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Yellow Dog

Any homemade wind anchor ideas?

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What's your favorite homemade method to keep you from becoming a kite flying across the ice?

This happened to me last year. I got tangled in the tarp and I ended up going for a serious ride. No good.

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What I do is set my house up with the back to the wind and drill two extra holes about 2-3 feet apart not quite through the ice drop a 2x6 and a couple short 2x4s to take up the slop and slide the my portables sled against the posts. The wind will keep the house tight up against the wood.
Then hook your tow rope around the 2x6 in case the wind shifts. When I am done fishing pull the boards and toss them in the sled.

Works well for me !

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I know of people that take a rope and a tree branch, or small peice of 2X4, tie the rope to the wood. Drill a hole outside of the house and stick the wook under neath the ice, then tie the other end of the rope to your shak.

when your done, however, it can be a pain getting the 2X4 or wood out of the ice again. Usually need a spud bar.

klbowe - I like your idea. Which brings to another topic sorta related to this. Which way do people usually face there shak? Back to the wind, front to the wind, side etc???

Klboe

[This message has been edited by korn_fish (edited 12-10-2003).]

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When I'm done punching holes I'll drill a hole halfway through the ice right be hind my portable, then I leave the auger sitting in the hole and tie some rope around the auger to my portable. Not going anywhere.

Or else just tie the gas auger to the portable when you lay it on the ice. That will often times help out too.

Good Fishin,
Matt Johnson

------------------
[email protected]
Catch-N Tackle and Bio Bait
MarCum

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MJ5.....
You might not want to do that, it could lead to a bent auger bit. It's one of the reasons the auger companies suggest laying the auger down on the ice instead of propped up in a halfway augered hole. Even the weight of the powerhead and gravity will bend the auger bit after some time.
I use the ice anchors that screw into the ice, but I also bring a small cordless drill to help with the process.

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Leaving your auger in a 1/2 drilled hole can also result in it becoming frozen in the hole. Water can seep into the hole and freeze solid. I had this happen at Winne about 5 years ago. It took forever to chip it out.

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Animal--I totally agree. You NEVER, under any circumstance want to leave an auger in a half drilled hole. It only leads to problems. Have you ever tried to drill a hole with an auger that has a bent shaft? I have... it sucks.

I set up with my back to the wind. It's the easiest way to stay put. If I can, I set my vehicle crossways (blocking the wind) and set my house up on the other side of the vehile--that's what we did at URL last weekend when there were 30-40 mph winds. Didn't have a problem with any house "flying away"

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Thanks !

Using the auger to partially drill holes and drop 2x6's in works well. just cut the boards long enough so they can be removed or kicked loose on cold nights. Make sure you take them with when you leave it would not be good if a snowmobiler it them.

Using the truck as a wind break works good too. when the ice is thick enough to drive.

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I drilled 2 3/4" holes in the bottom of my fish trap guide and put in 3/4" screws 2 inches long with a large flat washer on each side to protect the plastic. I then drilled a 1/2" hole through the screws. When I get on the ice its easy to screw the ice ancor screws through the holes and the the shelter is solid with no shifting as you go in and out like with the rope anchors...GB

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Last year I took two flying lessons, not good. I was in the shack both times. Any way here is what I did. I first used the wood in the whole trick. While that did work, it sucked trying to get the sticks out when they froze. I now use an old window weight tied to a rope and down a hole. When ready to move, a good yank and the weight breaks the ice and out it comes pretty slick. Be sure to use one on two corners or you will sway from side to side. This year I hope we get a little snow cover to prevent flying.

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I bring my cordless drill with. You can drill a small pilot hole (1/4" bit) in the ice in about two seconds. Then, twist a 4" loop-eye lag bolt ($.30 each) into the pilot hole and tie off on it. You can twist them in with your fingers; longer lags you can stick one bolt through the one you are driving and use it to spin the bolt into the ice. It only takes a few seconds and they are solid.

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Thanks guys, never really thought of it that way. I guess I'll have to use the laying down approach when I anchor my house. Normally I just lay my auger on the ice next to my portable in most conditions but when the wind wips through its nice to have something solid to hold on to. I'll keep that in mind.

Good Fishin,
Matt Johnson

------------------
[email protected]
Catch-N Tackle and Bio Bait
MarCum

[This message has been edited by MJ5 (edited 12-10-2003).]

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I've always wanted to try the hollow tubular ice screws they sell at REI for ice climbing. they have a eye for attachment and I guess they screw right in pretty easy.

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Fleet Farm had a Field N Forest Outdoor Journal they publish. It has all sorts of articles about ice fishing and new products.

One of the new products is from Polar Vision and is called Ice Loks, a portable ice house anchor. It looks like you drill a hole a 3-12 inches in the ice, depending on the thickness of the ice. It is a weighted T shaped spike on a rope that you throw in the hole. The end of the spike has what is similiar to nails out the two or three ends of the spike and they hold in the side of the ice.

Since it is likely made in China, I think one could make something very similar on their own and reduce our national trade deficit. Shape a 1 by 4 into a T about the size of the hole and put some metal spikes out the ends and I think you would have a winner. The spikes grab the side of the ice hole and hold-hopefully. You would need to make two or four if you really wanted to be secure. Hook the spikes to the most secure part of your portable.

[This message has been edited by walleyehawk (edited 12-10-2003).]

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I'm not sure if they're still available but there was a product available called "Ice Anchors". They are basically the idea Roughfisher describes but are self tapping which eliminates the need for a drill. Of course they are also more expensive. I have a set that I paid $6 for years ago and they still work great. I have fished all night in a 1 man portable clam in 20+ mph winds and have never had the house lose touch with the ice. I have the same success in a 2 man as well. I screw them through the floor on the up wind side and 1 in each corner have done the job.

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This was a debated topic last winter also…
I use (2) 3/8” Pole Barn Screws 6” Long (9/16” Head) I put a “Fender Washer” on each of them. I then use my Cordless Drill to drive them in the ice, works great and takes all of 15 –20 Seconds for both. I space them a bit wider then my sled and about 2 feet back. I just use two bungee straps and hook to the sled this way it has some give if need be.
After I am all set up and have my lines in the water I drill a hole on the front and the back of my sled. I drill them as close as possible and auger up some water to somewhat flood the underside of the sled. With in a half hour the sled / runners are froze in. At this point you just reverse your drill and back out the screws and when it is time to move you just pack up and go.
I think it is plain nuts to drill a hole in the bottom of a good sled…


------------------
Hook Em Good!!!!!!!

S.D. Ice Angular;
NRA, DU, NWTF,
Varmint Hunter
& NAHC Life Member

[This message has been edited by S.D. Ice Angular (edited 12-10-2003).]

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I've done the 2x4 in the hole and it works.

Now, if I can ride the wheeler on the ice, I face the wheeler into the wind and keep the Otter connected to the hitch...

------------------
Chells

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I use the ice climbing screws tp picket my dogs to the ice. They are spendy but work extremely well.

------------------
Erik

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I took a piece of threaded rod and bent a hook on one end.Just hammer the rod in the ice and it is very strong. when you want to remove it just hammer it down and hit it on the side. it should pull out easy.

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cut a 12 inch piece of conduit drill a hole in one end tie a 20 foot rope to it. Also take a smaller rope and tie to the center of conduit. Drop conduit down hole holding rope 20 footer and smaller rope on center, pull tight with small rope in center and secure it to shack. untie and conduit will fall down and to retrieve.

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Simple and cheap. OK..Here ya go.

Dig some old barn door style hinges out of a coffee can some place, the diamond shaped bat wing style. Find a hinge that best match's your ice auger size.

You grind the tips of the wings so they bite easily into ice.

Slip a rope through the innermost bolt hole and around the back and out the other side. Tie it off on the long rope side and your all set. An adjustable tie down strap is a good bet too, Same idea as the rope yet you can suck up the slop more easily.

Just drop the hinge into the shallow drilled ice hole and pull, the hinge expands and locks tight. When your done loosen the rope and jab the center of the hinge, it will release. Be sure to leave enough room under the hinge so this is easy to extract. Even if you do wedge one, a jab with the spud bar will kick it out pretty easily.

Bada-Bing...Bada-Boom....Cheap and easy.

I first made these some 25 years ago in NE SD to keep our pick-up style camper ice-houses from blowing away or tipping over in the wind. Those style houses were known to roll in strong winds if not anchored well. Wide on top, narrow on bottom, perfect for rolling in the wind.

------------------
Ed "Backwater Eddy" Carlson

Backwater Guiding
"ED on the RED"
[email protected]
><,sUMo,>

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I guess if what ever you diecide and it doesn't work. Just saw a slot the way the wind is going and at least you can troll while you are riding along. LOL


NF

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Mike Smith,

That's an excellent idea. I'm headed to the garage right now.

Thx,
Paul

[This message has been edited by P Gottshall (edited 12-13-2003).]

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I used my "Mike Smith" shelter anchor for the first time on Lynn lake South Dakota yesterday. Wind can really send you sailing in a hurry out there! Got to say this is the best anchor system I have ever used. Thanks for the idea Mike. smile.gif

Ps last year same lake I used the drill half through the ice technique and froze my auger in. Ended up breaking the blade off trying to get it out! $109.00 later I have a new auger drill on my old Jiffy. DON"T DO THIS!!

------------------
Good Luck & Good Fishing. Lucky

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      The park road will be closed Sept. 19th - 21st due to road construction; there will be no access to the boat ramp. Black Crappie - Fair: Drift fish or troll with a tube jig or small minnow. Yellow Bass - Fair: Drift fish or troll with a small jig. Shore anglers should fish a small piece of crawler or cut bait off the bottom.  Clear Lake
      Surface water temperature is 70 degrees. Channel Catfish - Fair: Use crawlers or cut bait in the areas where water is entering the lake. Black Crappie - Fair: Drift a jig and minnow over deeper submerged vegetation. Yellow Bass - Fair: Drift or troll a small jig tipped with cut bait or a minnow over the reefs until you find fish.  Muskellunge - Fair: Fish the edge of the vegetation and near docks.  Crystal Lake
      Black Crappie - Fair: Drift or troll small tube jigs or a minnow in the dredge cut or on the edge of vegetation. Largemouth Bass - Fair: Use crankbaits.  Lake Smith
      Black Crappie - Fair: Drift or troll a small jig or minnow in deeper near the outlet.  For information on the lakes and rivers in the north central area, contact the Clear Lake Fish and Wildlife office at 641-357-3517.    East Okoboji Lake
      Yellow Bass - Good: Excellent bite continues with good numbers of fish being caught. Cast mini-jigs or hair-jigs or use small baits tipped with wigglers. Don’t overlook the evening bite from docks as these fish will move shallow at dusk. Walleye - Good: Numbers of fish are being caught with traditional baits; good numbers of yellow bass are mixed in with the catch. Northern Pike - Fair: Anglers report northern pike action on the lake.  Five Island Lake
      Channel Catfish - Good: Numbers of fish are being caught trolling. Don’t overlook public areas to fish using traditional "cat" baits which will provide excellent action.  Lake Pahoja
      Bluegill - Good: Recent surveys show good numbers of large angler size fish in the lake.  Little Sioux River (state line to Linn Grove)
      Channel Catfish - Good: Report of angles catching fish from the river.  Lost Island Lake
      Yellow Bass - Good: Reports of yellow bass being caught with black crappie and yellow perch up to 10 inches mixed in the catch. Use small lures such as a twister tail or hair jigs. Bluegill - Good: Recent surveys show numbers of fish approaching 7 inches in the lake. Black Crappie - Good: Recent surveys show numbers of angler acceptable size fish up to 10 inches in the lake.  Ocheyedan Pit #1
      Channel Catfish - Fair: Recent surveys show good numbers of 17 -23 inch channel catfish.  Silver Lake (Dickinson)
      Walleye - Good: Expect the fall walleye bite to start soon. Troll crankbaits during the day; wader fishing is your best chance to catch trophy size fish.  Spirit Lake
      Walleye - Good: The fall walleye bite has started with action improving. Yellow Perch - Good: Good numbers of angler acceptable size yellow perch continue to be caught in the outside line of the weed beds. Bonus bluegill will be mixed in the catch.  West Okoboji Lake
      Bluegill - Good: Rock piles in deeper water with stands of aquatic growth will produce good numbers of angler acceptable sized fish.  For more information throughout the week, contact the Spirit Lake Fish Hatchery at 712-336-1840. 
    • SOUTHEAST IOWA FISHING REPORTS Big Hollow Lake
      The unstable weather isn't helping the fishing or the number of anglers out on the lake.  Black Crappie - No Report: Start looking for crappies in 6 feet of water. Bluegill - No Report: Bluegills should be moving in to more shallow water soon. Start at 6 feet and work your way in from there.  Deep Lakes
      Grab a pole and go exploring at Deep Lakes; there are lots of ponds to try. Largemouth Bass - Fair: Most of the ponds have good numbers of bass in them; most are smaller, but there are some big ones. Go subtle in your choice of lures with the ultra-clear water. Bluegill - Good: Find the right pond and you can catch some nice bluegills.  Iowa River (Columbus Junction to Mississippi River)
      The Iowa River still has a lot of flow right now, but is currently back down in its bank with only some low area flooding; it looks to be headed back up.  Lake Belva Deer
      Water warmed up over the last days to around 78 degrees again. The cooler weather forecast should reverse that trend. Black Crappie - Fair: Last week was pretty slow;  crappie should start biting again with the water getting back to normal and cooling off. Channel Catfish - Fair: Should still be able to pick up a few catfish up by the inlet from the marsh. Largemouth Bass - Fair: Picking up a few bass in the more shallow water up along the rocks and gravel bottom areas.  Lake Darling
      The water temperature is back up to about 79 degrees. Water clarity is improving despite more heavy rains earlier this week. Fishing, while still pretty good, is a little more hit and miss due to the weather.  Bluegill - Good: Decent numbers of hand-sized bluegills are being caught in 5 or less feet of water. Water still hasn’t cleared up after last week’s heavy rains. So a little flash to any lure is a good idea. Channel Catfish - Good: Anglers continue to catch catfish. It’s a good time to fish the weirs in the in-lake silt dams as the water from the recent and forecast rains come into the lake. Largemouth Bass - Good: Bass are hovering over the rock piles in about 5-8 feet of water. Spinnerbaits and spoons work best.  Lost Grove Lake
      Water temperature was 78 degrees on Wednesday; the storm may have cooled it off more since then. Black Crappie - Fair: Anglers are still catching crappies out deep, but if the nights stay fairly cool, they should start to move in to shallower water. Largemouth Bass - Good: Run your favorite crankbait on the north side of the lake, out along the mounds on the flats and in shallow.  Skunk River (Coppock to Mississippi River)
      The Skunk River is back down to about 1/2 bank full. The parking areas and lanes to them are still muddy.  For more information on the above lakes and rivers, call the Lake Darling Fisheries Office at 319-694-2430. Central Park Lake
      The lake is close to full after the renovation project; fingerling fish have been stocked.  Coralville Reservoir
      The lake level is at 705 feet (normal pool is 683.4 feet) and slowly falling as of 9/20. All public ramps are under water and the Mehaffey ramp is closed due to construction.  Diamond Lake
      The water is muddy. Black Crappie - Fair: Try small jigs fished over deeper brush. Most fish are 8-9 inches. Channel Catfish - Good: Stink bait works best. Some limits are being reported.   Iowa Lake (Iowa County)
      Largemouth Bass – Slow. Channel Catfish – Slow. Bluegill – Fair. Black Crappie - Fair: Fish in 12-15 feet of water and look for fish suspended a few feet off the bottom.  Iowa River (Coralville Lake to River Junction)
      Catfish were biting at Hills and River Junction before the flows bumped up to 10,000 CFS. Flows will continue to be this high until the Coralville Reservoir is back down to normal, which could be weeks.  Kent Park Lake
      The lake is currently drained for a lake restoration project.  Lake Macbride
      The motor restriction is off; any sized motor may be used at no-wake speed (5 mph). Black Crappie - Fair: Use jigs or minnows around brush; some fish are reported as moving shallower. Walleye - Fair: Troll crawlers or crankbaits in 7-14 feet of water. Largemouth Bass - Fair. Wiper (Hybrid Striped Bass) – Fair: Try topwater baits early and late then troll during the day. Channel Catfish - Fair: Try cut bait or stink bait. Evenings are best.  Pleasant Creek Lake
      The lake is still 1.5 feet low. Use caution on the lake, as many of the new rock and wood structures are becoming submerged. There are 2 docks in at the main ramp and the fish cleaning station is open.   For more information, contact the Lake Macbride Fisheries Station at 319-624-3615.   Lake Keomah
      Bluegill - Fair: Use small jigs tipped with live bait near shore and around the fishing jetties. Black Crappie - Fair: Use a jig tipped with a minnow around deep structure. Try different depths until you find active fish. Channel Catfish - Fair: Use stink bait or chicken liver in 4-8 feet of water. Largemouth Bass - Fair: Try spinnerbaits, crankbaits or rubber worms around the fishing jetties and along the dam.  Lake Miami
      Largemouth Bass - Fair: Try topwater lures in the early mornings and evenings then switch to rubber worms or crankbaits during the hotter parts of the day. Target the cedar tree piles and the fishing jetties. Bluegill - Fair: Use a chunk of night crawler along the fishing jetties or around the cedar tree piles.  Lake Sugema
      The south boat ramp off of Highway 2 has been reopened. There is now a construction project on the north ramp. Largemouth Bass - Fair: Use topwater lures in the early mornings and evenings. As the day progresses, target deeper structure using rubber worms or deep diving crankbaits. Black Crappie - Slow: Crappies are suspended. Try drifting minnows around the flooded timber at different depths to find active fish. Bluegill - Fair: Try live bait tipped on a small jig around the shorelines and fishing jetties. Keep moving until you find active fish.  Lake Wapello
      Channel Catfish - Fair: Use chicken liver or stink bait. Don’t fish too deep as the lake does stratify; target 6-8 feet of water. Largemouth Bass - Good: Use rubber worms or crawdad imitating crankbaits around deep structure. Try also topwater lures around the cedar tree piles in the morning. Bluegill - Fair: Try small jigs tipped with a chunk of night crawler around aquatic vegetation. Black Crappie - Slow: Try jigs tipped with a minnow in 6-10 feet of water.  Rathbun Reservoir
      The current lake level is 906.10 msl. Normal operating elevation is 904.0 msl. Lake Rathbun has zebra mussels, so make sure to properly drain, clean, and dry equipment before transporting to another water body. Channel Catfish - Good: Use stink bait or chicken liver in coves or areas with some water running into the lake. White Crappie - Fair: Try minnows around deeper structure. Trolling small crankbaits can also catch suspended crappies. Crappies will start to move shallow as the water cools. Wiper (Hybrid Striped Bass) - Fair: Troll crankbaits along rocky shorelines and around rock piles. Follow the gulls as they will be where the schools of hybrid striped bass are feeding. Try also vertically jigging spoon baits around rock piles. Walleye - Fair: Use night crawler rigs or troll crankbaits around rock piles and submerged points.  Red Haw Lake
      Largemouth Bass - Good: Cast the shorelines in the early part of the day and then fish deeper structure as the day warms up. Use rubber worms or crankbaits. Topwater lures can be productive along the lily pads. Black Crappie - Fair: Try tube jigs along the shorelines. Bluegill - Fair: Use small jigs tipped with live bait around the shorelines and fishing jetties. Channel Catfish - Fair: Try night crawlers or chicken liver around the fishing jetties and the outer edge of the lily pads.  The district includes Mahaska, Lucas, Wayne, Monroe, Appanoose, Wapello, Davis and Van Buren counties. Contact the Rathbun Fish Hatchery at 641-647-2406 with questions about fishing in south central Iowa.   MISSISSIPPI RIVER  FISHING REPORTS Mississippi River Pool 16
      Tailwater stage is 10.36 feet at Lock and Dam 15 in the Quad Cities, but is forecast to reach 12.5 feet by the middle of next week. Flood stage is 15 feet. As of Sept. 19th, the Clark's Ferry boat ramp was still closed due to high water, but the ramp at Shady creek is open. The docks have been pulled out at the Fairport Recreational area due to high water. Fishing has been slow.  Mississippi River Pool 17
      Tailwater stage is 10.31 feet at Lock and Dam 16 in Muscatine and is forecast to rise over the weekend. Flood stage at Lock and Dam 16 is 15 feet. River stage at Muscatine is 12.14 feet, but forecast to reach 13.2 feet by the middle of next week. Flood stage at Muscatine is 16 feet. The Kilpeck Landing is closed. Big Timber is also closed due to high water. Fishing has been slow.   Mississippi River Pool 18
      Tailwater stage is 12.57 feet at Lock and Dam 17 above New Boston and has been falling the past week, but is forecast to rise over the weekend. Flood stage is 15 feet at Lock and Dam 17. River level at Keithsburg is 12.52 feet and is forecast to reach 13.1 feet by the middle of next. Flood stage at Keithsburg is 14 feet. The Toolsboro access is inaccessible due to the Odessa road being flooded. Ferry Landing is closed. Fishing has been slow.   Mississippi River Pool 19
      Tailwater stage is 9.43 feet at Lock and Dam 18 and is forecast to start rising over the weekend. Flood stage is 10 feet. River level at Burlington is 14.63 feet and is forecast to start rising over the weekend. Flood stage at Burlington is 15 feet. Fishing has been slow with the high water.   River stages have been falling the past few days. With recent heavy rains, the river is forecast to start rising over the weekend. Some boat ramps are closed due to high water. Main channel water temperature is around 73 degrees. Water clarity is poor due to high water conditions. Fishing has been slow with the high water. If you have questions on fishing Pools 16-19, contact the Fairport Fish Hatchery at 563-263-5062.
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