Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
DonBo

Public Invited: DNR Elk Mgmt. Meeting

9 posts in this topic

Minnesota’s elk management plan will be the focus of two upcoming

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) public meetings.

The plan will address population levels, crop depredation and hunting

season management of wild elk in northwestern Minnesota.

Meetings are scheduled for 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 16, at the

Greenbush-Middle River School gymnasium, 401 Park Ave. in Greenbush, and

7 p.m. on Tuesday, May 5, at DNR headquarters, 500 Lafayette Road, St.

Paul.

Elk are native to Minnesota but likely were nearly extinct from the

state in the early 20th century.

In 1935, the transport of rocky mountain elk, combined with natural

immigration from Manitoba

and possibly North Dakota, have resulted in small elk populations in

Kittson and Marshall counties.

DNR wildlife staff will present parts of the draft plan, facilitate

discussion of issues and answer questions. Comments received will help

complete the draft plan, which will be available for formal comment

before it is finalized.

Copies of the draft plan and comment forms are available online. Copies

also are available at:

DNR headquarters in St. Paul

DNR regional wildlife office, 2115 Birchmont Beach Road N., Bemidji,

218-308-2700

Thief Lake WMA, 42280 240th Ave NE, Middle River, 218-222-3747

Karlstad Area Wildlife Office, 202 Main St. N, Karlstad, 218-436-2427.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a question I have been thinking about for awhile. With the thousands of acres of state and federal land in Northern MN why can't they look into tranplanting the herds to these lands? Or keep the herds small in the current areas and start new heards on the government land? Hunters pay alot of money to hunt Elk out west. And with the number of deer hunters in the state you would think there would be alot of interest in increasing the elk hunting opportunities, not to mention the increased revenue for the businesses in those areas and the DNR instead of having them in an area where they are considered a nuisance.

I'm sure there is no simple answer, but would like to know if there has ever been any thought about it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PostFrontal, I like your thinking. If the elk are a problem, solve it don't just change it. People pay a lot of money to hunt elk and I'm sure if Minnesota had a larger herd there could be quite a bit of money to be made. If the elk are a problem for farmers they should move the elk and expand the herd to allow for more hunting opportunities. Of course this might not be possible, but I like this idea more than removing the herds entirely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Folks, The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is involved and is lobbying to get the elk plan changed. They have granted a lot of money to habitat inporvement over the years in NW Minnesota.

If you would like to see the elk flourish, attend these meetings and make your feelings known. In addition consider joining the RMEF and attending a banquet.

Here is my testament to what kind of experiences can be had with Minnesota elk.

http://www.fishingminnesota.com/forum/ub...Min#Post1518925

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They've tried to relocate the Grygla Elk herd East into Beltrami state forest. The elk always move back to the farmer's fields north of Grygla. The thousands of acres of state land in northern minnesota isn't very good elk habitat. If you were an elk, would you pick tromping around in the swamp foraging for food over grazing in a sunflower field?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crappie Killer is correct - elk will go where they want to go. In addition, once cows have a bond with a particular area for calving, they tend to hang there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never hunted Elk, but it has always been something I have wanted to do. I've considered joining the RMEF but since I haven't hunted for them, I didn't really think I would have alot to contribute. So I'm new to the issues with it but read everything I can that I run across about it. So forgive me if my questions seem naive.

Ck-you live in the area, what is feeling of the community up there about the Elk heard? Is it something they want to find a way to make work to improve the hunting and viewing opportunities like Gissert is talking about? I'd assume there could be potentially a large influx of dollars to the area if it was done right. Or is the depradation too out of control that they just want the herd kept small?

If RMEF and the DNR changed the focus of their grant money to habitat management in the State Forests so they could support a new elk herd there would that be possible? And then keep the NW herd small if that is what the community wants?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, it's dangerous to speak for other people, since I'm not a politician, but since I've lived here most of my life, I'll tell you what I think.

Some farmers in the elk range have adapted to the elk herd, and put some of their land in CRP or just hayland. But the ones that still plant crops...I think would like to see them disappear somehow. When 40 elk move through a soybean crop, they're more like cattle, not deer. They really can mess things up.

As far as the hunter/tourism thing...sure, come up here and spend a boatload of money! I think the motel's rate is like 35 bucks a night, and sometimes he'll make you breakfast in the morning!

Now, the elk spend a lot of their time on private land, so you'd have to get hooked up with a local. I think most of the property owners in the area would allow you to hunt on their land for elk hunting.

Oh, and the elk reside in the TB zone, just a few miles south of where most of the infected deer have been shot.

This post sounds negative, but I actually like having the elk here, and often take the family out for a drive to see if we can find them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me being an outsider - I'll agree with what CK stated.

When I had my bull tag in 2005, they were hanging 2-3 miles east of where they typically rut. This was unusual, I was told. The key that year was beans. The cows were holed up in some public land (where the DNR would really like them to stay. This area was outside of the hunt boundary. Last September when we went camping, they were where they have traditionally been.

The cows (in 2005) would come out at night and feed in the beans. There were 30-40 acres in one corner that did not have much left. They holed back up well before light, and you just cant call bulls from over a mile away when they have that many cows.

I know there used to be reimbursment for depredation, I dont know how close it came to making things square with the farmers, or if the program exists anymore.

I now personally play the tourism game. We plan on going sometime every year to look at and watch elk. We eat in town, buy fuel, etc. I have really become attached to the area, and will also do grouse hunting trips, and maybe some late season muzzleloading. We dont spend a ton of money, but it is money that is a direct relation to the elk and my great experience. Grygla is a wonderful town.

As far as getting permission, not one landowner denied me. I think permission is a lot in how you ask. I made phone calls well in advance, and came up prior to the hunt to meet and thank them face to face. After the hunt was over, they all got thank you cards, wether I hunted their land or not. If someone shows up a day or two before season and trys to gain permission, then there might be some denials.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • The wife and I went on Sunday also. Like Rundrave, a lot of the lodge booths didn't really appeal to me but we talked to quite a few dog people there, maybe learned a few things. Funny how two people that would have nothing in common can talk like old friends for 20 minutes about a dog.Realized that a lot of the game farms are WAY more expensive than the one I'm a member at.  Over all I would say it was worth it.
    •     I think we would be better served by not being suspicious of religions themselves, but by being suspicious of rulers and oppressors who use religion as a tool to serve their purposes.     How Gandhi put it:   I had practiced Hinduism from early childhood. My nurse had taught me to invoke Rama when I feared evil spirits. Later on, I had come in contact with Christians, Muslims and others, and after making a fair study of other religions, had stuck to Hinduism. I am as firm in my faith today as in my early childhood. I believe god would make me an instrument of saving the religion that I love, cherish and practice. In any case, one has to have constant practice and acquaintance with the fundamentals of religion before being qualified for becoming god's instrument. It has been whispered that by being so much with Musalman friends I make myself unfit to know the Hindu mind. The Hindu mind is myself. Surely I do not need to live amidst Hindus to know the Hindu mind when every fiber of my being is Hindu. My Hinduism must be a very poor thing if it cannot flourish under influences of the most adverse. I know instinctively what is necessary for Hinduism. As my instinct is wholly Hindu, I know that what I am about to say will be acceptable to the vast mass of the Hindus. My Hinduism is not sectarian. It includes all that I know to be best in Islam,Christianity, Buddhism and Zoroastrianism. I approach politics, as everything else, in a religious spirit. Truth is my religion and ahimsa is the only way of its realization. I have rejected once and for all the doctrine of the sword. My position is and has been clear. I am proud of being a Hindu, but I have never gone to anybody as a Hindu to secure Hindu-Muslim unity. My Hinduism demands no pacts. I am no politician in the accepted sense. It is because I am sanatani (orthodox) Hindu that I claim to be a Christian, a Buddhist and a Muslim. Some Muslim friends also feel that I have no right to read Arabic verses from the Koran, but such (people) do not know that true religion transcends language and scripture. I do not see any reason why I should not read the Kalma, why I should not praise Allah and why I should not acclaim Muhammad as his prophet. I believe in all the great prophets and saints of every religion. I shall continue to ask god to give me strength not to be angry with my accusers, but to be prepared even to die at their hands without wishing them ill. I claim that Hinduism is all-inclusive and I am sure that if I live up to my convictions, I shall have served not only Hinduism but Islam also. There is mention of terrible punishments in the Bhagavatam, the Manu Smriti and the Vedas. Yet the central teaching of the Hindu religion is that mercy of kindness is the essence of all religion. I want you to bear in mind what Tulsidas has said: "Good and bad, all men are the creation of god. The man of god picks up the good and discards the bad like the proverbial swan which is able to drink the milk and leave behind water, when a mixture of water and milk is placed before it." I am proud to belong to that Hinduism which is all inclusive and which stands for tolerance. Aryan scholars swore by what they called the Vedic religion and Hindustan is otherwise known as 'Aryavarta.' I have no such aspiration. The Hindustan of my conception is all-sufficing for me. It certainly includes the Vedas, but it includes also much more. I can detect no inconsistency in declaring that I can, without in any way whatsoever impairing the dignity of Hinduism, pay equal homage to the best of Islam, Christianity, Zoroastrianism and Judaism. Such Hinduism will live as long as the sun shines. Tulsidas has summed it up in one doha (couplet): "The root of religion is embedded in mercy, whereas egotism is rooted in love of the body." Tulsi says that mercy should never be abandoned, even though the body perishes. Hinduism is not an exclusive religion. In it there is room for the worship of all prophets in the world. It is not a missionary religion in the ordinary sense of the term. It has no doubt absorbed many tribes in its fold, but this absorption has been an evolutionary, imperceptible character. Hinduism tells everyone to worship god according to his own faith or dharma and so it lives at peace with all religions. Though I call myself a sanatani Hindu, I am proud of the fact that the late Imam Saheb of South Africa accompanied me to India on his return and died in the Sabarmati ashram. His daughter and son-in-law are still at Sabarmati. Am I to throw them overboard? My Hinduism teaches me to respect all religions. In this lies the secret of Rama Raj. The die is cast for me. The common factor of all religions is non-violence. Some inculcate more of it than others; all agree that you can never have too much of it. We must be sure, however, that it is non-violence and not a cloak for cowardice. Hinduism with its message of ahimsa is to me the most glorious religion in the world -- as my wife to me is the most beautiful woman in the world -- but others may feel the same about their own religion. Religion is outraged when an outrage is perpetrated in its name. Almost all the riots in the unhappy land take place in the name of religion, though they might have a political motive behind them. There is no room for goondaismin any religion worth the name, be it Islam, Hinduism or any other. If religion dies, then India dies. Today, the Hindus and the Muslims are clinging to the husk of religion. They have gone mad. But I hope that all this is froth, that all this scum has come to the surface, as happens when the waters of two rivers meet. Everything appears muddy on top and underneath is crystal clear and calm. The scum goes to the sea of itself, and the rivers mingle and flow clear and pure.          
    •   thanks all for the replies - how does this Aqua Vu HD 700i display show up outside?  So from the replies I'm sure I narrowed my search down for either the Marcum VS825SD or Aqua Vu HD 700i.  Not just have to see if I can find some year end ice specials.
    • Add some Liptons Beefy Onion soup mix to your burger. Adds a great taste.
    •     Must be Milwaukee or Ryobi because DeWalt already has 6amh batteries and they do make car chargers as well.
    • "They" As in Milwaukee?
    • During the past century we were also concerned with Germany, Japan, Korea and Vietnam. You blaming them too?
    • The MN DNR Eagle Cam pair already has three eggs and is over half way done incubating them. http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/features/webcams/eaglecam/index.html
    • Google;   Sayyid Qutb  and you can then read and decide on your own where and how todays Islamic Fundamentalists originated. 
    • Also check out discount ramps dot com
  • Our Sponsors