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Dano2

So whats the deal

11 posts in this topic

With spiderwire?
I use it when I pull cranks, and that has been what I do most of the time for walleyes.

But now I'm willing, trying, and most of all NEEDING to learn how to catch wallys other ways, so am wondering what type of line to use that will make it easier to detect a bite, when just useing a plain jig, or lindy rigging, etc.?

thankz

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I like fireline for jigging and live bait rigging.

Use a mono or floro leader for live bait rigging.

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Light duty jigging, try PowerPro 1-8, 2-10, or 4-15.
win_free_spool.jpg
www.powerpro.com

The PowerPro 4-15 is hot for crankbait trolling. You gain depth and you need less line out to get there.

(Tip) When trolling or jigging with super-braids use a longer med action rod. You rip less lips loose and you get more fish in the net.

I like 7' to 9' Berkley Re-Flex med action e-glass rods for day or night trolling.
ReFlex.jpg
RFC702-1H.jpg
AddPhoto1.jpg

WORKHORSE_PreDetail.jpg
The Workhorse rod series is another great E-Glass blank trolling rod option. The 7'2" is a good model. They are very popular with big lake system trollers. The Price is right too! If you snoop on the net you can find some great deals on Workhouse rods right now. E-Glass is tough stuff, it will last.


Ed "Backwater Eddy" Carlson

get_file.html?mid=172

Backwater Guiding "ED on the RED"

[This message has been edited by Backwater Eddy (edited 06-17-2003).]

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I like a sensitive Rod and 6lb Test Trilene for Rigging and Jigging. You'll feel either a solid "Bump" or your line will simpy get tight (almost as if snagged) when Lindy Rigging for Walleyes.

Another big part of this scenario is where you're planning on fishing--Mille Lacs Mud, or "snaggy" Rock piles?

------------------
Chells

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Well, not knowing much I just threw some stuff together, (typical rookie , eh?)

I should have asked first and rigged later, but like some of you have said, it'll be alot of trial and error to learn what to use.

I have a 6' Berkley Lightining rod, med. action.
I have 10# 4# diameter spider wire fusion, then the lindy rig, 3' leader 1/2 ounce weight, plain hook.
I'm going to be going for the eyes at either Pelican or Lida soon,( if any of you are familier to these lakes) probably Lida, and it sounds like they are biting in about the 15-24ft. range, but I'm not sure if the bottem is sand, rubble, rocky or what, guess I'll find out.
But what do you think of this setup so far?
thanks

Just reading my map guide and it looks like the main spots I'll be trying are mostley sandy bottem around the points

[This message has been edited by Dano2 (edited 06-17-2003).]

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Food for thought.

Experiment with longer snells. Most of the ones I make range in the 6-10ft range and I most commonly use the longer ones. I have a bias to use florocarbon when makeing the snells use any where from 6-10 lb. Everything else looks great. I have been a longtime user of fireline, but just recently picked up the spiderwire fusion to give it a shot. Heres hoping its as good if not better than the fireline.

Good Luck and better Fishing!

SUNNYD

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Why do some of you use such long leaders?
Lindner claims the shorter are better, basically you dont have to wait so long to set the hook?
Now, I would obviously take advice from him, but hes not my hero or anything, so I will always take 2nd , 3rd, 4th etc., opinions.
Thanks

basically I guess I 'll just see how close they are to the bottem and go from there, but I dont understand , why a 6-10 foot leader?
Why not just use a 1/2 ounce, or 3/8 or so jig instead?

Anyone use these soft stops for adjusting snell length?

thanks

[This message has been edited by Dano2 (edited 06-18-2003).]

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I guess CHELLS answered my question about a longer leader in a different post.
Funny how one forgets what they read when trying to consume so much info. at once.

BUT, heh, my question now is:
Chells says when you have a longer leader, it gives the fish more time to hold the bait in their mouth before you detect it, which I guess is suppose to be a GOOD thing, but this long a leader is for fish around approx.3-5ft. off the bottem.
Now what if the wallys are holding tight near the bottem?

thanks again

[This message has been edited by Dano2 (edited 06-18-2003).]

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Hi Dano,

If the fish are holding tight to the bottom and they are in a "positive", of feeding "Mood" then by all means you can use a 3-4ft. leader.

My experience has been that typically fish holding tight to the bottom, especially Walleyes are in a negative, or non-feeding mood. The Walleyes I target first are the ones I see cruising above the lake bottom or generally not holding tight to any structure, rather, they are searching for and feeding close to structure.

The reason some of us prefer longer leaders on our snells is that we fish for larger, more experienced Walleyes that tend to be very saavy to any tension they feel when they take our bait and will spit it out as fast as they inhale it. The longer leader is more forgiving than a 2-3 or 4 ft. leader; the long leader widens your "margin of error" when rigging with a slip sinker, which you always will hold a foot or so above the bottom or structure you're fishing.

If you fish with a short leader and you feel a "take" you release the line from your index finger (you're holding it with your bail open while you're fishing). I hope this isn't confusing, but I think you get the picture. Anyway, if you're holding the sinker a foot or so off the bottom (to prevent it from snagging or dragging) and you feel a strike, you drop the weight a foot, a fish will probably feel this happen and spit your offering immediately.

A long leader will provide you a wider margin of error--you sense the "take" after the fish inhales your bait, the fish doesn't feel any tension, hence, more hook-ups grin.gif

------------------
Chells

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I switched to 6'-7' leaders a month ago and I have caught more walleyes in that month than the rest of my life combined. I have literally hundereds of jigs and spinners but a simple colored hook with 6'-7' feet of mono seems to be the magic ticket, at least for early season. Maybe its the extra motion the bait gets back that far. I don't know, but it sure seems effective. Good luck.

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