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I really doubt this but I have to ask; is it possible to get to Shoal Lake through the end of Portage Bay at the Deadman Portage? It looks awfully shallow and both sides of the portage, but stranger things have happened cool Anyone have any info?

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Back in high school I had read a book titled Portage Bay written by Paul Wellman. Has anyone else read this book? It is very interesting and it is the authors account of trips made to Portage Bay Camp. I would assume that this camp no longer exists since I have found no history on the web. Its location is near the actual portage in Portage Bay. In his book he describes the excellent walleye fishing on Shoal Lake. I can only assume that years of over fishing has destroyed the walleye population on this lake because I have heard of only northerns being caught. I have since reading this book intended on researching this out by visiting the area but have been unable to. Does anyone have any information concerning Portage Bay camp or its former owners Joe and Ailene McKeever? Within the book there is a chapter titled Over the Poratge and Back. The book decribes the portage as a half mile long, the first few hundred feet are deceptive, a plesant path in the woods. Then it turns into essentially a swamp with a narrow trail along side. According to the book the trail had been used by Indians for thousands of years because it had been the most direct route to areas to the Northwest via Shoal Lake. Check out Google Earth you can see it there. John

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've read the book, a few interesting chapters in it. How's the fishing there? Would love to try it sometime though I've heard it's a disaster for lower units. Anybody have any first-hand info?

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  • 11 years later...
Guest Roger
On 4/23/2009 at 6:28 PM, john 613 said:

Back in high school I had read a book titled Portage Bay written by Paul Wellman. Has anyone else read this book? It is very interesting and it is the authors account of trips made to Portage Bay Camp. I would assume that this camp no longer exists since I have found no history on the web. Its location is near the actual portage in Portage Bay. In his book he describes the excellent walleye fishing on Shoal Lake. I can only assume that years of over fishing has destroyed the walleye population on this lake because I have heard of only northerns being caught. I have since reading this book intended on researching this out by visiting the area but have been unable to. Does anyone have any information concerning Portage Bay camp or its former owners Joe and Ailene McKeever? Within the book there is a chapter titled Over the Poratge and Back. The book decribes the portage as a half mile long, the first few hundred feet are deceptive, a plesant path in the woods. Then it turns into essentially a swamp with a narrow trail along side. According to the book the trail had been used by Indians for thousands of years because it had been the most direct route to areas to the Northwest via Shoal Lake. Check out Google Earth you can see it there. John

 

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Guest Roger

My first visit to Portage Bay was in 1964 with my Dad.

Mr. McKeever picked us up by boat in Kenora.

My last trip was in 1993 with my two nephews and my Dad after the camp had been sold.

 Many great memories, and yes you could hit rock structure nearly everywhere in the bay if not careful.

 We portages to Shoal Lake every year we went. What a smallmouth and northern paradise.

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