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Scoot

How old when you "hang it up"???

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My dad bowhunted until he was about 50 or so. He basically hunted until he got his two boys involved and experienced enough so he wasn't required to tag along for us. For some reason that I can't explain, I always assumed I'd do the same thing- I'd hunt until I got my kids out in the woods enough so that they were skilled and experienced enough to not need me along. However, the more I hunt, the more I think that's silly. I'm 36 and have been bowhunting deer for 25 years. I'm excited to get my little boy and girl out in the stand with me in not so many years, but I also don't ever see the day that I'll quit bowhunting. I'm not sure why I thought I'd want to or need to quit when I was about 50, but that just seems like silliness to me now! I assume my rationale was based in simply copying what my dad did. However, I know some serious bowhunters who are in the 60's and 70's and they love it as much as ever. I hope to be like that when I "grow up".

Does anyone else have a "plan for retirement" from bowhunting? If yes, I wonder if your plan will change as much as mine did...

P.S. Sorry, I realize this post has sort of a thinking-out-loud kinda feel to it, but I'm curious to hear if others have had similar thoughts.

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My dad got me started when I was 12. He hung my stands and gave up his good trees for me. Now I hang his stands and have given up a few good trees for him. He is 60 now and talks of the day he will no longer hunt but until he decides that I will try to accomidate him, maybe switching to ladder stands or using climbing sticks.

This past fall he bow killed two nice bucks, a ten and a weird 8 so I am thinking he is still good-to-go for a few more years.

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I will quit bow hunting when I can no longer draw at least a 40 pounder or when they pry my bow from my cold dead hands. I don't need to bag a record or even the dumbest smallest of does. It is just in me to get out there! I am 50 now and was out today scouting for miles. Climbing ridges, butt sliding in the snow and clawing my way back to where there are no typical hunter signs ( carelessly broken trees and bushes to clear lanes ) It keeps me young and I'll do battle with the grim reaper himself to make it to the next season.

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At 55 I'm still getting out there but the trees are harder to climb. With a total knee replacement in a month, I should be good to go for many more years.

When I cannot get 25' up the tree, then I will archery hunt in my ground blind.

I typically use a new bow for a minimum of ten years and I just purchased a new one so I would guess that I will be out there at 65.

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My Dad is 85 with a bad shoulder. He just switched from his left handed bow to a right handed so he can continue to shoot. My Mom a few years back, at 71, shot the biggest buck in camp that year. smile

Guess I have some big shoes to fill.

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I'm 51 and plan on buying the lifetime archery license, and by my calculations it will take me 14 years of not buying my license to break even. After that, I'll be money ahead every year. smile

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I will be out there until i can no longer pull the bow back. I guess I have to set my sights high, because my grandpa is 82 and still kicking deer butt! I'm only 26 so I have a long road ahead of me.

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I plan to bowhunt until I am no longer able, even then I will probably get a crossbow permit and hunt from the ground. I just love being out in the woods and I couldn't ever imagine hanging it up as long as I can physically get out there.

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I can't imagine quitting when I hit 50. The guy that turned me on to bowhunting is 72 and shows no sign of stopping. I hope that I can do the same.

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only 64 yrs old , started at 21 yrs.knee replacement 3 yrs ago, a climber stand works best for me. stay within 3/4 mile from camp and thank God for four-wheelers for draging. my son started bow hunting at 12 yrs. [now 33], the turn around is nice break, nice to watch the tent get put up. riding instead of driving is good. [ nach-with my advice.]

when to quit? they make motorized wheel- chairs right?

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nightcrawler, have you thought about a ladder stand? All the old guys in our party (like me) went to them and they are pretty easy to put up, get up in, and are nice and study once clamped to the tree. I'll never go back.

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leechman , got a good one and love it, but it stays closer to camp , takes two trips to take in but have in a good location. the climber give me more mobilty for the wind . nothing like setting it up for a M>W wind than blow E> for two weeks.

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Night, opp's sorry about that, frown I thought this post was about old guys and how long "we" all may go before we stop climbing trees, draging deer, putting up with bad weather, getting up early when no one is making us, putting up with some of the jerk-baits in our hunting camps because their related to someone, c r a p p ing over a log, sore everything at the end of the day, not seeing the big one, crabby wifes, stupid new laws, not seeing or hearing as well anymore,ect, ect! Well like I said earlier on my post, when it stops working or falls off, is when they'll close the lid on me I guess! grin P.S I notice your up in P/Rapids. We hunt up at the Browns in Akely!

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My "old man" will be 61 at the end of the month. He has definately slowed down in bowhunting but still does it. He has had bad knees in recent years but had a full knee replacement last week and plans on increasing his hunting next year. He added muzzleloader hunting a few years ago. He hunts out of a ground blind quite often now also.

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I will never have enough time to quit I hope. I should have lots of years left since I am only 26. My grandpa quit hunting before I was old enough to hunt. But when I turned 12 and was old enought to hunt. He said he would hunt till he killed one more buck. The funny thing is every year he drew a doe tag and got his doe. I know he had chances just about every year. So five years ago he finaaly shot a buck and gave it up he was 75 then. When he quit he told me and my dad he only hunted to be with us. Its not that we live far apart I see him quite often. I am tring to get him this year he is now 80. I dont gun hunt but if I can get him out there I will.

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We had a memeber of our party who had cancer and we knew it was our last year with him...I think he was flirting with 65 but this was rifle. We set up a ground blind got him out there and gave him a phone incases something happened. That SOB shot the biggest buck of his life that year. He was soo happy to get that deer which I can't blame him. He later passed on in the spring and last year when i did the european mount on his deer it was dang hard to keep a dry eye. When I showed it to our party guys I never saw cry in my life even at the funeral were in full tears. Now it's sitting at the head of the kitchen table where we always meet every morning/lunch/dinner every day. He may be gone but never will be forgotten.

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I'm 50 and this was my first year of bow hunting. Have a summit climber & I had a great time. No success, but worth every minute.

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