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Scoot

Anyone bivy hunt?

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Do any of you fellas bivy hunt? Bivy hunting is where you carry your entire camp on your back and pack into an area that is otherwise really tough to get into to (i.e., trucks, 4-wheelers, etc. can't get there). Most people consider bivy hunting different from hunting out of a spike camp because in a spike camp you come back to the same location each night. In bivy hunting you hunt where ever you want to, then make camp wherever nightfall finds you.

Just curious to hear if anyone here has done any of it. I plan to make my first bivy outting this coming Sep. Lots of specialized gear, tons of planning, and a good bit of getting in shape-- in very excited about it!

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Think I got too old for that a long time ago. I envy you for going for it though. Should be an adventure.

Elk and mulies???

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So, are we going to be calling you Cameron Scoot, or Scoot Hanes? smile

I'm actually planning on a modified bivy hunt on my Colorado bow hunt next year. Hauling my camp on my back, and hunting until I get where I think I want to be.

Not the same I know, but that's all I've got in me for now.

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There are not many people that do it for two reasons,

1. They are not mentally or physically willing or able to do it

2. Its not at all effective for getting meat out along with all of the gear that you bring in. Even as guides for wilderness area elk and deer hunts, we use mules simply because there is no way to get it all on your back plus everything else.

I will say however, just as riding horse back into the backcountry where vehicles are not allow and cannot travel, this type of hunting really makes ya feel free. You can go as far as your legs will take you. I think feeling free is the main reason we go into the backcountry. Good luck on your adventure! and be sure to take all of the safety precautions.

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Scoot, I have bivy hunted and it takes a little more work but you have the chance to drop and camp where you are seeing the best sign. That is the upside. I backpacked my bow, clothes, food and shelter in but found it more advantages to drop the tent in a promising area, scout and glass the area the night before, get up predawn and set out for where I saw animals and hunt the area and the morning hours. I would come back to the tent in the late morning and decide if it was another pack and hike or if the area warranted more hunting time and effort. Supplies I used were a featherlight stove, a water filtration pump, freeze dried food. The water filter is much lighter and easier now with the UV pen which saves weight and room. It is definately a great way to hunt and get away from it all. Make sure someone knows where you are going and when you plan to return. Try and give them a day by day reference plan as to where you plan to hunt prior to leaving in case you need to be rescued. Obtain good topo maps of the area you plan to hunt and make sure you have all the needed survival equipment to spend time in the woods in case something unfortunate happens. Know how to use your compass and don't rely solely on GPS or technology to get you out of a bind. Good luck with your hunt. Planning and preparing is a big part of the fun!

Tunrevir~

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I have also done this, it takes a great deal of prep and effort, both mental and physical. My first time was a DIY elk hunt by(bow) in SW montana in mid september. We made many mistakes, brought to many clothes, and unneeded gear. Our first night it snowed 8inches and was -10 when we woke up. But we woke up to 5 bull moose all hot and heavy over one hot cow right behind our camp. Right when we woke up we swore it would be our last night in the bush, until we saw that!! We would have still been at the trail head trying to talk ourselfs out of the warm truck! Even though we where hunting elk and didn't have a moose tag, that changed our thoughts. Long story of it that year was our first trip out west, we'd never done it, didn't have the money to do it but we looked into it, and did it, and we came home with one dang fine spike BULL, not to bad for a couple of "flat landers" ya the air is thin up there. The next year we brought a little bit bigger tents than last year, yes those one man bivy type tents are light but they sure condense a lot of moisture on those cold nights, plus they feel like a coffin. We also invested in some light weight clothes, good base layers, then wool, followed by down, covered with packable rain gear, with one change of outer layers. Not to mention water tabs, and a good compact cook stove, and dehidrated meals, gps, maps, a few misc bow repair items, knifes, sharpeners, pack frame, calls, fire starter, and a mental note that I ONLY GET TO DO THIS ONCE A YEAR GIVE IT MY ALL! oh and a good buddy (with horses)that knows what day I plan to be back so he can come find me if for some reason I am late. By the way our second year we got one nice 6x6, and one missed shot. I would be like you planning this years hunt, but the draw was not on my side, we now have a preferance of one! PS check out the pack frame in eastmans BHJ the one with the wheel on the back of it, it could come in handy.

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DonBo, this year will be a short mulie trip. I'll do elk trips in the future like this though.

Flatlander, yep- sounds like more of a spike camp situation. Regardless, it sounds like a lot of fun!

Kyle, I think I'm ready for your #1 criterion! I'm in pretty good shape and I'll enjoy the time in the woods. I've done enough camping and spent tons and tons of time in the woods and on the mountain. It's past time for me to do this and I believe I'm ready. We'll see...

Regarding #2 and getting the elk out- I'd love to have access to mules and horses, but that's not in the cards for me. I agree, it's not an efficient way to pack out an elk (on your back), but I totally disagree with your statement, "because there is no way to get it all on your back plus everything else". Our group has packed out seven elk in the last two years on our backs. Granted, this has been done with expandable day packs in the first trip (Black Creeks Canadian), then frame packs on the second trip, but that was totally doable. The bivy pack that I currently have (Sitka Bivy 45) will allow for the same thing to happen-- my hunting partner and I will each haul out a medium-smallish load with ALL of our gear in the first trip (this is totally doable-- I've added up all the weight and it'll only be about 10 more lbs than the first trips in the last two years). Then, we'll make a second trip with frame packs, just like the last seven elk we've delt with.

Will it be easy? Heck no! It's back-breaking, difficult work-- and I've LOVED doing it!!! I hope I do it again many, many times!!! For this coming Fall, I'll be mulie hunting- I can take care of a mulie in two trips by myself with no problem. I haul out rack and meat only (field dress the critter with the gutless method and carry game bags) and a deer with be no problem for me (well... I'll sweat a lot and work hard at it, but I'll definitely do it just fine). Heck, I hauled out an entire yearling doe last year in my Canadian in one trip. Two trips, one with a frame pack, will be totally doable for me or my hunting partner.

All that being said, if you want to come with as a packer and bring your mules, you're more than welcome! wink

tunrevir, thanks for the heads up. We'll take all the necessary steps to be careful. We'll have barebones first aid kits, we'll give people a heads up as to our plans and when we'll be back, I ALWAYS carry two compasses with me in the field (and I know how to use them), etc. Excellent advice, thanks!

bhuntr, I elk hunted in SW Montana many moons ago- I was in the Alder area. What area where you in? Just curious.

Thanks for the thoughts and advice- I appreciate it. I'll post pics of my gear at some point and get feedback on it. I've done TONS and TONS of research on each and every piece of equipment that I'll be bringing and most of the items I have coming along are ones I've used in the past quite a bit.

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Think I got too old for that a long time ago.

You sure you're too old? This fella hauled out his son's elk for him last Fall... He's in his mid-70's.

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Scoot, the best thing you have going for you is the thirst for the adventure, the foresight to plan and work towards it and the lust of knowing that it IS going to be hard work packing out the animal you shoot but loving every second of the work you put in both before and after. Have a super hunt and good luck:)

Tunrevir~

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tunrevir, I can absolutely tell you "get it" by the way you worded your reply! I can't wait...

bhuntr, it sounds like fun! I want to go back to Alder, because my dad and uncle have some wonderful connections there. However, in the area we hunted it's virtually impossible to get to places where a vehicle can't access it. It's beautiful country, but that's a show-stopper criterion for me...

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