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Morel hunting

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I dont know of any spots are Hibbing. I saw this post and got excited just thinking about the greys and yellows. It will be a few months before we can start to pick those tasty morsels again. Um, fresh morels. smile.gifsmile.gifsmile.gif

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aw great! it was bad enough that i was playing with my open water rods , and eye balling my golf clubs. now he brings up morels too! grin.gifi am of no help as far as a location, but if you get up that way this winter,now is a good time to take some field glasses and do some scouting for dieing elms.

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i have been thiniking about them too! I'm going to be in the Hibbing area the last week of may, so hopefully there'll be a few left, I'm just hoping to get some ideas as where to go, this will probably be a onetime visit, so i'd love to get a few!

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What works for me around south central Mn is to look around dieing elms with the bark about 1/3 off. It also helps if there is buckthorn about the area. South facing slopes with the elms are also very good. Looking after a good rain is usually a good time as they do need damp ground.

I usually start to find the little greys around the time the Lilacs start to blossom. The nicer yellows follow very closley behind.

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will you guys knock this off! frown.gif spring seems like for ever away); you have to keep bring morels up!!!!

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No kidding. Although, it sure is fun to think about it! Shed hunting first though...morels a few weeks later. Keep perspective fellas! Just a quick poll though, taste wise, what do you prefer, greys or yellows? Personally, I like the taste of the greys better but I like the texture of the yellows. Toss up for me I guess!

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Greys are probably my favorite too, though I love those yellows, can't wait for this years pickings, saw a good looking recipe for mushrooms with turtle soup, looking forward to testing it out!!

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Grey's are maybe little better. Both great! I am saving some of my venison backstraps to top with some Morels. yummmmm

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I'm not an expert but heres what I know. Once you find a patch of mushrooms you can bet there'll be mushrooms in the same place next year. For that reason you tell no one where your patch is or else they'll be gone. Its not like fish that can be taken off a hump and in a little while have fish move back in.

Like whats been said dead elms with bark peeling off. Those are easy to spot as you go through woods looking. Dead logs have a few, I'd imagine when the trees were dead but still standing it was a good spot.

Old apple orchards that have been overgrown with trees is another place to look.

In the pic above the serious pickers will note the plastic bag. Well we stumbled onto that patch while turkey hunting.

Since then we enter the woods prepared with mess bags, and lots of them.

I'll use a stick to move leaves off to the side as I scour the ground. Once I find a mushroom I'll be on all fours looking for its friends.

As far as Morels in Hibbing, I don't know. I'd sure like to find some around my place. I even went as as far as crumbling up a few Morels and scattered them around my place.

They sure are good to eat.

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Um, with fresh trout!!! I've run across sparse patches around Ely, nothing like Southern MN and Wisco however.

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Nate

I am not a morel expert, but are the 2 you're holding up "false morels"? The pores look different and they don't look hollow. Did they have a cotten like substance in the stem?

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Nope, those are the real deal at least as far as I can tell! False morels have more of a solid stem and in my opinion, look much more like a gray morel.

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False morels are not hollow which should help you determine what is what. Take one and slice it the long way and if its hollow then you are good to go.

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I've looked a few times, but never found any. Just like shed hunting.

Where would a person go to buy some? And how much?

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You would have to go to specialty food stores and usually just in spring from what I've seen. They are not cheap, can't remember for sure but know I saw them for over $20/lb at a place in Brainerd. You can buy the dried version for about $5 per small package I believe are an once that you rehydrate with water.

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im good friends with nate, trust me..even i dont know his secret spot (yetsmirk.gif)!!!

smile.gif

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