Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
waterbound

The Biggest One I've Ever Seen

16 posts in this topic

Earlier today I was out in eastern Washington County fishing a small stream and I had a little luck. I caught two browns and a third trout that was either a brook or possibly a tiger...I'll put pics up later. After walking upstream quite some distance I came across a waterfall that had a fair sized pool under it. I was only fishing for small trout with my ultralight rod but I thought I might as well toss a spinner in the pool to see if anything would eat. A couple trout about 8-12 inches showed when I started my retrieve and then I saw a trout come shooting out from under the waterfall that was well over 30 inches (I think...it didn't stick around long). I threw a few more spinners and tried crawlers but nothing wanted to come back out of that hole. I'm pretty sure that the big trout is still there because the water downstream of the pool was fairly shallow and I think the water above the falls was pretty shallow. The stream is very clear and there are not a lot of holes for the trout to hide from predators in, but I'm convinced that there are more big fish to be found. If anybody wants to go down there sometime to try catching a great big...brown or rainbow or who knows just let me know, I'd love to see one of these beauties landed before the season's over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not entirely sure if this is a brook or a trout...can anyone give me a positive id?

100_0724.jpg

100_0721.jpg

The final hole with the big one

100_0730.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool pics of what is definitely a brook trout. Probably should keep quiet about locations like these, though!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking it was possibly a tiger because I haven't seen such a silver/olive colored brook trout before. Thanks for the help in figuring out what it was. And don't worry, the only people that are going to know where this was are the people that might be able to help me catch a great big fish laugh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yours is an odd colored brookie

tigerab.jpg

Native Tiger Trout

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if possibly the brookie was colored like that because of the clear water, it is possible to see the bottom even in some of the deeper holes. Len, what would you suggest using to try to catch the large trout? I'm assuming that most of the forage was smaller trout, as I had seen them in the same pool and I don't think the water was deep enough for the big one to move downstream. It took me about an hour walking briskly to get back to my car from here so I don't really want to bring a lot of tackle if that would be possible...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like a tiger to me, especially the net photo. Len is the only person I know that catches a number of tigers and if he says it is a tiger, then it probably is. Congratulations! It is a rare catch. I have yet to catch one and I've been trout fishing for 15 years.

Sure it was not a sucker? I've caught a number of 20"+ suckers this summer too. I'd fish that hole with a crawler and spinner one hour before/after sunrise/sunset. That would be 5:30-7:30 am and 6:50-8:50 pm. I'd come from the side versus wading up the center. With a plunge pool like that could be deeper than you think. You have until Sept 30 to catch that fish. Have at it!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure it wasn't a sucker, it seemed like it was drawn out of hiding by the trout following my spinner...seems like an awfully predatory move for a sucker. I want to try fishing it before sunrise but that would mean waking up by 3 in the morning, driving an hour across the cities and walking a little over a mile in the stream to the pool, which means crawling under bridges, barbed wire and a supposedly "haunted" road...so I'm thinking Thursday is gonna be the day I give it a try. wink

I'm going to try some spinners and worms...if that won't work I think I'll try X-Raps and maybe a Rat'L'Trap

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From my experience, trophy trout rarely bite during the day. It is one hour before/after sunrise/sunset rule. Keep in mind sunrise is late now - 6:30. You don't need a flashlight by 5:30. I'd be at that hole by 5:15 to set up shop.

Assume weeds are so overgrown and there is no clear trail that follows the river? Maybe identify landowners using GIS map for Washington County and ask permission? Assuming there is a trail you could get there faster than wading.

I'd start with a tiny split (just enough weight to get it there) and a fat stout crawler. Try that first. If he does not hit then try the raps and the spinners once there is enough light out for the fish to see. If you are going to make a day of it I bet a hopper tossed close to the bank might get is attention. If you are not fly fishing try some live hoppers. Two on a hook are irresistible, or so I am told.

Good luck to you and please report back!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Len here. What you've got is a light colored brookie and not a tiger. I used to live in Colorado and would catch the light colored brookies in the late summer up in the high mountain lakes. Females have a tendency to have this color (or lack of) more than the males. Note the reddish spots surrounded by the blue-ish purple halos. That's a brookie.

As for hooking a trophy, like Scudly said, fish them either in the dark or near sun up/down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm fairly sure all of the property surrounding the stream is private and there are lots of signs warning against trespassing so I doubt any landowners would let someone walk on their property. I might have to catch some grasshoppers and try them then. I was also considering dead bait or maybe a crayfish...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So the land is posted. Did you jot down the info? Just because land is posted doesn't mean the landowner will not let you on. Call ahead, do not show up at his door 7am. Explain your intensions. Ask if the owner has any rules. Offer to pick up trash

If you park at a bridge and legally enter water and keep your feet wet on posted land there is a better chance the landowner will call the sherrif on you

and try to get you ticketed for trespassing. Most landowners are reasonable and appreciate a call versus the "stick it to the man, I know my rights" attitude. However thi time of year keep in mind some are getting ready for hunting and do not want visitors spooking the deer so you might get turned down. My advice is always call. I don't fish posted land period unless I have permission

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Waterbound - if you’re looking for a trout fishing partner, I'd be happy to meet up with you some time. I live in eastern Washington County (Stillwater to be exact) and I get out trout fishing quite a bit. Well, I guess this year I haven’t really been out as much because I’ve been having good luck on the St Croix, but I would love to get out the trout gear again and get out before the season is done. I usually have to go solo since I can never convince my friends to wake up at 5 AM so it's always good to make new fishing buddies! Send me a personal message if you’re interested.

Johndstringer at gmail.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey waterbound, im pretty sure i know what stream this is but would you be opened to confirming this by email? My address is mikehislop714 at msn dot com, if you dont want to i totally understand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it is a brookie for sure,I fish these beauties 4 to 5 times a week ,I find the light colored brookies are found in deeper pools or in lakes appossed to rivers with fast water they tend to be darker.

river run brookie

P9150653.jpg

DSC00579.jpglake brookie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok so im new to this forum and going through some of the old posts. i find it strange that you think that the silverish colored brookie is not common. maybe its just the streams i fish in winona co. of s.e.mn. but the majority of the brookies i catch (except in the later part of the season) are all the silvery color.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    •   No expert here either but I've talked to a couple.    Would your new, expanded slab be conducive to making the addition another zone or zones?  You could maybe run that expansion off different lines from the manifold above the slab so you don't have to route and pour over seams.   Definitely insulate below with GOOD insulation.  As mentioned, heat doesn't really rise the way we think it does; it moves to the cold and the earth will soak it up.   Heating your loop would be cheapest with a natural gas fired boiler, propane second.  Geothermal is expensive to put in so your payback on a new system is long.  Air source heat pumps are great until it gets really cold.  In the end, radiant in floor is the most efficient way to heat, but yes, it's slow to respond.  But if your toes are warm, you will be too.
    • I appreciate the response, I take nothing personally and didn't mean to be snippy in my reply. There are a lot of great comments on here and I will keep you posted on what I decide. Thanks again. 
    • Ice is quickly thinning on those northern lakes that still have ice with dangerous conditions on most lakes. The Wisconsin River is now open even in its northern stretches, but ice chucks can be seen melting along the river's edge. The lower Wisconsin River has finally dropped to near normal levels. Some walleye and brown trout are being caught on the Menominee River both trolling and angling from shore. Low water and cool water temperatures slowed the walleye run so far on the Oconto River. Anglers along the Wolf River have been starting to catch walleyes. A few sturgeon have been seen along the Wolf River, but warmer temperatures are needed for the sturgeon to start their annual spring spawning run. Walleye and sauger action on the Wisconsin River and Lake Wisconsin is slowly picking up.The steelhead season opened on the lower stretch of the Brule River last weekend and anglers reported good successPhoto Credit: DNRSpring steelhead fishing opened last Saturday for the lower stretch of the Brule River and there were lots of fishermen and fisherwomen on the river many who had a successful opener. .
    • I apologize if that came out wrong. The idea might very well be the best route to go. It's just that over the past 25 years or so I have seen many attempts to save a dollar that cost a buck and a half to do lol.    Here are my two cents. If you have a slab and you want to pour on top of it while keeping the same footprint that sounds pretty doable and could probably save some money if you don't have to change drain lines, run water, heat runs, electrical etc into the slab.   If you intend to tie into the existing slab and run zones of pex across the joint and have the new and old floors end up at the same elevation it still can be done. Some contractors will not want to mess with tying into and raising the elevation of the slabs and will prefer to start from scratch especially if you as the homeowner want them to warranty the finished product.  The critical thing would be to use enough rebar drilled into the old slab and have enough compaction and sufficient footings to make sure the slabs stay where they are without settling. That would make all kinds of problems with the pex.    Hopefully that response came across better.
    • It'll be interesting to see if the team plays a little harder in front of a different goalie. 
    • Hawg, I'm with you on this one !
    • Check and see if you have a video output on you device. You may be able to record to a digital device.
    • Just use plain old spray paint in a can. I've done it many many times and seems to stick really nice. Nothing special either I can't even tell you the brand because I have no clue. But as mentioned doing 2-3 light coats helps.
    • no expert here, but heat doesn't rise. heat radiates in the direction of least resistance (R value). warm air or water rises because it is less dense than colder air or water.  If you don't insulate you will be heating the ground under your cabin and the earth is a very large heat sink $$$. get some info from an expert in the radiant field as far as tube diameter, spacing, water temp, manifolds, length of runs, and so on. it varies on amount of windows (solar) ceiling height and room type (bed, bath, living area,  storage etc.). once you pour over the tubing you get to live with it. I did my own Home 15 years ago and got some good advise (wish I would have taken it all)
    • Sonar works from above, cameras need to be submerged. What am I missing here?
  • Our Sponsors