Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

aczr2k

Wfco Converter output?

12 posts in this topic

I've been looking for the amp hour charging rate for the typical WFCO converter, I can't seem to find any information on it.  I don't think mine is keeping up with the battery draw.  The only thing I have connected to the WFCO supplied dc output is the furnace.  My stereo/amp and other fuse panel is connected directly to the battery.  I'm thinking I need to add another charging source to the battery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Which converter do you have?  There are several models with varying charging outputs and features.  Also take into account the length and gauge of wire running from your converter to the battery as this can be a funnel to the charging capacity to your battery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

depending on the model your furnace should draw 5-8 amps

Blown fuse?

Bad battery? How big of a battery? is it a deep cycle?

What Model is your wfco?

Measure the converter output voltage per these instruction> http://wfcoelectronics.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/4-3_Operator-Manual.pdf

I'd measure your current draw on every thing and move your other stuff to the panel instead of directly to the battery. Most meters will only go 8-10 amps so you may have to test things individually write it all down and see if your current draw exceeded the output of the converter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, aczr2k said:

I've been looking for the amp hour charging rate for the typical WFCO converter, I can't seem to find any information on it.  I don't think mine is keeping up with the battery draw.  The only thing I have connected to the WFCO supplied dc output is the furnace.  My stereo/amp and other fuse panel is connected directly to the battery.  I'm thinking I need to add another charging source to the battery.

 

I think you have the Suburban NT30SP?  4.5amp draw.  I know nothing about the WFCO converter, but I learned something about my Progressive Dynamics PD4045, and your WFCO may be similar.    

 

To monitor my batteries, I put in some fancy schmancy Victron BMV700 gauge.  It monitors and calculates almost anything you'd want to know about a battery and anything you have attached to it.

 

What I learned is that the PD4045 doesn't keep the batteries at a constant 100% (like I thought).  It actually lets the batteries discharge about 10-20%, and then rapidly gets them back to 100%.  I've been trying to get the specifics as to how long it takes to get them back to 100%, but it is very fast.  Haven't been quick enough to catch the charge cycle to time it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I think it is the 8735 converter.  Battery is a new group 27 Cabelas AGM (only 1 battery).  I can't rewire my lights and stereo to the converter. I have an 8 gage power and ground from the battery running up the to wheel well storage where I have an additional 12v fuse panel for lights and radio.  The sub amp is also wired directly to the battery.  I have not checked the output from the converter, its brand new also but that doesn't guarantee it works.  The furnace is a 30K suburban and it is wired to the converter.  Reason I know there is a problem is on Saturday I was messing around with the radio, setting the amp etc. and noticed that the led lights would flicker when the bass would hit, and yes I was running the radio hard.  Checked the battery voltage and it was down to 11.5 volts with the converter plugged in.  Hooked up my Battery Tender charger set to 8 amps and the battery recovered and was fine after that.

Edited by aczr2k

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just was doing a little bit of google research and I might have figured out the problem, I don't have a fuse in the spot above the reverse polarity fuse.  From what I read a fuse should be there to send power out the red wire to the battery.  The manual is a little vague on that or I just plain missed it.  Now if someone could verify that for me it would be awesome?  My house is up north at the farm so I can't just walk out and check.  Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Sounds like the fuse would be your problem.

 

Put a capacitor on your amp lead it will prevent the LED's from flickering when the bass hits. That is not uncommon with high powered subs.  https://www.amazon.com/BOSS-AUDIO-CPBK2-Farad-Capacitor/dp/B00BKV3DZW/ref=sr_1_1?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1483988336&sr=1-1&keywords=capacitor+car+audio

Make sure to use your remote turn on feature of the radio so your amp isn't sucking juice when you don't need it.

FYI if you need the fuse size I think i have the same unit at home and can look for you if needed.

Edited by vtx1029

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah if you would, I thought I had read it should be a 40 amp?  I think that is the size of the reverse polarity fuse.  It never dawned on me until I read earlier that a fuse should be in that location, of course had I disconnected the lead and checked the output I would have discovered it as well, but still wouldn't have known why.  The book/manual makes no mention of adding a fuse in that location. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a 40 amp fuse. I have the exact same converter 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have 8735 30 amp WFCO converter. The main purpose of wiring your DC through the converter is so that you can charge your batteries when on shoreline without having a draw. Have you checked to see what the draw from the battery is when you are using your radio hard? The WFCO has 3 charging modes 13.2V, 13.6V, and 14.4 V.

 

EDIT: After doing some reading, it appears that the amount of amps being delivered to the batter is dependent on the demand on the converter, so it may not be as beneficial as I had thought to wire directly into the DC circuits. That being said, you still need to figure out your amperage requirement and go from there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't checked my draw yet, it will be on the list.  Now that I know I need a fuse in that location it will be actually charging the battery.  My house has not left the shop, still finishing it up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now