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gilliweed

how much ice does it take?

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Bigguns,

Thanks, you're right, I don't want to loose that house. What about if I do haul it out with a wheeler, the wheeler, and a 1900 lb. house, how much ice do you think would be safe?

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The DNR guidelines they post on there HSOforum is

3"-4" to walk
6"-8" for houses and ATV's or snowmobiles
12"-14" to drive trucks, cars

For a big rig I think I would wait for the 12-14 range. That is a lot of money you are putting out on the ice

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when the other guys are all pulling thiers out and not falling through. When it comes to my truck or wheeler and a ice house I always wait till theres at least a few dare-devils that ventured out 1st and made it back in fine; but thats just me.

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I've got an 8x12' I push out every year. I've done it myself, and many times with a few buds. When we built it, we formed well pipe runners under it and it glides easily on ice or even in 2-3 inches of powdered snow. A pair of crampons and a pry bar are the tools we use. Get the house moving with the pry bar and start pushing!

I know I'm going to come off sounding like a real moron here, but I've been out on as little as 4" of ice with it. I can be a little unnearving. The important part of my design is that the weight is spread over the 2 runners for the entire 12' length of the house. I would never try it with a wheeled unit and I ALWAYS drill my route. I stop at first (within chaining distance) to listen for the cracking to stop, watch for water coming up the holes, etc. If ice can support a house without water coming up the holes, to me it's safe.

I have had a few 'talkings to' by a few marinas and I had one bait shop try to sell me 30' of rope and a Hilex jug :-0 over the 12 seasons that I've done this.

As I've gotten older, and my level of pi## and vinegar has dropped a notch, I now usually wait for 5-6". I have never, not once, had a problem. The real problem is that you have to be able to react very quickly if need be. If you're on 4-5" of ice and we get a 50 degree day, you better get out there and get it next up on shore. Particularly if you have a radiation magnet (dark colored house) and/or it's windy. My house is white and melts little ice when the sun comes out...irregarless, ice get's soft with direct sunlight. I have had to push back to shore on a few warm occassions.

Crazy, probably even stupid? I guess maybe. I get some **** good fishing before the vehicles are out, and I can lay down on one of my bunks with a good hunting/fishing mag while everyone else sits in their uncomfortable portables and on buckets while I listen for a visit from Walter.

My opinion on recommended ice depths is that they have a stupidity factor. If the DNR recommended 5" of ice for a perm house there would be all sorts of idiots out on it and the first 50 deg. day that came along would put half them in the drink. If the DNR recommends 10-12" (just an ex.) A week at 50 degrees wouldn't likely make a dent, especially since we generally have snow cover (reflector) by the time we get 10-12". Finally, there is a very big difference between 5" of good ice and 5" of shoddy ice.

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That's a good question!! I don't think there is a right answer or a wrong answer to how much ice is enough ice.

I have been going out on early ice for about 30 years. We have 2 houses, one 1,900 pounds and one 3,300 pounds. We use the lighter one with a 4 wheeler and go out on 6" of ice, BUT I drill about 50 holes (walking)and measure each hole to make sure there is no variation in the ice especially if there is snow on the ice. I also drill the holes in the snow where there is less ice and then I try to drive the 4 wheeler pulling the fish house on the ice with no snow if possible.

If there is a crack (wider than an inch or two) I will bridge it before I cross it.

Early ice is the best but be careful... I worry about the nuts that follow me as much as for myself because I pretty much know what is out there before I venture out with the house. Some people just follow you and don't realize I may have bridged a crack and pulled the bridge after crossing!!!

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Help! In past years I simply had a collapsable, and figured 4" of clear ice, 5" if it is full of snow. Now I have a perminent on wheels, 7' X 12', and it weighs 1900 lbs with no-one in it. How much ice does it take to be safe for a rig like that?
How about with 600 lbs. of people in it?
Thanks for your help guys.

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What you need to be concerned about how much is on the ice to get that rig out there. If you don't have a wheeler or snowmobile you'll be waiting FOR AT LEAST 10-11 INCHES Thats considered semi safe. (i don't practice what I preach. Be careful to distiguish between good and bad ice. Go out check before you hook the rig up and head out. Think about how much you spent on that condo on wheels and it might change your mind about being antsy to be the first one on the ice.......Even though it does give you is somekind of strange sense of satisfaction. Be safe.....I don't need you taking valuable space in the newspaper wink.gif

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