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Ice Fishing Gloves?

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The hardest thing about ice fishing is finding a reliable pair of gloves. I need something that can keep my hands warm and DRY! At the same time I would like to be able to handle fish, tie knots, and feel a light bite. I've tried the wool flip overs (get wet). I've also tried at least seven different pairs of thinsulate gloves, all have at least one major fault. The best thing I've come up with is HT's flip over's with the rubbery palm and the wooly tops. The only problem is the cut off thumb that offers no protection from the elements. What do all of you use, and do they solve my problems?

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I have tried a lots of glove options. Everything from surgical gloves to huge Arctic mitts. What I settled on for convenience and warmth are two sets of gloves. I always carry two sets, or even three at times.

The first is fleece and Gore Tex choppers with a retractable finger opening for the thumb and forefingers. Good for average cold where you leave them on more then off. If you add a Seal Skin glove liner your pretty bulletproof from damp and cold.

The second is Wells Lamont Thinsulate and Gore Tex five finger gloves. Buy them a bit larger then average if you can. They also have big wrist cuffs. I feel the wrist cuffs are impotent because they allow you to remove and reapply the glove quickly. They also seal up the sleeve to glove area well and hold in heat. The Gore Tex and Thinsulate make for a great combo to hold heat and they dry fast after getting damp. They have a leather palm and fingers with Gore Tex backing to wick away moisture. A darn good glove for more or less around $10.

A more spend option is the Cabela's Guide Wear fleece lined glove, very nice, just not cheap. If you go for them get them as large as you can, it adds extra loft and warmth.

The Ol' leather Chopper with wool liners is a tried and true favorite of may, and for good reason. They go a great job of holding heat and allow for good blood circulation. Just that they are not too easy to do anything with is all. They are either on, or off. Still a solid glove system, and I usually keep a set handy.

One glove for all needs is a tough call. Thats why I carry two styles I guess?

I do know it is better to have too many gloves......then not enough!

------------------
Ed "Backwater Eddy" Carlson

Backwater Guiding
"ED on the RED"
[email protected]
><,sUMo,>

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Best gloves that provide warmth and allow you to feel the bite are neoprene gloves.

I don't use them much, though. In my Trap II with a heater, I'm using bare hands.

Outside if I do tip-ups, my hands are in my pockets until I need them for handlining a fish. Then, once I get the tip-up reset, they're back in my pockets to warm up until next time, or they're in a pair of heavy warm chopper mittens.

No glove I've ever seen allow you to both feel the fish/bite/fight and keep your hands warm and dry at the same time. For me, the best options are those listed above. Also, keep those hand warmers in your pockets. There are lots of styles. I have my preference, but that's another thread. grin.gif And I keep a small hand towel along in the Trap. Easier to keep hands warm when you can dry them after landing a fish or grabbing something out of the minnow bucket. grin.gif

------------------
"Worry less, fish more."
Steve Foss
[email protected]

[This message has been edited by stfcatfish (edited 12-10-2003).]

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I use a fingerless pair of wool gloves under a pair of Klondike lined choppers. As Steve Says a hand towel is a must.

[This message has been edited by Northlander (edited 12-10-2003).]

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Check out the Cabelas HSOforum and do a search for Glacier Gloves. I use these during ice fishing, and cold weather flyfishing. They are fleede lined neiprene gloves that have openings and velcro fastener on the backsides of the index finger and thumb so you can tie knots and handle things eality. They are a little spendy, but they are warm and waterproof.

Fisherdog

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Everyone for Glacier Gloves.......

I have a pair from GM that I picked up last year or the year before. They are mitten that folds back to allow my fingers tips to show and move around. The thumb has a slit in the material so it can come out whenever. Thinsulate in the mitt part when I pull it over my finger tips. Sweet gloves.

Use those to pull my fish house around or standing outside.
Bare hands when I'm in the house.

I really don't think there is a TRUE glove out there for the sport of ice fishing. Maybe that should be someones cash cow...inventing gloves for us poor saps!

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I wear a Pair of Cabela Gore Tex Pinnacle gloves they are big but they are very warm. They still let me set up with out having to take them off and water proof. I don't wear them fishing since I am always in a portable or regular shack. For on the ice when I tip up I like the HT rubber gloves with the grey liner. They are rough and allow you to grab fish and hang on good.

------------------
Grip it and Rip it

IFFWalleyes
I Fish For Walleyes
[email protected]

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Fingerless gloves inside a pair of lutsen mitts by granite gear. The mits are spendy but well worth the cost in my opinion. The are lined with fleece (2 liners) that are removeable and dry quickly.

I bought them big for easy access. You can check them out at the granite gear web site.

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I am with Backwater Eddy on this one, Multiple pairs of gloves! I have 2-3 pair along and 1 is neoprene, 1 big pair of choppers for drilling etc, and a spare pair of plain gloves that are dry! never can have too many. (well with in reason!) Also if you are in a house with heat(port or perm) you really shouldn't need too much. (besides a towel)

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My favorite so far is a pair of the cotton gloves dipped in blue rubber(.99 at northern hydraulics.Get the one with the blue band around the top at the wrist)They are cheap and small enough to throw some in a ziploc.I cut the index fingers out and can still tie knots with them on.I top these off with a pair of Joka mittens with a handwarmer in them, if its cold.The Jokas are the warmest and most waterproof mittens I've found so far.Pretty cheap and durable also.I work and play outside every day of the year and have found this to be a pretty good combo.-Icemac

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