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SomethingFishy*

Snowmobile Clubs

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I have never been in a snowmobile club as we just bought our sleds this year. I was curious on peoples thoughts on some things. I have contemplated joining a local club for the support side of things but am not big on attending meetings, in my ATV club that I am a member of I only seem to go to every 2nd or 3rd meeting, It seems like there are too many politics involved that take the "fun " out of it. I pay my club dues annually but feel I only really do so because I enjoy the once a month club trail ride.

I am just curious on peoples thought, am I in for the wrong reasons or does the support really help to make it "ok" for my lack of participation?

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It makes a difference! If you think of it as writing your congress person and speaking out on a subject. For every person who does they count 50 more that think the way you do. Most people get into the clubs for the same reason you have just stated, only to find out the politics, myself included. If you don’t like the meetings then don’t go, but if the club needs help for a few hours cleaning up trail in the fall try to lend a hand. It is very hard to keep these trails going today, so many people think they just appear and that they have a right to use the trail. We all are privileged to use the land owner’s property that we travel on. Most of the snowmobile trails are on privet property which the owner has signed a permit for the club to maintain a trail through. As we all know it only takes a few to destroy a lot. I have found that the politics that has to be gone through is a pain, but lucky for all of us, there are dedicated people that use a lot of their time to keep things going for the masses.

By the way I am in a snowmobile club and do the paper work for the funds we receive, they have changed the hole procedure for receiving grant funds. If you would like to see how this is all done check out the DNR web site and look for grant and aid funding. (its really dry reading!!) Most clubs have about 6 to 8 members that are left with all the work, join and just help with what you would like to do. cool.gif

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Beeonkey,

Very good post. I currently am president of a local club and like you, do the paperwork for the DNR funding. You are definitely right about most clubs having 6-8 members do all the work. Like you said, even if a new member could help for a few hours marking trail it would help.

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Please read the posts under "Minnesota Trail Sticker."

Yes, you should join your local snowmobile club because I guarantee they need your help. Anyone who rides should join their local club. If everyone did, you wouldn't have such things as "Trail Stickers". Trails do not magically groom themselves and easements don't fall from the sky. There are a million ways to help. I used to groom trails and run errands for the Ely Igloos, it was fun!

Not only that, It is a great way to meet people who are interested in the same things that you are. You really get a sense of ownership of your club's trails when you join.

Justin

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This is my first year as the Vice President of the St. Stephen River Runners Snowmobile Club. Just to add to what others have said, this may also touch base on some local trails you might ride. Anyways, our club has 60+ members, i don't have the exact numbers nearby. Of those, about 20 attend the meetings on a regular basis every 2 weeks. I never realized the work a club puts on until i became an officer. As a club we need to find people within the club to help with groomer maintenance, groom the trails, prep the trails for the season, repair signs and bridges. The 2007-2008 season may start with a trail re-route from St. Joe to St. Stephen. If that happens, we wil have to go door to door and ask for land owners permission for a trail to cross. If all goes well, we need to make a new trail, miles through woods, field, swamp where ever. It could mean building bridges, fences, gates placing signs and so on. One of our most helpfull members does not attend our meetings on a regular basis. Every club needs support even if you don't go to all the meetings. Without club members, our trails would not exist. The yearly membership to our club not only involves snowmobiling, however we do plan a yearly trip but we also go bowling, BBQ's, make pizza's for fund raisers, Christmas parties, trailgating parties (membership drives). If you could even dedicate the one afternoon to help with trail clean up, it's a huge help. Our club has seen it's strongest growth this season, and by the looks of all the housing being built, we will need it. Feel free to contact me for more information. [email protected] or click on our clubs link. St. Stephen River Runners

Thanks,

Jamie Kroska

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I couldn't agree more with all the posts, especially the 6-8 people doing all the work. It's frustrating, but we keep plugging away to keep the sport we all love. Please join a local club as well as MN-USA. Every little bit helps.

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