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TWISTERSOCK

Rubber Roof help?

7 posts in this topic

Hi everyone!

I am about to install my rubber roof and have heard a couple ways to do it. So I would like to ask some of your opinions on it.

#1 glue the rubber roof and let the rubber run down the side of the walls with termination strips. Then run the siding up so the actual rubber would be behind the siding.

Question on this method. Why would anyone want the water to shed behind the siding?

#2 Put drip cap around the edge of the roof and glue the rubber roof to the top of the drip cap.

Question : Would the glue hold up to driving/wind conditions and not just peel off at high rates of speed?

#3 Here is an idea I've came up with. Let the rubber roof roll down the edge and then bring the siding to the top and place the drip cap on. then cut strips of rubber and glue the strips to the top of the drip cap and existing rubber to make a seam.

I would really appreciate any help with this!

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I ran my siding up to about 2" below the top of the wall. The rubber roof overlaps the siding by around 3", which is then sealed off with a strip of floor threashold. The water rolls off the threashold and over the siding. 2 yrs. and 2500 miles later, there have been no issues.

house3.jpg

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I hear ya. I debated this problem for some time. Here are the options that I boiled it down to. The first picture sounds like your #3. Other option uses the termination bar like your #1 but has it out over the siding (not sure how well this would work).

RoofOptions.jpg

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Wow thanks for the awesome pictures and the great help!! Much Appreciated!!!

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I did the same as in lightningbg's artwork, with the exception being I used a 'J' channel as my termination strip (from Menards). It acts as a gutter so I don't have water dripping all around the house, only at the corners. And definitely DO glue your rubber roofing down securely! I have seen houses on the highway, that the roofing is so stretched out, they look like they have a big black balloon tied to the house!!

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I did the same as in lightningbg's artwork, with the exception being I used a 'J' channel as my termination strip (from Menards). It acts as a gutter so I don't have water dripping all around the house, only at the corners. And definitely DO glue your rubber roofing down securely! I have seen houses on the highway, that the roofing is so stretched out, they look like they have a big black balloon tied to the house!!

Sounds like they didn't glue the rubber membrane down correctly, or the glue didn't stick. Not good to have it loose like that.

Be great if you could have got some pictures of it. laugh

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I've worked for three different flat roofing companys, and what I'd do is glue the rubber completely down (depending on the type of glue you use, you might just have to glue the rubber or both surfaces) make sure you let the glue set up, then run the rubber over the egde. Cut the rubber so your going to be short of the face of your drip edge. Then we make custom metal (whatever color) with about 2 and half inches on the roof. Then screw the metal down through the metal into the rubber. Then I use a primer and prime the metal and onto the rubber, and we have a 5" flashing strip and apply (flash in the metal to the rubber) and use a seam roller and roll all the 5".

Alright I know you probally don't have access to all this but if you have any ?'s I'd be more than happy to help you out.

montyross789@yahoo.com

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