Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Big Daddy4

Lab Paralysis

4 posts in this topic

I am looking for a little help / advice...

A week ago my 5 year old yellow lab suddenly lost the use of his hind legs. The Vet believes it is caused by a disc in the back bursting. He has also lost control of his bladder and bowel.

After a day he was able to move his right leg slightly, but no improvements since.

I am wondering if any of you have any experience with a situation like this? I really don't want to put him down, but I am not sure if there are any other options.

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! Never had this happen to me or anyone I know. Good luck to you, your pup and the decision. Keep us informed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to hear about this....what has the vet done to this point? Any meds....and definitive diagnosis? May be worth a call if the following was not discussed or ruled out.

One possibility (and needs to be dealt with within 24-48 hours):

Fibrocartilaginous Embolization

veterinarian, pet, animal, veterinary, veterinarians, pets, animals, veterinary hospital, veterinary clinic, veterinary hospitals, veterinary clinics, pet health, pet surgery, animal health, animal surgery

Spinal cord fibrocartilaginous embolization is caused by a small fragment of intervertebral disc material entering the spinal cord’s vascular system via the tissues attached to the intervertebral disc (see illustration below). Embolization is the sudden blocking of an artery by a clot of foreign material (an embolus). The tiny fragment of intervertebral disc material (embolus) results in varying degrees of damage depending on the portion of the cord supplied by the embolized blood vessel. Thus, the clinical signs are variable.

Fibrocartilaginous embolization of the spinal cord is the functional equivalent of a stroke to the spinal cord rather than to the brain. The events are acute, nonprogressive, and occur without any prior signs or warnings. Because emboli can occur in any portion of the cord, clinical signs can involve the rear limbs, all four limbs, one side of the body, or only one limb. The syndrome is not painful but can result in paralysis. After the initial spinal cord shock subsides, one side of the body frequently remains worse or is slower to show improvement.

In general, if deep pain perception is intact to the paralyzed limb(s), recovery will begin in two to three weeks with most clinical function restored by four months. In most cases, once the diagnosis and degree of clinical damage is ascertained, an accurate prognosis can be made.

Diagnosis

A tentative diagnosis of a fibrocartilaginous embolism is made based on history and neurologic examination. Radiographs (x-rays) are evaluated to ascertain the presence of degenerative discs and may outline other abnormalities in the spine including fractures and dislocations. A definitive diagnosis may require a myelogram (contrast dye study of the spine). Spinal cord swelling may be seen with a myelogram immediately after the embolus causes an infarction (a localized area of dead cells produced by occlusion of the arterial supply to that area) (see Fig. 3). If several days have passed since the onset of clinical signs, the myelogram will be normal. Other findings with a myelogram may include intervertebral disc extrusions, tumors, fractures, hematomas, or hemorrhage.

Treatment

Individuals experiencing an acute episode of fibrocartilaginous embolism are immediately treated once the diagnosis is confirmed. Intensive medical therapies are of value only during the first 24 to 48 hours after the spinal cord damage has occurred. Medications used include corticosteroids to relieve spinal cord swelling and to prevent collateral damage. Surgery is not indicated in the treatment of spinal cord infarction. After initial medical management, intensive nursing care and physical therapy are required. The goal is to maintain muscle tone while the spinal cord tissue heals.

Prognosis

The prognosis in cases of fibrocartilaginous embolization depends on many factors:

* The severity of neurologic dysfunction

* The amount of disc material that has embolized

* The degree of accompanying spinal cord swelling

* The location of the spinal cord infarction

* The overall physical condition of the patient

In general, the ability to perceive deep pain in the affected limb(s) and tail remain the major prognostic indicator. Even if paralysis is complete, the perception of deep pain remains the key to determining if permanent damage has occurred. This means that, even if paralysis has occurred, if the conscious perception of deep pain is intact a functional recovery is anticipated. The time required for recovery and the degree of neurologic improvement are quite variable. Diligent physical therapy and good nursing care are important for recovery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, my dog has had similar problems. This happened a month ago and they gave him some anti inflammatory meds and he finally came around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Those sure are pretty snowflakes..........
    • Misguided by love as pure as the driven snow.  
    •   Yep, am with ya......and most of us thank you. Should not be a difficult concept to understand.....except for a select Jv few.
    • So was I.  When I say "my equipment" won't be freezing up when I am hole hopping with the aid of my toasty warm Otter cottage, part of my equipment that won't be freezing up would be the ez ducer...   
    • Reinhardt was sincere, and I don't believe he was trying to sell anything,  He had a lot of knowledge about meat, and simply wanted to share it.   I didn't fault him for his politics, either.  He was simply misguided on that....        
    • I took Mickey in 2008. Bubbles 4 years later. Not too worried about winning as some on here .....as winning in  those years wasn't really winning, and so far, neither is picking the winner in 16, other than saying you picked the winner and "get it".
    • Had an opportunity to tag along with LeeKen to Bluestem Nature Conservancy and sit in a blind Saturday morning.  Thought it was unusual to see a deer with antlers late March.
    •     I was thinking more like Goofy=Pres. Trump
    • Murphy’s Law   I went out this afternoon trout fishing.  I questioned the wisdom of fishing on a robin’s egg blue sky day.  Trout shun sunlight.  I went outside to check the weather. The warmth of the afternoon coaxed me out of the house.     I fished a stretch I have done well on in the past.  I knew because of the bright sun I would more than likely not do well on big trout this outing.  Trout do not have eye lids and shun bright sun. When I got to the stream the outdoor temperature was 58 degrees.  I took the water temperature and it was almost 50 degrees.  That is well within a good temperature range to score some trout.     I hit the water at 2:45pm.  The sun was high in the sky and not a single cloud was in the sky.  I knew from experience that days like these I typically fished the shaded side of the stream.  There was no shaded side of the stream.      The fishing was tough.  I had lots of follows and flashes at my lure.  None seemed to want to commit.   I decided to look for cover for the trout.  I decided anything to throw a little shade on the trout would make them feel comfortable.     The trout had lock jaw.  I decided to target broken water so the trout would feel secure and come out in the bright light.  They still were bashful.  I decided another trick was in order. I was going to throw in the biggest snarly messes and let the lure drop to the bottom and give it a tweak to start the blade going.  Bang bang and I was in business.  This only worked in deep runs and i lost a few lures throwing into the mess.     I ended the outing with 24 brown trout to hand. The biggest was about 16 inches.  It was 5:30pm.  I usually get out at a bridge and today was nothing different.  I stood on the bridge looking upstream.  There was a sweet log jam just upstream of the bridge and it was in shadows.     I decided i was going to go just upstream in the shadows and cast a few more times. I was still on the bridge looking upstream. I looked at my reel and there was a loop on the spool.  This loop needed to be cast out if I was going to continue fishing.  I decided the bridge afforded the best angle and no trees in the way to cast out the loop in my spool.     I cast off the bridge.  The loop caught and dropped my cast about 15 yards upstream.  It nearly didn't land in the water.  It hit tight to the bank and I had a big snarl in my reel.  I looked down and saw my panther martin was barely in the water.  I decided to pull off some line and get this snarl out.  I made even a bigger mess.     I sat down on the bridge rail and started to mess with my giant snarl.  I again looked at my lure and it was barely in the water.  I was worried about losing the lure because of the snarl.  It was safe and barely dangling in the water.     I  really made a mess with the reel.  I was cussing it and trying to untangle it.  I lost focus on my lure in the water. I was peering over my glasses and really putting all my attention on this mess and I heard a splash sound.  I looked upstream and saw nothing.  I looked back at the reel.  I heard a louder splash and looked over the bridge at my lure suspended in the water.     My mouth dropped open wide and I stared in disbelief.  Me messing with the line caused the lure to jig up and down in the water.  This attracted a predator.  Not 2 inches from my lure was a giant trout suspended and staring at the size 9 gold panther martin deluxe waiting for it to move again.     My reel was still messed up so there was no battling this huge female trout on my reel if it decided to quit dancing with my panther martin and eat it. The bridge was at least 15 feet off the water and the idea of battling a monster trout from above was not appealing.  I worked frantically on the snarl.  It got even more messed up.     My fighting with this reel and keeping one eye on the giant female was nerve racking.  She still was very interested in my lure.  She circled it like a shark.  It was more than I could stand.  I decided if I hooked up with her with this less than optimal circumstances I would lose her and maybe kill her because of the bridge nonsense.     I decided to try to catch her another day.  The reel was non functional and i grabbed the line and lifted the lure out of the water.  What happened next is going to be relived in my dreams for the rest of my life.  The monstrous female brown bum rushed the lure as I lifted it out of the water.  It launched itself out of the water snapping at the spinner.  It was a swing and a miss. I got my wits back together and thought about cutting out the snarl and trying for her. I decided a return trip was on the agenda.  As I write this recollection I smile and cuss my circumstances.
  • Our Sponsors