Jump to content
  • GUESTS

    If you want access to members only forums on HSO, you will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up .

    This box will disappear once you are signed in as a member. 😀

  • RECEIVE THE GIFTS MEMBERS SHARE WITH YOU HERE...THEN...CREATE SOMETHING TO ENCHANT OTHERS THAT YOU WANT TO SHARE

    You know what we all love...

    When you enchant people, you fill them with delight and yourself in return. Have Fun!!!

Sign in to follow this  
jackoh58

ice fishing boots

Recommended Posts

just wanted to see if you folks could get some interesting feedback. What is the best allaround boot? Mickey Mouse? felt-pacs etc. Lets see!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When you mentioned Mickey Mouse you made me think twice about what your question was. But I am asuming you ARE talking about boots for your feet smile.gif

I swear by the lacrosse 800 gram thinsulate rubber boots. 100% waterproof for when your drilling all the holes and splashing water all over yourself. I purchased mine for bow hunting, and now use them for everything. I have yet to get cold feet with them.

My second choice is the Rocky Blizard's... with 1000 gram thinsulate. However, not good for movement as they are almost like a cast. I get cold feet in these more than I do the 800 gram lacrosse rubber boots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mickey mouse boots have my vote!

I was issued my first pair in the USAF, wore them out in England and then bought another pair from Cabelas when I got to Wyoming. They get a lot of laughs here, but in the goose pit or on the ice, guys with thinsulate boots, sorels etc... are complaining of cold feet while my MM boots keep my feet nice and warm. The only problem here is that there is not alot of snow to make for good traction and ice cleats don't fit very well.

Hope that helps! Scott

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Screw in some 1/4 raised head sheet metal screws across the lugs and also on the heals of your Mickeys.

I have had mine rigged that way for 15 years, works great. You will get all the traction you will ever need and no worries about slipping or misplaced cleats.

wink.gif

------------------
Ed "Backwater Eddy" Carlson

Backwater Guiding
"ED on the RED"
[email protected]
><,sUMo,>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, I guess I learned something new today. I thought "mickey mouse" boots were somehting like a kids moon boot or something smile.gif Now I know what you are talking about smile.gif....A friend of mine has those and never complains. I have never tried them though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No complaints here on the mickey mouse boots. I had my for about 6 years now and I love them. I have probably only got cold feet twice in that 6 years and that was b/c it was really cold out and my feet were wet and sweating. (Not a good combo) Only tip is wear the proper socks when wearing these and you will never have cold feet.

------------------
AKA PikeEye 300

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just got a pair of Rocky IceStalkers that have built in, retractable ice cleats in the soles. They are on hinges and flip out nicely, also teflon coated to prevent ice build up. They are a bit cumbersome, but most warm boots are. Rated to -100 degrees and very comfortable, I usually get cold feet myself but not with these babies, keep me nice and warm. They are also water proof.

Fisherdog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LaCrosse Icemans. Or I like to wear if its slushy or alot of hole drilling is my knee high rubber Rocky bowhunting boots. They keep you dry and there warm to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When you guys are talking about the Mickey Mouse boots are you meaning the military issue boots that have an air valve in for flying? I have a pair of ones like that that are white and I've always heard them called bunny boots. I have seen some black ones also. These boots are as warm as any I've come across. Got them at a army surplus store in Alaska but haven't seen them in Minnesota. I actually need a new pair now so where can they be bought?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Arctic Spurs for your Mickeys work great too. They stay put and don't slip.
Ed - I also have the sheetmetal screws in my Mickeys and they work good too. After last season I lost a few in my heel but the ones that I zipped in the front lugs stayed put..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sportsman's Guide has the real extreme cold version White Mickeys in stock. They ran about $80 when I looked 2 days ago.

------------------
Ed "Backwater Eddy" Carlson

Backwater Guiding
"ED on the RED"
[email protected]
><,sUMo,>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love my Rocky Ice-stalkers as well. The retractable cleats allow my to walk in to stores without messing up the floors with ny cleats, but when I step on to the ice a simple flip allows me to have great traction. These are also the warmest boots I have ever had.

------------------
"I'd rather be fishing"

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After hearing how warm they were I bought a pair of the Mickey Mouse boots when I moved to northen MN over 20 years ago . They were warm, but my feet would sweat so much that they were very unconfortable so I junked them and bought LaCross Icemans. I used them for almosts 20 years for fishing, snowmobiling, and other outdoor activites. I always thought they provided excellent ware and warmth. I once bought a pair of Ice Kings, and although they were warm, I thought they were very klunky. Last spring I bought a pair of Rocky Boots, (packs with with the ice cleats), so far I've been very happy with them for being warm and comfortable.

Using a boot dryer after each days use will greatly enhance the warmth and comfort or any boot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most surplus stores in minnesota have "mickey mouse" boots. (Or bunny boots or military issue boots, whatever you want to call them.)

I also put sheet metal screws in mine and that was sweet. I never slipped on the ice. I could run towards the tip-up then stop and not slide 10' past it. grin.gif

------------------
AKA PikeEye 300

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The less your foot is able to move, the more insulation you need. In other words, a flexible foot is a warmer foot. I have two pairs of pac boots (LaCrosse and Irish Setter), and they are warm boots.

They also are heavy boots. But I own a pair of mukluks (I'd say who made them, but the brand is famous, so you likely have heard of them, and it's not an approved link).

They are at least as warm as any pac boots I have ever owned, and, since they are flexible and supple (they feet as comfortable as an old pair of slippers), they keep me just as warm as pac boots with far less weight.

However, when I've got to climb rocks and slide down gravel slopes to get to fishing spots, I prefer the heavy tread of pac boots. But that's the only time. grin.gif

------------------
"Worry less, fish more."
Steve Foss
[email protected]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

If it says LaCrosse you won't go wrong mouse boots are good too.
Though they are a little heavy ( I wear safety toes) I like to think that they are weights working out my legs all winter for the summer look. lol now if they could only help my belly...

------------------
en kala
(I fish)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been wearing Mukluks for over ten years. They are the warmest boot compared to the weight of the other boots on the market. Allthough they are not waterproof, but because of the light weight this can be overlooked.

[This message has been edited by walleye42 (edited 01-02-2004).]

[This message has been edited by walleye42 (edited 01-02-2004).]

[This message has been edited by walleye42 (edited 01-02-2004).]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • Without a doubt......NAP KILLZONE.  Shoot great and really drop the hammer when they connect with a deer.
    • Another win for the icefishinnut  with 323 pts. For win number 3 in the year.😀 2--Fishing_Novice             311 3--Juneau4                         292 4--BlackLundProV             283 5--Rip_Some_Lip               267 6--huckfin                           247 7--mnwildman                   239 8--rl_sd                                208 9--Swiveldigger                  80 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Season totals 1--Fishing_Novice                   7811 2--Juneau4                               7658                   The score in the top three are getting closer and with the ROVEL and Dega --🤔 3--BlackLundProV                   7654 4--huckfin                                 7485 5--icefishinnut                         7398 6--Rip_Some_Lip                     7384 7--mnwildman                         7265 8--Swiveldigger                        6971 9--rl_sd                                      6623   Good luck with the guesses this week. ( except for the  Fishing_Novice!😁 BlackLundProV could back off a Little too.😁   Good Luck in the mess this Week.
    • Sounds like a great trip and a really fun experience, congratulations! Thanks for all the pictures and sharing your story. I know that's a lot of work and it is much appreciated.
    • At this point we had one full day and one morning left to hunt.  No more elk moved into the drainage behind camp.  By some miracle a cow and spike did come back to the hillside we had elk on that first evening, but neither Dad or I could get in position quick enough before they went back over the fence.     All added up we had 2 very good opportunities, and one decent, which by our standards and past experience in general OTC type units was a pretty decent week of elk hunting even though no elk were killed.  We learned a lot about the unit and a potential better way to access the landlocked area behind us via a possible easement logging road, but we have to confirm that with the forest service at a later date.       You might be wondering what happened with our whitetail tags.   We had numerous run-ins with deer on an almost daily basis.  There were at least three occasions where does would feed right into camp, and it got to a point I kept my bow in the cook shack to try to shoot out of it as a blind.  They never stuck around long enough though to actually get a shot off.      Dad sat his tree stand a number of times above camp as he came down at sunset with enough time to sit in a tree for a half hour or so, but the deer always seemed to pass through the spots he could not shoot or see.  One time he climbed down to two deer staring at him from within range, he just did not see them coming...   Almost every evening we walked down the road behind camp we would kick up a deer or two bedding in the quakeys, but as the week progressed they clearly became more skittish of us.  I also tried hunting back down the gravel road and found some good spots where they crossed the road and creek, which if I actually focused on sitting over with a treestand I feel I could have shot a deer, but I wanted an elk more...        Our Elk B tags are good through rifle season, as are the deer tags.  If the stars align and my wife allows I might make a run back out.  I have an acquaintance in the area that I am checking with to see if he might be interested.       I hope Scoot and ArcherySniper come back to report better luck on their hunts.  
    • It rained that night, and the next morning we went up high to glass back where we left the elk.  They seem to have never left the cut we saw them bed in.       Some interesting low clouds.   It rained all afternoon, but the forecast said it would clear a couple hours before sunset.   We observed snow on the high peaks in the distance.        Once the rain stopped and the skies looked clear we went back to see if we could finally shoot an elk.  We worked the wind back up to where we had last sat so we see the elk and still move down to intercept if they came down for water/feed.   The elk were still up high, but shifted left a couple cuts.  We were now close enough to confirm that the bull was in fact a smallish 6 point.       We waited a long time watching the cows get up to feed and then bed down again repeatedly.  As sunset neared the lead cow looked ready to commit to coming down.  Our plan was to run down fast to intercept, watching as we fast-walked down to the bottom.   It was clear now the elk were following the left most ridge, and moving quite fast, they definitely wanted to get to the bottom for the good creek water and green grass!      The plan was I would run ahead to intercept as I could get their faster.  I knew the place they were going, having scouted it earlier in the week.  It was a perfect funnel.  The cows went behind the narrow ridge they were following, but the bull stayed high watching the drainage.  I managed to get up through the saplings quietly and in position, and could see the bull up high, and the cows feeding and walking right to me on a string!      Unfortunately behind me I heard a loud stick break.  The bull did too and was pacing back and forth rapidly trying to figure out what was below him...  I could see my dad standing in the creek bottom.   I adjusted my position, the cows were coming closer, I ranged for shot options, they would pass within 40yd and the bull might walk right over me...    The bull unfortunately had had enough.  He swooped down to the cows and herded them back up the hill...  The cows had no clue what was going on, but the bull clearly was not stupid.   After waiting until it was close to dark I picked my way back down to my dad, who was standing on the cattle trail we had gone up previously.  It turned out that he tripped over a downfall fell badly.   He was not hurt, but he thought the bull could not see him, but I had a better view from above as to what was going on.  Those elk were not seen again for the rest of the hunt.    
    • Unfortunately the weather turned bad on us and it rained over night, I forget if it was day four or five.   In any case a cloud system rolled in and low cloud ceiling filled the drainage behind camp.        We went up the front side of the area hoping elk would be out there to get out of the clouds.  It was extremely windy now as well.  I went high back where I saw the spike days earlier and was glassing back up the drainage when I saw a bull and three cows in the wide open up high!   I considered running down the cut between us to try to intercept in the creek bottom below, but did not want to risk bumping these elk when they were the only elk in the entire drainage!     Dad sidehilled across to join me, followed by a herd of mule deer does...      Selfie with cloud covered hills.        We watched where the elk bedded and decided to ambush them in the evening.  We decided to drive out to town to hit the grocery store so Dad could have more fresh food and not have to resort to eating what I brought.  The cloud system over the area did not look good from below at all...     That evening we went to the hill the elk were on in the morning so we could see where they were bedded.  The clouds were so thick now in the drainage we could not see up to where the elk were.  It was very windy and cold. The elk never showed up.  We left before sunset.     Another selfie in the clouds, so cold and windy I had to break out the facemask and extra layers while hunkering down behind a blowdown.      
    • I told my dad that he should not follow me up that hill, it might kill him.  He did not take me seriously...  He followed anyway.  We left camp very early as it was a long walk up the drainage, and I wanted to be on top before the elk, but I still needed daylight to get up the dangerous last 700ft.     Sunrise behind me on the way up:   I made it to the top and set up in the rock outcropping.  Time passed, Dad was nowhere to be seen behind me.  I saw a group of elk below me in the next drainage, a nice bull and what might have been the cows/calves I was seeing on the spine the previous days...     I waited, and waited, and saw lots of fresh tracks in the dirt.  Dad showed up, still no elk up high...  We waited until about 10am, long past when they had passed through the other times.  The elk below us bedded and a satellite bull moved in on them.  Another bull was bugling to the one below us, and we heard one lone bugle to the right.   We had no intention of going down to try to shoot one, because if we did it would be a nightmare for us to get the meat out again.        We gave up and picked our way back down the chute and all the way to camp.  After doing this walk two days in a row my feet hurt like hell and I was beat.  I would not be able to do it again a third day in a row.     
    • I think it was the third morning when I walked back up the big drainage behind camp to get a good look on the ground for elk sign.  On the way I saw more elk way up on the spine of the drainage.  Lots more elk sign in the back cuts.  It was clear this area held a lot of elk during the summer, but they got busted out by hunters during the early part of the season.    I decided I was going to get a closer look at the potential trail to the top of the drainage spine.  I am a rock climber, so heights don't bother me so much.  I was more concerned about footing and if my dad could get up there, and if I did shoot one how would I get it down...   The top of the spine where I was targeting was 1600ft above camp, the last chute is about 700ft alone and very steep.   I slowly picked my way up the chute, sweating profusely in the sun, but was rewarded at the top.    The view back to camp:   The view down the back side, one square mile of almost entirely private landlocked national forest.       The elk highway along the spine that I was seeing elk use, and was covered in fresh tracks.       The elk trail at the top funnel together at a rock outcropping that I knew I had to use as a blind. If I shot an elk up here it would have to be at the very top, because hauling meat down the hill behind me was bad enough, but I did not want to have to haul any up the hill either as it was just as steep on the other side!   I made plans to come back early the next morning and kill an elk at this spot.   That evening I sat on the other hill we had been hunting more consistently, and watched the herd of elk taunting us from a far off ridge.  Here is one of the small satellite bulls.    
    • Dad had seen a black bear below him that first morning, and when I walked down the next day with him I was able to snap some photos in the early light with my bigger camera.  They are grainy, but it looked like a nice bear to me.  We did not have a tag.     Herd of elk way out on private range land:   Interesting spider:
×