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eyepatrol

Knaus Not Alone Anymore!

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Wow!

Quote:

Kenny Francis, crew chief for driver Kasey Kahne, and Robbie Reiser, crew chief for Matt Kenseth, whose teams failed post-qualifying inspection Sunday for the Daytona 500, have been ejected from Daytona International Speedway and will receive multiple-week suspensions, according to a report from The Charlotte Observer.

The crew chiefs will not be allowed to participate in any further Speedweeks activities, the report said. They will also be suspended several additional races, as well as receive monetary fines. The teams will likely receive points penalties as well, sources told The Observer.

NASCAR Chairman Brian France promised harsh penalties for cheating teams from qualifying Sunday.

The biggest penalty might not be announced today because NASCAR officials are still checking the intake manifold confiscated from the Toyota of owner/driver Michael Waltrip.

"It's our job is to escalate penalties — you're going to see it today," France said. "It will be undeniable that when you keep pushing the system and test the integrity of the sport, we will do whatever it takes.

"That doesn't mean you go out and get somebody in the electric chair. But that does mean that you step up the penalties to a level that makes it a true deterrent."

Both the No. 9 Evernham Motorsports Dodge of Kahne and the No. 17 Roush Racing Ford of Kenseth had unapproved aerodynamic adjustments, where holes that were supposed to be covered were not, NASCAR officials said Sunday.

France said afterward that repeat offenders could have entire teams ejected.

"We are going to get tough with the competitors when they push the credibility of the sport," France said.

"But you have to have the punishments fit the crime. We can't get just completely silly about it. We have to be tough, firm and clear, and we're going to do that today."

It is the second consecutive year that NASCAR has had cheating infractions during qualifying for the Daytona 500.

"You can't expect that [with the] 120 cars and the hundreds of thousands of rules that are out there, that some teams [aren]'t either going to intentionally cross the line or inadvertently cross the line," France said. "It's our job to protect the integrity of the sport."


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Its time to start handing out some stiffer penalities. LOkks like that just might happen. Its going to wake up the good ole boys club.

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I think this action and Fance's comments will certainly get the attention of the crew chiefs from here on out. That's one heck of a wakeup call! The 55 isn't out of the bushes yet either.

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Update!

Quote:

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - Oh, the games people play.

After president Brian France promised earlier on Tuesday that NASCAR would "step up the penalties to a level that makes a true deterrent" to its race teams, the sanctioning body put the hammer down on four crew chiefs Tuesday.

Robbie Reiser and Kenny Francis were issued four-week suspensions and $50,000 fines for illegal aerodynamic alterations made to the Nos. 17 and 9 before qualifying for the Daytona 500. There were also 50-point penalties for drivers Matt Kenseth and Kasey Kahne and 50-owner-point penalties issued to Roush Racing and Evernham Motorsports. The penalties issued to the teams are unprecendented.

A two-race suspension and $25,000 fine were handed to Josh Browne, crew chief for No. 19 Elliott Sadler, and Rodney Childers, crew chief for Scott Riggs' No. 10 car. Their teams were penalized 25 driver and owner points as well.

"It's obvious that we've ramped up our penalties and we're going to get people's attention," said NASCAR vice president of competition.

Kahne's Evernham Motorsports Dodge and Kenseth's No. 17 Roush Racing Ford had holes that were supposed to be covered were not, NASCAR officials said Sunday, affecting the aerodynamics of the cars. The holes were found during post-qualifying inspections.

The suspensions to the Nos. 19 and 10 cars were due to unapproved modifications to the decklid. The No. 19 car is owned by Evernham Motorsports and the No. 10 is co-owned by Evernham and James Rocco. The violations by the No. 10 and No. 19 teams were found prior to qualifying.

"We regret that this situation has occurred, and apologize to out partners, teams members, fans and NASCAR," Ray Evernham said in a press release. "Once we conduct a thorough review of NASCAR's findings we will determine the proper action to take. We did not intend to infringe on the rules and will research this matter to ensure it does not occur again."

None of the crew chiefs were ejected. All four chiefs have the right to appeal the fines within 10 days, but a hearing would have to be held and the crew chiefs would have to win the appeal.

This is the first time teams have entered the Daytona 500 with negative points in the standings.

At this time, Evernham has no crew chiefs in place for Sunday's race.

As far as Michael Waltrip and the No. 55 car are concerned, NASCAR vice president of communications Jim Hunter said lab results were not back and he "did not want to speculate" on what if any implications of any penalties for Waltrip. The the intake manifold was confiscated from the Waltrip's Toyota after Sunday's qualifying.

As long as there has been racing, there have been teams trying to get an advantage. In the last year alone, Jimmie Johnson crew chief Chad Knaus was fined $25,000 and suspended from competition for unapproved aerodynamic modifications. Chris Andrews was fined $35,000 for the No. 19 car being to low at Charlotte and docked 25-points for driver Jeremy Mayfield and owner Ray Evernham. Slugger Labbe was fined $25,000 and suspended four races for an illegal sway bar on the No. 88 of Dale Jarrett at Richmond in May. Jarrett and owner Robert Yates were penalized 25 points. Philippe Lopez' illegal carburetor at Daytona cost the chief $25,000 and 25 points for driver Terry Labonte and owner Bill Saunders.

The largest fine ever assessed by NASCAR was a $60,000 penalty given to Ray Evernham in Charlotte in May 1995 for "use of parts that did not conform to NASCAR license."

The most owner points ever docked from a team was 151 from Michael Kranefuss and the No. 12 at Talladega in May 2000 for use of fuel by a competitor that does not meet NASCAR specifications. Kranefuss also, received a $50,000 fine.

During a press conference Tuesday, France insisted, "it's our job to protect the integrity of the sport." But on the flip side of the coin, France said NASCAR is under-covered.

That wasn't the case Tuesday. The front page on the Daytona Beach News-Journal featured a story about three Nextel Cup teams under investigation for alleged improprieties. The cover pages on MSN.com and AOL.com also had prominent displays of teams working outside the boundaries. While it was not the kind of coverage that NASCAR was looking attract, it was coverage nonetheless.

France was adamant that NASCAR had an "ongoing concern, initiative and emphasis on leveling the playing field" and honestly, teams would embrace that concept. But until NASCAR hires an engineering workforce that's equal to the teams, that's not likely to happen.


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The 55's situation is a little different from what I understand. What would you put in your manifold that would give you an advantage???

Anyone have any guesses?

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I would have to agree with Jack Roush's statement regarding habitual offenders and the level of penalty.....i.e. "past practice".

Since there isn't any official "written in stone" NASCAR guidelines that say if you do this, you'll be penalized that, I would have to assume that NASCAR just upped the ante on offences and isn't following past practice. If they did bump up the penalties based on the level of infraction, then Knaus probably wouldn't be allowed at a NASCAR track for life considering what he's been caught doing if he got caught now. That could be said for Harvick's crew chief as well.....habitual offenders.

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NASCAR pretty much dictates how the plenum design and port configuration is to be on the restictor plate engines. They do allow a min and max dimension on these to give the engine guys something to work with to try to induce more air into the engine and keep the fuel mixed.

Example of one design was a few years ago someone designed the spacer plate to move up and down inside the plenum to make the engine "think" it was pulling more air into it.

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They have put things like Sterno in the intakes in the past. As we all know, Sterno burns, and it carries it's own oxygen so when applied below the restricter plate you have introduced an artificial source of oxygen into the system, therefor negating the restricter plate somewhat. From what I have read it dosen't last long but it works for a few extra ponies, and that's all it takes.

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Quote:

They have put things like Sterno in the intakes in the past. As we all know, Sterno burns, and it carries it's own oxygen so when applied below the restricter plate you have introduced an artificial source of oxygen into the system, therefor negating the restricter plate somewhat. From what I have read it dosen't last long but it works for a few extra ponies, and that's all it takes.


Especially effective for qualifying where they are only making a short run anyway...

By the way, they were talking on the radio last night to Robbie Gordon and he said, "well its only rumors around the garage of course, but it sounds like Mikey's punishment will be harsher than all these combined." YIKES.

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I am glad they are starting to take points away since money isn't going to be a deterent.

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oh ya, that was the other thing R. Gordon said. "when you start to get up to the $50K range its about where we feel it, but every team has a fine budget built in for the year, that's just the way we have to operate."

So yes I agree, the money isn't a big deal to these teams.

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I am sure that a large enough fine would hurt, but if you hit them hard enough in the points, they will really feel that. Some of the bigger teams and afford the fine and not be hurt too bad, but the points you cannot recover.

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Quote:

every team has a fine budget


Unless NASCAR were to exceed that fine budget. wink.gif

Points is probably what hits home more though.

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I thought I read that Mikey did get his car back for practice and for the 125's tomorrow. If they can determine that it was sterno or something else to aid performance, it will be interesting to see if he even gets to race tomorrow or Sunday. blush.gif

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Let's just wait and see...

We'll see how "stiff" those penalties are when unibrow or shrub gets hit... You can look at the past and have a good idea for the most part...

Steve

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I believe that any driver or team no matter who they are, are going to get equal penalties from this point on. They cannot afford to pick and choose. Whether it be Jr, Gordon or any Rousch car, they will all pay the piper.

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I beleive if there are going to take points they will need to have some sort of system to it like a fuel cell infractions is five points.

But with everything that is going on how are they going to do that. A team out of the top 35 in owners points may be willing to take the chance with something they think will give them a advatage over the others fighting for that 35th spot.

IMO the money thing has'nt been enough to really hurt anyone and if what R. Gordon said is ture about a fine budget it really has not impact on the people that are pushing the rules.

Sifty

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What would you guys think about this for a penalty, if the team gets caught cheating 2 or 3 times in the year they are banned from the chase for the cup at the end of the year no matter how many points they have?

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Pretty severe penalty for a couple of first time offenders. (#17 and #9)

If NASCAR wants to "step up the penalties to a level that makes it a true deterrent."

That's fine.

I just hope all have to play by the same rules.

Judging by the penalties metted out to the #10 and #19, as well as the yet to be

announced, punshiment of #55, NASCAR still has their wishy-washy "levels of severity". (He only cheated a little bit)

Cheatin is cheatin. The punishment should be same for all.

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The other thing they could do if they want to be serious is tell them to have a nice weekend and not let them race if they get busted for cheating.

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I don't think they would do that with the dollars that the sponcors but into each car.

If they are putting 10 to 15 millon dollars in as the main sponcor there is no way Nascar is going to have in on a hauler and heading home.

As I'm typing this was Robby Gordon the last driver that got sat down for a race?

Sifty

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I thought Harvick when he was not allowed to race Martinsville. I don't remember Robbie having to sit one out...

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Not hardly UncleBill, Kenseth #17 and #9 had the intent and actually built duct work to circumvent "CHEAT" the rules.

The #10 and #19 drilled out a meaningless little screw on the back of the ride which is a little nit picky if you ask me, I hope they appeal and win.

But Kenseth and #9 were caught CHEATING red handed after qualifying.

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I would agree that the 17 & 9 went well past the rules. I dont believe this was pushing the limits but breaking the rules totally.

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