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daydreamer

Wolves attack Moose

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Here are some photos that got emailed to me. Anyone else seen these? Pretty self explanatory. Amazing what they are capable of. Keep in mind this was a moose and not a deer. Apparently these were taken from a treestand but I don't know any other details. Hope this works

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2007-2/1245407/Moose-1.jpg

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2007-2/1245407/Moose-2.jpg

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2007-2/1245407/Moose-3.jpg

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2007-2/1245407/Moose-4.jpg

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they were taken by plane. Pretty amazing what a few wolves can do to a large animal like a moose. I think the snow really hinders the moose's ability.

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While in Alaska, Denali National Park, we watched two wolves stalking and harrasing a large Bull Moose. This probably went one for about 15 minutes. It was not until the moose charged the wolves did they scatter and not return. Of course this was in July and there was no snow and only two wolves not an entire pack.

It is amazing what nature is capable of. To bad for the Moose but still interesting to see.

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when are they going to open a season on them things. i have heard there are way more wolves aroud in northern mn and wi that the dnr is telling everybody. My boss has a cabin in northern wi he says he sees them every weekend

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I suspect having the plane circling this attack helped the wolves more than it helped the moose. blush.gif

The pilot and wolves should be arrested and prosecuted for using an airplane to kill a moose. cool.gif

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"when are they going to open a season on them things"

Makes you think of a banjo and deliverance doesn’t it?

blush.gif

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Guys, this is mother nature, it happens every day, that's how they eat, they don't use Cub Foods. It's been going on for millions of years.

It's the journalist that makes it a sensational issue, but very interesting to observe.

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The moose must have been sick or very weak. It is very unlikely that wolves will take down a large healthy adult moose. As for opening a season on wolves, we are just getting them back to a stable population. There will be no season for years.

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when I wander through northern Minnesota the comment I hear all the time is - when was the wolf season ever closed?

No problem with wolves eating big game - I eat it too.

When the moose is turned back into the pack via airplane - I have issue ...

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Actually in deep snow conditions, the scales favor the wolf, particularly with large critters like moose. They just can not escape the deep snow and save enough energy to be able to fight them off! Big snow is good for the wolf and bad for the moose. Same thing happens here in MN but we have just been lucky with very easy Winters! This goes on in our back yards with moose, deer, and anything else that looks edible to wolf pack...yotes to!

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Quote:

i have heard there are way more wolves aroud in northern mn and wi that the dnr is telling everybody.


Who did you hear this from? And what was their conspiracy theory on why the dnr wants to report lower numbers than there are?

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The UP of Michigan is becoming a wolf haven. Last month a doe was run down by 2 wolves IN town, in the middle of the day.....right through the gas station parking lot. One member of a camp next to ours had a wolf cruise by his stand on opening morning this year. They have been around for a long time and we will see a season soon whether it is trapping or hunting. Great pics by the way!

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I know the pr stuff says that 'wolves thin the old, weak and sick out of game herds and populations' but as a resort owner up in canada told me a couple years back "that's Bull, five adult wolves eat whatever the heck five adult wolves want to eat!".

Get on Google, select the video tab to refine your search to only vids and search for wolf attacks/kills etc. Been a while but I know there are some pretty crazy vids online. Specifically remember a mt lion attack on a cow elk that was extremely sobering when you hunt the rocky's in prime cat turf. crazy.gif (you'd get about .5 seconds to wet yourself) shocked.gif

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Whoa whoa whoa, you mean to tell me that Disney movie "Never Cry Wolf" about culling isn't all fact??? grin.gif I remember our Biology teacher showed us that flick 3 years in a row.

Predators don't sit around waiting for a sick cow or an off-season calf or a near dead bull to eat even when they are hungry? Get outta here!

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I think there are alot of people who need to wake up and smell the coffee. Wolves eat what they want, when they want. Thats what it means to be the top of the food chain. If your hungry you don't wait for the sick or weak. You kill and eat the first thing that comes along. It isn't walt disney out there folks. When there is a season on the wolf I will be one of the first in line to get a tag, but until then I will watch and admire them. But I will never lie to myself and think that we should have alot more of them around.

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We don't have to go too far to see this, I have a friend that has coyotes killing adult deer, same scenario and he has camera footage shocked.gif

He lives in Webster, which is south metro....

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amoebus,

Why would the DNR report lower numbers than there actually are, you ask. Several reasons. 1) Federal funding: If the wolf population has been determined to be stable do you think the Feds will continue to finance, at least at its current level, the same amount of studies as it currently does? NO-WAY! 2) Not all studies are being done by the DNR or Department of Agriculture. Grants are being given to independant biologists for studying the wolves. Do you think they want to lose their money too? NO-WAY! 3) The studies themselves are simply inaccurate. 4) Environmentalists......The DNR does not want to deal with what these people will do if we delist these animals.

I could go on and on with hundreds of reasons. But first and foremost it comes down to federal funding. Don't get me wrong, I have nothing against these animals. They are relatives of our cheerished hunting dogs, but the fact remains, there are way more wolves around now than there were a few years back. I live on the Iron Range and have my whole life. You can argue with me until your face turns blue, but the fact remains that wolves are getting out of hand as far as their population is concerned.

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