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Bridle rig a live bait with a rubber band?

7 posts in this topic

Bridle rig a live bait with a rubber band

Dark30, SteveD, Backwater Ed, LFC, Dtro, Dennis Steele Or Anyone?

Since yesterday I have been searching FM and the web for a certain technique on how to rig large live suckers crazy.

When I was cutting up some fresh large suckers I caught yesterday to freeze for cut-bait I was experimenting with different ways to rig live suckers threw the head. I was running braid threw the eyes, up threw the lips, letting the hook dangle and even trying ways to just pierce the hook in the head region. While doing this my mind keeps bring up a technique I was told or read about using a rubber band threw the eyes.

Can anyone point me in the right direction of a thread that had this info in it (I know I have seen pics of this being done)? If no thread is to be had, if someone can post what they have done using a rubber band threw the eyes, that would be great smile. I might have heard this from someone else who is not on FM also????

I feel I have an idea, but I am most interested in how the rubber band is affixed to the line. I think it involved a snap swivel on the line and the snap holding the rubber band????

Thanks in advance for any info on this. I should have taken some pics of what I was doing to see if this was correct?

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Try doing a search on a Bridle or Bridal Rig

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Most saltwater guys use a needle with wax line or wire behind the eyes. Push the threaded needle through and twist a loop.

I've killed more bait this way than hooking them through the lips, but the hook on a bridle rig is wide open and the bait never casts off.

Try the same technique through the nose and gingerly toss out the bait and you might have better luck keeping the bait alive.Hans

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Thanks Dtro for the tip and I even changed the name of this thread because of it. It has helped out with other methods, but not with the one I am looking for.

49858-hooking-live-bait-w-rubber-band-he49859-hooking-live-bait-w-rubber-band-bo

Hanso I was using a thin piece of stainless steel wire last night to pull threw the braid and rubber band.

I did not like it first, put after seeing some video of salt water guys attaching the rubber band right to the hook, it has peaked my interested in this method. I will try and take some images tonight on how I was doing it on my rigs with the rubber band and snap swivel on the line.

Thanks!

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I've bridle hooked the head of a sheepshead for cut bait for flatheads. The bridle hookup works pretty good although I haven't caught a flat on one yet.

I use small rubberbands that you get from the orthodontist for using on braces. They hold the hook well and are pretty simple to use.

I slide the rubberband on the hook, run a crochet hook through the eyes of the bait and hook the rubber band with the crochet hook and pull it back through the eye, then take the circle hook and slide it through the loop of the rubberband and presto a bridle hooked bait.

The rubberband has a tendency to slip off the crochet hook easily so I made a bridle tool out of a piece of wire with a deeper bend at the tip to hold the rubberband. It works a little better. You need a thin wire that is still strong enough to force through the bait.

I haven't been concerned with trying a live bait. I think a large bloody head will attract a flathead pretty well. A large sucker head would work about the same way as a sheepshead, I just have never had a large sucker head to try out yet.

For a live bait bridle hook I'm going to try a bullhead but go through the lips or the nose instead of the eyes. I tried a bullhead's eyes one day when I was experimenting with the rig but the eyes are too far apart and the head is hard as a rock and the needle won't go through that hard head.

The whole reason for using the bridle hook is so that the hook is not imbedded in the bait and when you do a hook set the hook is wide open to grab the fish that you are after and will not turn and instead go back into your bait.

Here is a look at how I have done it:

BridledBaitIDA2.jpg

Here is a pic I found on the internet that I patterned my approach to:

bridlerig.jpg

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Thanks Steve for the info. I have some ideas I am going to put into action.

The last couple times I have been out and used large suckers I just did not like the regular old hooking in the back and what I was using for going threw the eyes.

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Try doing a search on a Bridle or Bridal Rig

Yep got nothing, but [PoorWordUsage].

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