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Luvsoutdoors

Caulking kitchen backsplash

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I need to replace caulk between backsplash wall(ceramic)and counter. How do you get the old off without scratching tile??

But the BIGGER problem is how do you get a good line behind where the faucets are since theres no room and caulk tube is too short?? Its my project when hubby deer hunting. Thanks

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Be sure to test an area in a corner or out of the way first. I have not had any problems with the method below.

use a single edge razor blade for the tile. scrape down with a slight angle toward the left or right. Buy a lg pack of blades if you have a decent sized counter. Dull tools cause injuries.

If the countertop is granite or tile use same procedure, only go towards the backsplash. If your countertop is formica or has a wood top to the backsplash, you have to be careful, I would NOT use a blade on formica or the wood.

One more thing there are two types of caulk basically, latex and 100% silicone. You will be able to tell because the silicone will stay rubbery forever. The latex on the other hand turns hard. after several years the latex caulk loses it's moisture and is much tougher to remove. The above detail is for silicone caulk, hard latex will be a chore.

You should wear safety glasses in case a blade were to break.

Good luck.

Dan

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The previous caulk is silicone and thats what I'm replacing it with colored silicone. In a big tube w/ caulk gun-

BUT how do you do a good job behind the faucets??? Is there an extension or something for the caulk tube nozzle?? Thanks again

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Put a line of 3/4" wide masking tape along the edge of the wall tile and also along the edge of the countertop. Leave a space between the two that will be filled with caulk. Your finger will be the tool that you use to "tool" the joint. You'll have to guess the proper spacing that your finger will leave a concave shaped caulk joint. Your finger should touch both tape lines but the middle is where the caulk will be left in the concave manner. Put the silicone down as neatly as you can, then run your finger along the joint shaping the silicone along the tape joint. A bit of soapy water to dip your finger in will be needed to keep the silicone from sticking to your finger. When you've got the excess silicone removed and are happy with the joint appearance carefully pull the tape away from the joint. This should be done sooner when the silicone is still "wet", before it skins over. Then leave it alone to dry.

Good Luck.

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I'm in the middle of a tile project and the CD I got from the tile shop suggests applying the bead of caulk and then spritzing the area with a mist bottle. Then use the finger to tool the caulk. The claim is that the silicone won't stick to something that's wet. I haven't tried it yet so I can't vouch for the process.

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the key to getting a good caulk job with silicone is to cut the tip off to leave a small opening. 1/8 inch or less if you can. You may have to use a small wire to pierce the foil seal inside the top. I keep a t-shirt type rag, not a towel, they leave fuzz, handy. I dip or wet my finger with a sponge and push down fairly hard to leave a small bead on the surface. Some of the silicone will leave a thin film outside the bead. I wrap the rag around my finger once and go over the bead turning the rag each time. That should remove most of the excess caulk. Be sure to move the gun along at a slow pace to fill the crack, leaving as little extra as possible. It's easier to go over it again to fill it than it is to wipe off a bunch of excess caulk.

As for the faucet area. Your original question (duh).

I fill in as much as I can with the gun, usually you can get most of it from each side. You can change the angle of the gun to go around handles, sprayers and such. For the spots that youre unable to get the gun at, I put some on my dry finger tip and go over the crack. Its a litty messier, but the rag on the finger will clean it up nice. Once you get started try to move along the whole wall, to the corner, once silicone starts to set up it will get ripples in it if you run your finger across it.

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If you are going to use silicone, run the bead, no need to go heavy with it. Then spray with a spray bottle, a little soapy water on it. This will keep the silicone from sticking where you don't want it to, as someone else pointed out already. As far as getting behind the faucet, why do you need to use a gun? I use a small tube about the size of a tube of toothpaste. They normally come with a tip that you can cut to get the size bead you want. Latex caulk works well, too. It just doesn't hold up as long. Much easier to use, however. Run the bead, wipe off excess with finger, then use a wet sponge to finish it up. As far as removing old latex caulk, get it damp and it comes off much easier than if it's dry.

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When cutting the tip on the tube of caulk cut it to desired bead size then do the same size perpendicular to the first on each side of the tube. When your done the end will look like a heart and it will fit into the corner alot better and no finger tooling is needed.

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When cutting the tip on the tube of caulk cut it to desired bead size then do the same size perpendicular to the first on each side of the tube. When your done the end will look like a heart and it will fit into the corner alot better and no finger tooling is needed.

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All good suggestions, but by far the very most important part is to get good quality caulking. OSI or Vulkem brand is the only stuff I'd recommend.

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