. Grouse though not the same as phesants act alot alike. They run or they flush.Though grouse never seem to run as far as phesants. To hold my dog back, I use a check cord in the feild while training. It only took a few times for the dog to learn that even if he wanted to get ahead of me he couldn't. I think you need to drive home the comand "Woah". It is the same with upland dogs. they learn woah as an important part of holding a flush. you dont need a E collar to do this. just a nice long piece of check cord and a few trips to the feild with sented dummys hiddin in the grass up wind from your dog. he/she will get the hint as soon as he/she rushes for the sent but can only go so far and then hears the woah comand no matter how strong of a feeling they have to rush forward.Because of the woah comand and the check cord. Over excitement is called birdy behavier and its a good trait. It just needs a little tweeking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree w/ Pickelfarmer... Although I'd rather not be "that guy" out there w/ my lab dragging his checkcord around the field, it helps a LOT w/ teaching him to slow down (most importantly, without hindering his drive to hunt and find birds). Tucker's in his 1st full year of pheasant hunting and now, about 1/2 way through the season, the "light is coming on" to the short "whoa whistle". (Not to mention that a $6 check cord is a heck of a lot cheaper than a good e-collar!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the check cord and choke chain, when you dog gets to the end of the cord give a little tug. I like to use the command "come around" A few times doing that and you dog will get the point. I use beeper collars and and can use that. If I cammand "come around" and she don't I beep her. She knows if she don't listen to the beep she gets a nick. I usually have to nick her once maybe twice all season and she remebers what the beeper is all about. i know the cord is a pain when you are hunting but so is a dog that breaks 50 yards out when you are hunting with a group of people. best is to work your dog with the cord by yourself. Really work her with it and she will come around for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting post since I have two labs, one 13 years old and one 4 years old. Neither one wears an ecollar. I'm more of the 'pick up the pace' when they get on a hot trail. When they're on a hot scent, I can call them back and put them on heel, then send them off again once we get to the point where they came back, but after doing that two or three times, with all the racket, that bird is gone, you'll never get him. Better to watch your dogs get hot, and pick up the pace. 90% of the time they'll flush that bird within 50 yards. I can hotfoot it for that distance.

People keep talking about 'hunting into the wind'. To me thats overrated, what do you do when you hit the far end of the field? You hunt with the wind to your back. When I hunt a field I'm more concerned about where the food and cover for the birds are. And if you want to slow down your hard charging lab, hunt with the wind to your back.

Guys have mentioned badger holes - been there done that, my brother and I have a jihad going against badgers in SoDak. And don't forget grown over gopher mounds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People keep talking about 'hunting into the wind'. To me thats overrated, what do you do when you hit the far end of the field? You hunt with the wind to your back. When I hunt a field I'm more concerned about where the food and cover for the birds are. And if you want to slow down your hard charging lab, hunt with the wind to your back.

I'm not talking about HUNTING into the wind. Just training. Its alot easier to TRAIN into the wind than against it. Hunting is a whole other story, its game on and where the wind blows nobody knows. I like the fact that you dont use an E callor. I think alot of guys give in to easy and buy one to make there training easier. Not me. I know that some dogs might need one as a last resort and for that I can see but as a last resort only not as a starter tool. You give, In my opinion some great advise on hunting labs. Hope your season went and is going well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Obviously this is one more post describing improper use of an e collar, an e collar used correctly for training not punishment is the most effective dog training tool on the market set correctly it should do less harm/stress to the dog than tugging on his leash would do to his neck. Not to hijack your post but too many people get frustrated and think lighting up a dog everytime he does something undesirable is the proper use of an e collar. I have seen many people jerk on a training lead or leash with more force than any e collar could ever deliver (or is that many jerk$ pull on a training collar?).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been running into some of the same issues the last 2 weekends with my Brittany. He has been working too far ahead and becoming more and more stubborn when it comes to commands like whoa and heel. He didn't wear the E collar 2 weeks ago, and this weekend he did wear it, but it was completely dead. As dusk was approaching and we were driving to out last spot, we could see dozens of pheants coming out of the corn stubble and into the grasses on the edge of the WMA. Before we could get into range, my dog would not leave the trail of a bird in the cattails. After the yelling and pushing cattails I was trying to avoid, I could see the birds busting out in front of us. He just doesn't seem to want to listen when he is on a bird. It seems lately that I am hunting for him, instead of him hunting for me. I don't want to shock him or call him off running birds, but even a former track star like me can only take so much high stepping through the cattails. Any ideas on how to slow a pointing dog down?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Obviously this is one more post describing improper use of an e collar, an e collar used correctly for training not punishment is the most effective dog training tool on the market set correctly it should do less harm/stress to the dog than tugging on his leash would do to his neck. Not to hijack your post but too many people get frustrated and think lighting up a dog everytime he does something undesirable is the proper use of an e collar. I have seen many people jerk on a training lead or leash with more force than any e collar could ever deliver (or is that many jerk$ pull on a training collar?).

I agree 110% with you thellcon. I I'm not saying that E collars are bad. I have never used one but I know that todays EC's are much more dog friendly than the ones that were made back in the early 90's. They left a sour taste in my mouth because of there settings. Pretty much HOT and well Hot. the ones today have alot better control and it seems they are a good tool to use with a dog that will not respond to other meathods. I also agree with the leash statement you made. I've also seen guys tug and pull on a leash and it makes my neck hurt watching it. I like the check cord cuz thats what I used training my labs and it worked but there are alot of other ways thats for sure. Sounds like your right on track and know how to use your training tools. Hope you have/had a good season.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buy a 35' piece of 1/2" braided nylon rope and put a good brass swivel/clasp on the end to clip to the dog. Do not put any knots in the rope. Let the dog pull the rope everywhere while hunting - it'll slow him down and will wear him down. All you need to do is step on the rope to slow him down or stop him. Repetition is the key here - solid basic obedience skills in the dog and repetition will teach him to wait for the gun.

Patience is your ticket to ride in this situation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Most of them will be liberals..   Ha ha ha...     Fake news ?   The direct result of a video...   I landed in sniper fire...   The stupidity of the American voter...     Hilborg...   Created, marketed and sold thru fake news to gullible libs across the country.    
    • And you still think something is not screwed up in this country!? I fear a great many people are headed for some very painful disappointments in the next couple years.
    • A 56 percent majority of Trump voters say that if a national media outlet reported that Trump said something untrue, they would be more inclined to believe him than the news outlet.
           
    • Here is some more business fueled by Trump and Uncle Bill type LIVs.   Fake News: How a Partying Macedonian Teen Earns Thousands Publishing Lies by ALEXANDER SMITH and VLADIMIR BANIC   VELES, Macedonia — Dimitri points to a picture on his Instagram showing a bar table decked with expensive champagne and sparklers.  It's from his 18th birthday just four months ago — a lavish party in his east European hometown that he says wouldn't have been possible without President-elect Donald Trump.  Dimitri — who asked NBC News not to use his real name — is one of dozens of teenagers in the Macedonian town of Veles who got rich during the U.S. presidential election producing fake news for millions on social media. The articles, sensationalist and often baseless, were posted to Facebook, drawing in armies of readers and earning fake-news writers money from penny-per-click advertising.  Dimitri says he's earned at least $60,000 in the past six months — far outstripping his parents' income and transforming his prospects in a town where the average annual wage is $4,800. He is one of the more successful fake news pushers in the area.  His main source of cash? Supporters of America's president-elect.  "Nothing can beat Trump's supporters when it comes to social media engagement," he says. "So that's why we stick with Trump."  Even with the presidential contest over and Google and Facebook's plans to crack down on fake news makers, money continues to pour in.  Posts about Hillary Clinton are also a hit — but only negative ones.  "I have mostly written about her emails, what is contained in her emails, the Benghazi tragedy, maybe her illness that she had," Dimitri adds, but now he's moved on to headlines like: "Trey Gowdy Revealed His EPIC Plan To Imprison Hillary Now That Election's Over, SHE IS DONE!"  Dimitri's sole aim is to make his stories go viral.  His most popular headlines during the election included: "JUST IN: Obama Illegally Transferred DOJ Money To Clinton Campaign!" and "BREAKING: Obama Confirms Refusal To Leave White House, He Will Stay In Power!"  The teenager is unrepentant about any influence his stories may have had on swaying public opinion.  "I didn't force anyone to give me money," he says. "People sell cigarettes, they sell alcohol. That's not illegal, why is my business illegal? If you sell cigarettes, cigarettes kill people. I didn't kill anyone." The same weekend that NBC spent with Dimitri, a gunman opened fire in a Washington, D.C., pizzeria. The shooter told police he was motivated by a fake news story. The pizzeria, Comet Ping Pong, was accused online of hosting a pedophile ring run by Democratic leaders. Asked about the incident this week, Dimitri claimed he wasn't familiar with the story nor the people who had spread it online.   A Modern Gold Rush The small, rust-belt town of Veles has found itself in the international spotlight after investigations by BuzzFeed and the Guardian traced more than 100 fake news domain names here.  The fake news bonanza couldn't have come against a more jarring backdrop. Once part of communist Yugoslavia, the Republic of Macedonia has a population of 2.1 million in a landlocked area about the size Vermont. Blanketed by rugged mountains, parts of the country have enjoyed a tourism surge in recent years. But vacationers won't find Veles in many travel guides. The town of 50,000 is almost an hour's drive down a lonely, crumbling highway from the capital, Skopje. Macedonia is landlocked by Bulgaria, Serbia, Kosovo, Albania and Greece. Google Maps Visitors are greeted by a distressed mosaic of red-roofed buildings, densely stacked onto a steep mountainside. Industrial smokestacks add to a wintry fog settling over the valley — though even their output has diminished after several recent factory closures.  Almost a quarter of Macedonians are currently unemployed — a rate around five times higher than in the U.S. But the burdens that weigh on Veles might also explain why it's become a global hotbed for fake news. High unemployment and a close-knit community meant that when Dimitri and others started making money, word quickly spread and everyone wanted a piece of the action.  Most teens here speak fluent English, allowing them to quickly navigate through reams of Western news sites and pinpoint potentially viral content.  Dimitri estimates there are now 300 locals dabbling in fake news, with at least 50 making "decent money," and around a dozen making "a lot." He says he's not quite at the top of the pecking order, but not far off.   But he is no scrappy teenager. Dimitri is bright, with an obvious aptitude for business.  He won't show NBC News his profile on Google AdSense, an online advertising service that allows websites to make money, to protect five other teenagers who asked him not to reveal aspects of their shared interests. He's also wary of revealing his full income, worried it will make him a target for thieves, or worse. However, he does show NBC News a digital receipt from Google showing he earned more than $8,000 from the web giant in September. He says this was just one of several advertising accounts, and claims his most successful streak — in the run-up to the election — saw him rake in $27,000 in just one month.  When asked for comment about the persistence of fake news even after the election, Facebook directed NBC News to a post from CEO Mark Zuckerberg last month in which he laid out the company's plan to tackle the phenomenon.  In an interview with TODAY on Thursday, Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg acknowledged "there's a lot more to do."  Google outlined steps last month that it said would restrict advertising on websites that "misrepresent, misstate, or conceal information." The company did not respond to NBC News' requests for comment on this apparently still-flourishing industry. Dimitri says even after the election, while business is less brisk, his fake news is still highly profitable. Like any business, he's aware of the need to adapt. "This business updates every hour, every ten minutes, every minute," he says. "There are always news ideas, new types of generating new visitors and that's the thing we all want." So while newspapers across the globe are losing advertising revenue, Dimitri's empire of lies is thriving. He says he now employs three 15-year-olds, paying them the equivalent of $10 per day. As well as buying new laptops and paying cash to boost his posts on social media, he has also invested some of his earnings into real estate — a joint venture with his parents, who are more than happy with his success.   The Anatomy of a Lie As with many regular journalists, Dimitri starts his day by trawling the web looking for trending topics that he can harness to drive traffic to his websites. He copies his posts from other fake news websites, including many in the U.S., or takes content from mainstream media organizations before peppering them with invented details. He also posts provocative online polls such as: "Should Trump Deport All Refugees?" and: "Do you consider Donald Trump, the Jesus of America?" Most of this content is published on websites Dimitri has built to look like NBC News, Fox News, the Huffington Post and others. A fake news page run from Macedonia that is made to look like Huffington Post. To the untrained eye, fake headlines such as: "BREAKING: Obama Confirms Refusal To Leave White House, He Will Stay In Power!" look genuine. The only giveaway is the imitation URL.  From then on, it's a case of throwing as much mud at the wall and seeing what sticks. "The most-read news articles are usually the ones containing the click-bait words," Dimitri says. "The click bait words, as you know, are, 'Oh my god, breaking news, wow,' and usually something that has never been aired before. Because if the title just says, 'Today this happened, today that happened,' no one will open that." He and his collaborators post these stories to their Facebook pages dozens of times a day. Again, he would only show NBC News a Facebook page that he runs on his own, which has an impressive 86,000 likes. But he said the six pages run by his collective have amassed more than 3 million likes between them. "Say you produce ten lies a day, [the audience] is not going to believe ten lies, they are going to believe probably one or maximum two," he says. "Usually the lies about [Clinton's] emails and the lies about Hillary. The anti-Hillary posts were really good." Stories from USA Daily News 24, a fake news site registered in Veles, Macedonia. An Associated Press analysis using web intelligence service Domain Tools shows that USA Daily News 24 is one of roughly 200 U.S.-oriented sites registered in Veles, which has emerged as the unlikely hub for the distribution of disinformation on Facebook. Both stories shown here are bogus.  Dimitri says he has set up more than 50 domain names in six months, all in a bid to please Facebook's algorithm and get the maximum number of eyeballs on his posts. He claims in that time his posts have achieved some 40 million page views. "We stay up late and we don't sleep that much — I haven't slept good for a couple of months now," he says. "I have to go to school and then at night I have to work." He and his colleagues see the process as an art. At first they worked on a basis of trial-and-error. Now it comes naturally. "You see what people like and you just give it to them," he explains. "You see they like water, you give water, they like wine, you give wine. It's really simple." The challenge of engaging readers on social media is one familiar to most journalists. They have a formidable opponent in Dimitri and his peers; analysis by BuzzFeed after the election showed that fake news websites actually performed better than conventional press and television.  Dimitri is unequivocal about why the mainstream couldn't compete: "They're not allowed to lie."   Partying to the Tune of Fake News The influx of money has created a thriving party culture in Veles.  On Saturday, one local nightclub was barely keeping up with demand, as dozens of teens and young adults ordered ice buckets filled with large $35 bottles of vodka. In this new era, the purveyors of fake news are the coolest kids in the schoolyard.  "Since fake news started, girls are more interested in geeks than macho guys," says one 17-year-old girl standing at the bar.  The most successful fake-news publishers have "bought themselves houses, apartments, maybe invested in some real estate or in some businesses," according to Dimitri. "They have bought themselves cars, they have bought ... their girlfriends better cars, better places to live," he says. Keen to feed off this gold rush, the nightclub even plans to organize a club night on the same day that Google pays out its advertising money.  A nightclub in the Macedonian town of Veles where teenagers dabbling in fake news go to party. Following Google and Facebook's vow to clamp down on fake news, Dimitri says he knows people have lost tens of thousands after their accounts were shuttered. "When they started to shut down webpages, business went down," says 20-year-old Kiko, a bartender at the nightclub. The impact appears to have been short lived, however, judging by the healthy flow of local currency, the Macedonian denar, being shoved into the club's cash registers. Most people are cagey about admitting any direct involvement in fake news. But Tony, a 40-year-old taxi driver, says that every young person he knows — including his own son — is in on the act. "I've been doing this job for 18 years and I know everyone in the city," he says. "I know kids who are minors, 16 or 17 years old, and they bought BMWs after running these websites." Is he worried about his son making money from selling hoaxes online? "It's better to do this job than to go into the drug business," he says. Also unperturbed is Veles' mayor, Slavcho Chadiev. "Is it criminal activity? Not according to the law of Macedonia," he says during an interview in his office. "All that money went through the state system and everyone paid their taxes." He isn't bothered by accusations that Veles' teens swayed the U.S. election. In fact, he welcomes the idea. "Not as a mayor, but as a man and as a citizen, I'm glad if Veles contributed to the Republicans' victory and Trump's victory," he says.   A view of Veles in November.  Like many Macedonians, he blames recent Democratic administrations in Washington for not doing more to help their country's attempts to join the European Union and NATO. (Greece has blocked these efforts in a dispute over Macedonia's name — the country's official title at the United Nations is the cumbersome Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.) On the flip side, the mayor still remembers fondly when Republican President George W. Bush recognized his country's new title in 2004. What would he do if he encountered one of these fake news tycoons? "I would ask him, 'Are you looking for a job?' Because I have a lack of IT guys," he says, before admitting that the salary of less than $400 might not be attractive. Dimitri says his goal is to earn $1 million, and it's no surprise the young entrepreneur sees Trump as "a small role model." There's only one question that sees doubt creep into Dimitri's cocksure demeanor. When he copies posts from other fake news websites, does he worry he's being used as a pawn to spread propaganda? "When you buy a certain product, you don't know who created it," he says. "You don't know who creates your shoes, and there are rumors that small children in Africa create them." He adds: "Maybe I don't want to find out, because if I find out maybe I'm going to feel bad. Right now I'm feeling OK.
    • I WAS AGAINST IT!!!! If it wasn't for Jay Cutler, Mauer's, would by far be the worst contract in sports history!
    • striker for me...I have had the suit for 3 years now and absolutely love it.  I wear the inner jacket everyday and when I go ice fishing I never worry about being cold as the suit is as warm as can be and I know that if I were to have an unfortunate incident and fell in I will be floating on top! 
    • Goldman Sachs has been smiling all the way to the bank lately...   As noted by market legend Art Cashin, the director of floor operations at UBS and long-time trading veteran, Goldman Sachs, one of the 30 stocks making up the Dow Jones Industrial Average index, has been responsible for a huge amount of the increase in that index. From Cashin’s daily commentary on Wednesday (emphasis added): “The Dow closed up 35 points and almost 23 of those points came from Goldman Sachs (GS). In fact, our good friend and fellow trading veteran, Jim Brown, at Option Investor, points out that GS has rallied $57 since the election. That means that GS has provided 441 of the 1363 points that the Dow has rallied. In case your calculator batteries are dead, that’s about one third of the rally, all due to Goldman.“    
    • The bigfoot blocks the light just fine. I bought used so there were portions of it that were worn and had tiny holes, but even with that I could see great. Making sure your skirt is down properly and covering up the floor make a much bigger difference. I use EVA foam exercise tiles for the floor, light weight and shed the water well.

      This year I went around and patched up a bunch of those, I used something we had lying around called Gesso, but I am guessing white out would have worked fine. Let that dry and then went over it with a sharpie. I doubt it will make a difference in me getting a fish or not, but needed to fill some time with the late ice  .   I am fairly certain this is the style of interior that caused the issue of seeing lines in the hole.
  • Our Sponsors