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glenn57

water quality question

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would like some thoughts. i speared a lake the first and second weekends of dec. and the water was good to see in, then on new years weekend it got relly dirty. you would have to swish your spear around, itwould clear up for a bit then you could not see bottom again. other years it would have cleared up really good. not this year, it was as dirty as ever. does anyone have any thoughts on why this happens. i have heard from other spearers this is real common all over this year. look forward to hearing your thoughts.

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I hear ya your saying. I have talked to alot of people about this as well.

I feel that it had to do with alot of the way that the weather was when the ice froze. Reason that i say that is, alot of the lakes that i was around waiting for the ice to start, the lakes that had ice on them, took a very long time for these lakes to freeze over.

With the lake turnovers during the wintertime, i believe that lot of them turned over lake, becuase of the ice, or might not have ever turned over at all. The problem that i have seen, is that the bigger the lake that i have been on, the dirty the water is.

If i was out on a smaller lake, the water is clear that i can spear in 20 feet of water. The reason that they are clear, is becuase they had froze over fast.

Maybe im wrong, i dont know, i just think this is why they are not like they usta be, cuase they never really froze, and the water never got to clear up in the time.

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bassnspear, the first 2weekends in dec the water was nice an clear, and we had 7inches ice the first weekend so a cant believe the weather was a factor. its frustrating. our lake is a small lake.

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I understand what your saying. I went out to a lake few weeks ago, and it was always clear, and when out and the lake was dirty as can be. Im talking with the DNR right now, i will get back to you about this subject.

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Just a shot in the dark,

It sounds like your lake is getting depleted of oxagen. After turnover, the warmer water lower in the water column is getting colder and more dense. Then I believe that there can be inverse stratification which can cause the water to become cloudy. But really, I am not sure what causes the cloudy water later in the year, but I am curious as to what the DNR has to say.

Just a guess,

John

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Possibly some type of an algae bloom. I have heard of diatoms having blooms under the ice, and they would probably cause a brownish color.

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I did contact the DNR, however, they sent me a email back, and gave me a address to send it to the right person for the questions. Should hear back soon.

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i dont think the lake is low on oxegen,it was dirty new years alraedy id think the fish would be dead by now. besides the fish i did see where quite fiesty yet. i heard it could be the lack of snow is allowing more sunlite, therefore more algea growth. cant wait to see what the dnr says.

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Here is what the DNR sent me back on the email!!!!!!!

Without knowing location, depth and level of fertility it is difficult to say with certainty what factors have resulted in increased turbidity in your lake. It is very likely a result of a late winter bloom of phytoplankton (algae). The more phosphorus from developed shoreline, agricultural runoff, and septic tank leaching the greater the chance of noticeable bloom.

Many fertile lakes will have higher turbidity after early winter freeze-up, before shorter day length and snow cover reduce available sunlight for algae to grow - and then gradually clear through the winter with shortening periods light and increasing snow cover. As days again get longer in late winter, and if snow cover compresses or melts, light passes into the water column and can cause sudden increases in population levels of algae. Very shallow lakes with potential winterkill from low dissolved oxygen can release phosphorus from the bottom sediments, as a result of low dissolved oxygen, and stimulate more intense algal blooms more quickly than deeper and less fertile lakes. A take away message is keep shorelines in natural vegetation to prevent runoff from reaching our lakes.

I attached an MPCA HSOforum that has lots of stuff for looking at lake information.

http://www.pca.state.mn.us/water/lake-faq.html

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