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Holy Canvas

Husqvarna 125 L trimmer

4 posts in this topic

My third season with the trimmer. It's starting to bog down after about two to three seconds on the throttle. If I don't back off when it starts bogging down, it will die. Tried some Sea Foam through the carb, then some through the gas. Air filter and spark plug are fine also. Muffler and spark arrestor are both clean. Next I wanna replace the fuel filter, but don't see it. I assume it's inside the gas tank.

Has anyone else done this with their's? Is it a pain, or not too bad? After the fuel filter, and maybe a new fuel line, I'm clueless what else I could do? Figuered I'd have better luck on this forum, then the Tools forum. Thanks for any help?

Holy Canvas!

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If it's possible, I would try to completely remove the muffler assembly.

On the Echo trimmers I run, about once / year I have to go through and pull the mufflers off and remove the carbon buildup at the exhaust port, it will build up enough to completely plug that hole.

Pull off the muffler and see if you've got an abnormal amount of buildup there.

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The biggest problem with all string trimmers is the operator.

Too many people just 'stroll' along at idle pulling the throttle a little to trim. All of these machines will carbon in the exhaust (port, muffler, screen - all) with All oils including AMSOIL when run this way.

The answer is literally 'go to work.' These machines are built to be run at wide open throttle, and when run at idle too long run too cold and will carbon. Pull the throttle all the way and work as fast as the machine will go.

Another problem that causes the same thing is removing the guard and using way too long a string. The guard has a little metal piece on it that is a cutter to cut off excess string. When run with too long a string, it acts as a big 'flywheel' and the engine won't rev up high enough to run hot enough.

Many here run the AMSOIL Saber Professional in their ice augers -- use the same in all your 2-cycle string cutters, blowers, chain saws, hedge trimmers, etc. -- you will run smokeless (or nearly), more power, faster reving, cleaner burning. (But in a cold, not allowed to rev-up air-cooled engine you will get carbon build-up in the exhaust with any oil. You run your ice-auger wide open throttle to drill, run your string trimmer wide open throttle and go to work.)

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The biggest problem with all string trimmers is the operator.

Too many people just 'stroll' along at idle pulling the throttle a little to trim. All of these machines will carbon in the exhaust (port, muffler, screen - all) with All oils including AMSOIL when run this way.

The answer is literally 'go to work.' These machines are built to be run at wide open throttle, and when run at idle too long run too cold and will carbon. Pull the throttle all the way and work as fast as the machine will go.

Another problem that causes the same thing is removing the guard and using way too long a string. The guard has a little metal piece on it that is a cutter to cut off excess string. When run with too long a string, it acts as a big 'flywheel' and the engine won't rev up high enough to run hot enough.

Many here run the AMSOIL Saber Professional in their ice augers -- use the same in all your 2-cycle string cutters, blowers, chain saws, hedge trimmers, etc. -- you will run smokeless (or nearly), more power, faster reving, cleaner burning. (But in a cold, not allowed to rev-up air-cooled engine you will get carbon build-up in the exhaust with any oil. You run your ice-auger wide open throttle to drill, run your string trimmer wide open throttle and go to work.)

I'll be honest, I do both of what theoilman said.

I run my trimmer slow, and I run too long of string.

First thing I do when I get a trimmer is take off the blade that keeps the line short.

I run the throttle slow so I can save trimmer line against chainlink fencing, or if I'm trying to get near plants, trees or siding.

You'd be surprised how much trimmer line you can go through when you start trimming a school districts' chain link fencing.

I know that I'm going to get carbon buildup, and for me it takes about 1/2 hour to take the muffler apart, clear out the buildup and put it back together.

It's alot better than damaging trees, taking out siding, or respooling the line every 100 yards.

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