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Deer stand


Fowlguy

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You must practice out of a tree before you go out and hunt. you should not have to shoot hi or low unless the deer is farther away than you want to either shoot hi or you the next pin. It takes a lot of practice to get use to this. I still am getting used to it!

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I have learned after alot of practice that it is important to lean at the waist while keeping your upper body straight, and put the pin on the deer where you want the arrow to hit. Don't drop your bow arm or you'll shoot high.

Some people drop their bow arm to get the pin on the deer and forget about their draw arm and leave it level to the ground. If you do this, you will shoot high.

Keep your upper body in good form like a "T" with the top of the T as an imaginary line across your shoulders and the "leg" of the T as your spine, then lean at the waist, keeping your drawing arm-elbow pointing directly away from the direction you want the arrow to go, like you do when shooting from the ground. Know your yardage from the base of your tree to your target, if you use a laser rangefinder and check distances by ranging trees, try to range the trees at the same level that you are sitting. If you range from your stand, 15 ft. up a tree, to a spot on the ground, the laser rangefinder will give you a reading that is longer than the actual horizontal distance. ALWAYS shoot the horizontal distance as gravity's effect on arrow flight will be the same over say 20 yards or 30 yards whether you're standing on the ground or shooting to a spot 20 or 30 yards (or whatever distance) from your treestand. The angle of the arrows flight does not effect how gravity will effect the arrow's drop. One trick I did was to take a 100 ft. rope and mark 10, 20 and 30 yard marks on it, then tie flags to trees around your stand location so you have a visual idea who far that deer is from you based on horizontal distance. Or laser distances from the base of the tree. Hope this helps. Repeated practice is the best teacher. Best of Luck.

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Same thing as I replied. Apply the same to shooting uphill or down. Shoot for the distance that the animal would be if you were on the same horizontal level. The animal may be 40 yards from your eye downhill or uphill from you but is actually only 25 yards away if you were both standing on a flat area. You would shoot for 25 yards, aiming based on the angle the animal is compared to you so that your exit hole is on the opposite side of the animal and hit the animal. If you shot for 40 yards, your arrow would sail over the target. I've seen some articles in Bowhunter magazine about this and I'm sure there are some on the net, also.

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