Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
icewoman

bird feeding and tree bark

5 posts in this topic

I have placed a number of suet feeders on an oak tree in my yard. These feeders get a lot of attention and now the bark of the tree is getting warn off. My question is if this is going to damage the tree? The woodpeckers are not pecking at the tree but it seems to be from the claws?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do the squirrels try to get at the suet? I would think they could do more damage than the woodpecker claws. Wish I knew the answer to your question. I would think the tree could be more vulnerable to insects and diseases in the summer. But I have whole branches that the gray squirrels have chewed the bark from. Those branches don't seem to leaf out anymore, but the trees have survived.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bark removal does leave trees more vulnerable, but some trees are more at risk than others. I agree it's likely that squirrels will cause more problems in that area than birds, but depending on the tree species and the delicacy of the bark, a big enough parade of birds coming to the same spot could cause bark wear.

You can simply drive a post into the ground near the tree (a wooden post) and mount a suet feeder on the post. Birds after the suet will stage on the tree and then fly to the post, but since the suet is no longer on the tree they won't be concentrated around a single place and won't continue to wear off the bark.

Also, since you'll only have a single suet feeder (or if you put one on each side of the post you'll at least have them in exactly the same place), you'll be concentrating the suet eating birds in one location, which makes it easier for you to view them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the responce. I actually think it is from the woodpeckers. I believe I will move them to another location...I think the post idea will have to wait till spring smile Speaking of woodpeckers. My birding dreams came true yesterday. I finaly had the pilliated come to the suet feeder. I now have four species of woodpeckers coming to the feeders, it is great fun to watch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lucky you!!!! I'll bet you are reluctant to move the feeders.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Here's number 3 for the year! Not a bad find for a couple hours after work.  It was so fresh it still had wet blood on the base.
    • East wind is the worst...!! Bad juju. Always means a storm. Gonna have an East one tomorrow......and my barometer is already headin' down, in time for the 6-8" of big snow tomorrow. Watch it plummet before a big summer storm, or rise into the 30's on those warming, clear days. I've always watched the winds and barometer since I was a kid (got into the weather thing in "science class") , you can do better yourself than the forecasters do. It's easy and fun, IMO. Some fun facts:   http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2010/10/27/lowest-barometer-reading-ever-in-minnesota/
    • I guess I never associated a north wind wind lower pressure. Or a south wind with higher pressure.  Learn something new everyday
    • I watch when it drops below 29.5 Hg on down (29.0 Hg or mb; millibars) or when it swings up past 30.0 mb. That's my reference for "highs" or "lows" on my Barometer. Remember to adjust yours to your local Wx reading, they have a slot shaft in the back of the meter for that. I  love my old dial Aneroid barometer.  They last forever, too.  Mines kicking about 35 years... (That's not mine, pic is for low and high reference...)    
    • Thanks Rebel, very good answer.  I've been keeping track of the pressure for a week, now. 
    • Hey Rebel, what do you consider low and high pressure?  Perhaps a stupid question, but I just got a weather station so now I can start tracking barometric pressure. Right now the numbers don't mean much to me, been around 28-29% in the south metro the past few day and I don't know if that's low, high or middle.
    • Low pressure signals a front moving in, (Bad weather, wind may be  from the east or north) which usually puts them "on the feed", can have some hot and fast action. Likewise, a swing in the other direction, a high pressure system , (wind from the west or south) which signals clear skies and sunny weather, may do the same. The key to me, anyway, seems to be hitting it just as either front moves in. An extended low or long high may result in poor fishing. Remember the old adage, which also has to so with the pressure: "Wind from the east; fish bite the least...wind from the north , the fisherman goes not forth, wind from the south, blows the bait in the fish's mouth; wind from the west, is when the fishing is best". 
    • Those trumpers sure know how to keep things classy.
    • Is it true, the lower the pressure, the bite gets hot? Or the higher the barometric pressure the fish slow down on biting? 
  • Our Sponsors