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SJU70

Permission on land

4 posts in this topic

I was doing some scouting early on in the morning, and as the landowners didn't appear to be dairy farmers and therefore probably sleeping, I wasn't about to knock on the door at 7 am. Later on this afternoon, I went up and no one was in, and it appeared to be more of a cabin and not a permanent residence. I think I may have found a phone number for the guy. I am kind of new at this but I always figured that it was way better to ask in person than as a voice over the phone. Any thoughts on getting in contact?

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Definately better to ask in person, but sometimes it is just next to impossible to catch them. A phone call is better than nothing.

DL

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Just call and explain your situation. Tell him that you tried to contact him in person but was unsuccessful and that's why you are calling him. Usually most Land Owners already have their mind made up before you talk to them but in most cases where the land owner's leaning towards a "no" politeness might convince him to give you chance. When asking for permission I always look at it as if it were a job interview minus the suit and tie of course. I know I wouldn't let just anyone into my backyard. I'd like to talk to the guy first, and in most cases land owners are pretty resonable and understand that if you weren't a decent person you probably wouldn't have asked in the first place.

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either way the worst he can say is no. i choose to call land owners many times initially instead of finding them in person, mostly because at this upcoming time of year, farmers are extremely busy and getting ahold of them on their cell when they are combining 30 miles away from their farm will save you some time. one thing i do try to arrange is to either ask the farmer to stop by the field and meet face to face, or visit their residence after the hunt, and at the very least, leave a note thanking them for the oppertunity to hunt their land.

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