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redhead77

To Fix Or Not To Fix?

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I was planning on getting my first hunting dog this spring and I don't know if I should get it fixed or not. I have not ever had my own dog before so I dont know what to do
I would like your opinion or any advice you may have,
Thanks

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unless you plan on breeding it get it fixed. If you get a female there are many health resons to spay her, and you wont have strays around. If you get a male he wont be a stray.

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I'd wait until the dog has grown a bit first before spaying or neutering. I don't have anything scientific supporting me but it seems like the vets like to spay/neuter early because it's easier for them and not the dog. I'd like to believe that a dog should go through it's prime growing period "intact" and let it develop it's skeletal and muscular structure before the surgery. Intuitively, just makes sense to me. BTW, I do agree that if you're not going to breed, spaying/neutering is the responsibe thing to do. If you're looking for labs, I have an add in the "Classifieds" forum you can check out.

[This message has been edited by Long Gray Line (edited 02-14-2004).]

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If you don’t plan on breeding, fix him/her right away. I’ve had 4 female labs fixed by age 8 month and have had no problems. Wait and you run the risk of a stray male dropping by or her running off the get a piece. My new 8-month-old black lab female was just fixed a few weeks ago. 3 days after I got her back she got [PoorWordUsage]ed at me for putting her in the kennel while I went out on the lake fishing. 5 minutes later she was at the fishhouse door. Turns out she can jump the 6’ kennel fence!! Looks like I’ll be adding a roof to the kennel. I couldn’t believe she could use her stomach muscles like that only three days after the operation. If she was that determined to go fishing I can only imagine what would have happened if she had went into cycle. If she can jump out you could also find a male dog in her kennel in the morning! Best of luck.

Crusher

[This message has been edited by Crusher (edited 02-15-2004).]

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Unless you are going to spend a big pile of $$ and time on the dog please get it fixed.

This will benefit you and the health of the dog a lot. Since this is your first I would suggest not taking on a litter of puppies too.

Make this dog a good one for you and enjoy learning the hunting training necessary and then on your next dog you can go for a breeder. It is a lot to take on right away. To breed you should have proven the dog in the field and only go for the best stud or dam.

Fixing them does not take away from their abilities.

Sounds like you will have fun this summer getting the pup ready for Fall. You could have your dog back from training by September and begin learning together this Fall in the field.

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