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AWH

Lowrance X-65 vs. X-85

5 posts in this topic

I'm doing some shopping around for the accessories I'm going to have on my first boat come next year. The electronics issue is what I'm having the hardest time with. Reeds has some great prices on the Lowrance X-65 and X-85 right now. I was originally leaning towards the X-65, but with the price they have on the X-85 right now, I'm in limbo on what to do.

I haven't used any Lowrance electronics before. What would I be gaining by going with the X-85 over the X-65 and is it worth the extra $100? I know the screen resolution is going to be better on the X-85. But is it really going to show you anything more?

Any advantages that you can tell me would be greatly appreciated. Also, any comments about the two units in general would be great.

Thanks,
AWH

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If you are an avid fisherperson you will want the better resolution that the X-75 and X-85 have to offer. I'm not sure why you didn't mention the X-75, but it should be priced in-between the other two and has the same resolution of the X-85. The only difference that I know of between the 85 and 75 is the depth they can read to, the 85 can go to 3000 ft. If you are just looking for something that will give accurate depth readings and OK resolution get the X-65, otherwise I recommend the X-75. Hope this helps you out!

~firstchoice

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A higher pixel count helps to see more detail because each pixel is showing less area in the water column. Try the tutorial section at www.lowrance.com it answeres a lot of questions about LCD graphs.
The X-75 has 600ptp power and the X-85 has 3000ptp.

Rob

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I have owned the X85 for two years now and just love it.In Canada we were able to see even the little gizzard shad and small shiners that the walleye were after.Bottom definition is superb, but you will have to adjust the sensetivity in shallow muddy bottom. The 3000PTP is a little to much for shallow soft bottoms, but with a little adjusting it works great.It has about one inch seperation from bottom but if you watch it close enough you will be able to see the transition between fish on bottom and even gravel to silt transitions.
I think the X75 would be a good choice also if the budget wont let you get the 85.

Benny

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I THINK LOWRANCE QUIT MAKING THE X-75!!!
SPEND THE EXTRA $100.00 AND GET THE BETTER UNIT I HAVE A x-65 AND A X-75 AND THERE IS A NIGHT AND DAY DIFFERNCE!


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